Current Groundwater Investigations at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Rick Hay

Documents

txtagd
  • 1. Current ground waterinvestigations at Texas A&MUniversity-Corpus ChristiRichard Hay1, Dorina Murgulet2, Richard Coffin3,Valeriu Murgulet4,1Assistant Director Center for Water Supply Studies, 2Assistant Professor of Geology TAMUCC, 3Department ChairPhysical and Environmental Science TAMUCC, Research Associate Physical and Environmental Science TAMUCC.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 2. Outline• Water Resources and Climate– Precipitation– Stream flow– Groundwater• Ground water discharge to estuaries– Geophysics– Geochemistry– Hydrogeology• Ground water discharge to Nueces River– Geochemistry– Geophysics– Hydrogeology• Ground water/Surface water interaction– Thermal profilers– Geophysics• Ground water and hydrocarbons– Stable Isotopes– C-Methane– C-Carbon dioxideTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 3. ClimateTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 4. South Texas Precipitation• 200 meteorologicalstations.• Spatial interpolation(kriging) to fill inmissing data.• Daily precipitationdatasets 1890-200612001000800600400200Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014AUSTINSAN ANTONIOCORPUS CHRISTIBRYANLAREDOMCALLENVICTORIAST. HEDWIGARANSAS PASSBROWNSVILLEÜLegendMeteorological StationsUrban Area0 50 100 KmTEXASStudy Area0Rainfall (mm)
  • 5. Climate Indicators• ENSO – El Niño Southern Oscillation 2-4y• AMO – Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation 20-40 y• PDO – Pacific Decadal Oscillation ~10-20y• MEI – Multivariate ENSO index 2-4y• Represent measureable phenomena that correlatewith weather patterns (climate).Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 6. El Niño Southern Oscillation• El Niño– wetter weather in Texas• La Niña – drier but more volatile weatherTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 7. Stream Flow• Normalized Stream Flow – datacompiled from 16 unimpairedUSGS stream gages.• Transformed from a timedomain to frequency• Wavelet transform– Change in frequencyover timeStrong signals at 12,36-64, 128 monthsTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 8. Ground Water• Successful correlation of stream flow withclimate indicators suggests that groundwater resources may have a similarresponse to the climate “teleconnections”• Currently developing an index similar to thenormalized stream flow for ground water insouth Texas.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 9. Ground Water Discharge to BaysTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 10. Submarine Groundwater discharge and hypoxia• Using radonand resistivityto identifyareas of groundwater dischargethat may bedeliveringnutrients to thebay.HypoxicPlumeTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 11. Ground water flux to bayD E F• Figures 12-14: Oso Inlet time-lapse and difference conductivity inversions. (Note: Boxesrepresent source locations for SGD calculations and red dots indicate the location of Rn andconductivity monitoring, collected in sequence with the resistivity profiles)Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 12. Changes in Rn and SC• Time-lapse Radon (Rn) and conductivity data.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 13. Salinity in the Lower NuecesRiverTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 14. Ground water discharge to theNueces River• Calallen Pool – Small impoundmentfrom a salt water barrier dam whereCorpus Christi and other entities takewater from the Nueces River1980 1990 2000 2010Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014100 200 300 400Chlorides measured a 12964 (Bluntzer)Sample DateChlorides (mg/l)missingdataIncreasing chloride concentration inthe river water above the CalallenPool.
  • 15. Specific Conductance v. Depth• Specificconductancemeasurementsshow highervalues at deeperdepths• Suggests groundwater influence.Run 03 Run 040 50000 5000Specific Conductance (uS)Depth (m)0.51.01.52.02.53.0Run 01 Run 020 5000Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014Run 05 Run 06Run 070 5000Run 08 Run 09 Run 10 Run 11 Run 12 Run 130.51.01.52.02.53.0Run 140.51.01.52.02.53.0Run 150 5000Run 16 Run 170 5000Run 18 Run 190 5000Run 20 Run 21
  • 16. Calallen Pool and HazelBasemore Park• Location ofmonitoringwells• GeophysicalTransect• Salt waterbarrier damTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 17. Soil conductivity survey at HazelBasemore Park.• Red indicateshigherconductivity(saltier)• Green indicateslowerconductivity(fresher)• Monitoring wellsin agreement.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 18. Resistivity measurementsMT x-section (ohm-m)1 2 3 4 5Site.16Distance (m)• Top panel resistivity array• Bottom panel magnetotelluric sounding• Red indicates high resistivity (fresher)• Blue indicates low resistivity (saltier)Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014Depth (m)50100150Site.2150 100 150 200 250Site.22Site.20Site.19Site.18Site.17Site.15Site.13Min Coh = 0.7Mean Coh = 0.936
  • 19. Resistivity along the river channel• Fresher water in aquifer beneath river closest to thedam and furthest upstreamTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 20. Ground Water Flux• conversion of resistivity in ohm-ms (Ωm) to salinity inparts per thousand (ppt):S = 7.042 x Rp⁻¹·⁰²³³ (Manheim et al. 2004 )Vgwr = Vsal* [(Sw-Sb)/Sb]* Sb (Dimova et al., 2012)Base StationQsaline= 172.4 m3/dayQfresh= 65.7 m3/dayTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 21. Presence of Radon• Surface waternormally containslittle or no radon(short half life,dissolved gas)• Presence of radon insurface waterindicates recentground waterdischargeTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 22. Ground Water – Surface WaterTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 23. Ground water - Surface waterinteraction using thermal andgeophysical techniques• Low gradient stream on coastal plain.• Time lapse resistivity measurements• Thermal profilerTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014TemperatureLoggersWELLPROFILERWATER TABLE
  • 24. Data from Thermal ProfilersJul Sep Nov Jan Mar MayTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/201410 15 20 25 30Site SB-GW 08TimeTemperature(Celcius)Level 0 TemperatureLevel 1 TemperatureLevel 2 TemperatureLevel 3 TemperatureGroundwater3025201510Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar MayData collected over a 1 year period.
  • 25. Statistical Decomposition ofTimeseries• Random component represents periodwhere vertical advection occuredTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 26. Time Lapse Resistivity• Profile A and Bwere measured 2months apart.• C is the differencebetween the twomeasurements withthe greatest change(red area) showinglateral discharge tothe creek.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 27. Stable IsotopesTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 28. Methane Source Assessment• 35 groundwater samples were collected from activeand non-active shale play areas to better define theextent of contamination and/or differentiate betweenmethane sources (i.e. deep and shallow).• δ13CCH4 and δ13CDIC values were measured todetermine the range of signatures for shalepetroleum-sourced methane and to differentiatebetween microbial and thermogenic methanesources.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 29. Results• Both microbialand thermogenicmethane(petroleum) wereindicated in thispreliminary study.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 30. Source Water• Deuterium• Oxygen• Meteoric line• Mixing• HeatTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 31. Thank You!Questions?Contact:[email protected] (361)[email protected] (361)[email protected] (361)825-2456Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
    Please download to view
  • 31
    All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
    Description
    Text
    • 1. Current ground waterinvestigations at Texas A&MUniversity-Corpus ChristiRichard Hay1, Dorina Murgulet2, Richard Coffin3,Valeriu Murgulet4,1Assistant Director Center for Water Supply Studies, 2Assistant Professor of Geology TAMUCC, 3Department ChairPhysical and Environmental Science TAMUCC, Research Associate Physical and Environmental Science TAMUCC.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 2. Outline• Water Resources and Climate– Precipitation– Stream flow– Groundwater• Ground water discharge to estuaries– Geophysics– Geochemistry– Hydrogeology• Ground water discharge to Nueces River– Geochemistry– Geophysics– Hydrogeology• Ground water/Surface water interaction– Thermal profilers– Geophysics• Ground water and hydrocarbons– Stable Isotopes– C-Methane– C-Carbon dioxideTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 3. ClimateTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 4. South Texas Precipitation• 200 meteorologicalstations.• Spatial interpolation(kriging) to fill inmissing data.• Daily precipitationdatasets 1890-200612001000800600400200Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014AUSTINSAN ANTONIOCORPUS CHRISTIBRYANLAREDOMCALLENVICTORIAST. HEDWIGARANSAS PASSBROWNSVILLEÜLegendMeteorological StationsUrban Area0 50 100 KmTEXASStudy Area0Rainfall (mm)
  • 5. Climate Indicators• ENSO – El Niño Southern Oscillation 2-4y• AMO – Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation 20-40 y• PDO – Pacific Decadal Oscillation ~10-20y• MEI – Multivariate ENSO index 2-4y• Represent measureable phenomena that correlatewith weather patterns (climate).Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 6. El Niño Southern Oscillation• El Niño– wetter weather in Texas• La Niña – drier but more volatile weatherTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 7. Stream Flow• Normalized Stream Flow – datacompiled from 16 unimpairedUSGS stream gages.• Transformed from a timedomain to frequency• Wavelet transform– Change in frequencyover timeStrong signals at 12,36-64, 128 monthsTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 8. Ground Water• Successful correlation of stream flow withclimate indicators suggests that groundwater resources may have a similarresponse to the climate “teleconnections”• Currently developing an index similar to thenormalized stream flow for ground water insouth Texas.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 9. Ground Water Discharge to BaysTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 10. Submarine Groundwater discharge and hypoxia• Using radonand resistivityto identifyareas of groundwater dischargethat may bedeliveringnutrients to thebay.HypoxicPlumeTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 11. Ground water flux to bayD E F• Figures 12-14: Oso Inlet time-lapse and difference conductivity inversions. (Note: Boxesrepresent source locations for SGD calculations and red dots indicate the location of Rn andconductivity monitoring, collected in sequence with the resistivity profiles)Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 12. Changes in Rn and SC• Time-lapse Radon (Rn) and conductivity data.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 13. Salinity in the Lower NuecesRiverTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 14. Ground water discharge to theNueces River• Calallen Pool – Small impoundmentfrom a salt water barrier dam whereCorpus Christi and other entities takewater from the Nueces River1980 1990 2000 2010Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014100 200 300 400Chlorides measured a 12964 (Bluntzer)Sample DateChlorides (mg/l)missingdataIncreasing chloride concentration inthe river water above the CalallenPool.
  • 15. Specific Conductance v. Depth• Specificconductancemeasurementsshow highervalues at deeperdepths• Suggests groundwater influence.Run 03 Run 040 50000 5000Specific Conductance (uS)Depth (m)0.51.01.52.02.53.0Run 01 Run 020 5000Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014Run 05 Run 06Run 070 5000Run 08 Run 09 Run 10 Run 11 Run 12 Run 130.51.01.52.02.53.0Run 140.51.01.52.02.53.0Run 150 5000Run 16 Run 170 5000Run 18 Run 190 5000Run 20 Run 21
  • 16. Calallen Pool and HazelBasemore Park• Location ofmonitoringwells• GeophysicalTransect• Salt waterbarrier damTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 17. Soil conductivity survey at HazelBasemore Park.• Red indicateshigherconductivity(saltier)• Green indicateslowerconductivity(fresher)• Monitoring wellsin agreement.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 18. Resistivity measurementsMT x-section (ohm-m)1 2 3 4 5Site.16Distance (m)• Top panel resistivity array• Bottom panel magnetotelluric sounding• Red indicates high resistivity (fresher)• Blue indicates low resistivity (saltier)Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014Depth (m)50100150Site.2150 100 150 200 250Site.22Site.20Site.19Site.18Site.17Site.15Site.13Min Coh = 0.7Mean Coh = 0.936
  • 19. Resistivity along the river channel• Fresher water in aquifer beneath river closest to thedam and furthest upstreamTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 20. Ground Water Flux• conversion of resistivity in ohm-ms (Ωm) to salinity inparts per thousand (ppt):S = 7.042 x Rp⁻¹·⁰²³³ (Manheim et al. 2004 )Vgwr = Vsal* [(Sw-Sb)/Sb]* Sb (Dimova et al., 2012)Base StationQsaline= 172.4 m3/dayQfresh= 65.7 m3/dayTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 21. Presence of Radon• Surface waternormally containslittle or no radon(short half life,dissolved gas)• Presence of radon insurface waterindicates recentground waterdischargeTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 22. Ground Water – Surface WaterTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 23. Ground water - Surface waterinteraction using thermal andgeophysical techniques• Low gradient stream on coastal plain.• Time lapse resistivity measurements• Thermal profilerTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014TemperatureLoggersWELLPROFILERWATER TABLE
  • 24. Data from Thermal ProfilersJul Sep Nov Jan Mar MayTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/201410 15 20 25 30Site SB-GW 08TimeTemperature(Celcius)Level 0 TemperatureLevel 1 TemperatureLevel 2 TemperatureLevel 3 TemperatureGroundwater3025201510Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar MayData collected over a 1 year period.
  • 25. Statistical Decomposition ofTimeseries• Random component represents periodwhere vertical advection occuredTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 26. Time Lapse Resistivity• Profile A and Bwere measured 2months apart.• C is the differencebetween the twomeasurements withthe greatest change(red area) showinglateral discharge tothe creek.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 27. Stable IsotopesTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 28. Methane Source Assessment• 35 groundwater samples were collected from activeand non-active shale play areas to better define theextent of contamination and/or differentiate betweenmethane sources (i.e. deep and shallow).• δ13CCH4 and δ13CDIC values were measured todetermine the range of signatures for shalepetroleum-sourced methane and to differentiatebetween microbial and thermogenic methanesources.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 29. Results• Both microbialand thermogenicmethane(petroleum) wereindicated in thispreliminary study.Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 30. Source Water• Deuterium• Oxygen• Meteoric line• Mixing• HeatTexas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • 31. Thank You!Questions?Contact:[email protected] (361)[email protected] (361)[email protected] (361)825-2456Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts – 10/30/2014
  • Comments
    Top