• Better Newspaper Contest 2010-2011 Minnesota Newspaper Association PORTFOLIO WEEKLY WINNERS ON BACK  Press Photographer’s Portfolio All Dailies–12 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times, Jason Wachter Impressive portfolio of beautiful, well-composed photos. From sports to breaking news, Wachter is a versatile photographer who seems to always capture just the right image. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, David Samson Samson offers a nice portfolio of photos, here. I was struck by his use of and ability to capture vivid colors - most notably the flying lantern shot. Great emotion captured in some of the sports shots, as well.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 2 General Excellence Subscription Information Local – $28.00 / year Minnesota – $31.00 / year Out of State – $35.00 / year Contact Us Grain MarketsSubscribe to The Independent by the year and save $11.00 over the newsstand price. Call 218-338-2741 today! Subscription Information 75¢THE Local – $28.00 / year Minnesota – $31.00 / year Out of State – $35.00 / year www.ppindependent.net E-mail: [email protected] Ph. 218-338-2741 • FAX 218-338-2745 PO Box 42, Parkers Prairie, Minnesota Contact Us Monday, October 4, 2010 Wht. Corn Oats B rly Soy Rye Central Ag, E.B. – 3.54 1.80 1 .80 9.51 3.55 Pro-Ag, Parkers Pr. 6.16 3.71 2.20 2 .30 9.59 – (Call before delivering to Pro-Ag) Grain Markets Parkers Prairie LLC THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010 VOL. 108, NO. 35 www.ppindependent.net Combine destroyed by fire Inwards & Bercier crowned at PPHS Coronation ‘Dig Pink’ Night for cancer October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and to promote cancer awareness among women, the Parkers Prairie Panther girls volleyball is hosting a “Dig Pink” night. “Dig Pink” night will be the last regular season home game against the Underwood Rockets, Tuesday, October 19th. The volleyball team is selling “I dig pink” t-shirts to fans for $10 at all home games. Two-thirds of the profit will be donated to the Amer- ican Cancer Society and one-third will come back to the team. Fans can either purchase a shirt or dress in pink for this night. Di- ane Ross, head coach of the Un- derwood Rockets is excited about the idea. Her girls, as well as the Panthers, will be wearing the pink t-shirts during warms ups. Boots for Kids District 5M9 Lions Clubs are collecting “Boots for Kids” for the tornado victims of this past sum- mer. The drive will also be collect- ing new clothing, socks, underwear, caps and mittens for ages 2-17. ‘Boots for Kids’ will run until October 31, 2010. Items can be dropped off at Dick’s Standard, Prairie Pine Insurance, and the Parkers Prairie City Hall. The Parkers Prairie Fire Department was called out shortly before 5:00 p .m. on Wednesday, September 29th t o County Highway 40 east where a Jo hn Deere combine was fully engulfed in flames. Brian Hemquist, of rural Parkers Pra irie, had driven the combine out onto the road when he noticed smoke co ming from the rear of the combine. A s of press time, no cause for the fire had been found, and the combine was a total l oss. Responding to the scene were t he Parkers Prairie Fire Department and Otter Tail County Sheriff’s depar tment. – Photo by Jakki Wehking Parkers Prairie High School held its Homecoming Coronation Monday night by crowning King Seth Bercier, son of Dan and Melany Wilken, and Queen Ruth Inwards, daughter o f Steve and Marilyn Inwards. The two will reign over the Homecoming activities this week. Thursday night there is a home volleyball matc h against Ashby, and Friday’s football game is against New York M ills. There will be a parade at 6:15 before the football game, tailgating, performance by Just for Kix and flag football at halftime to name som e of the activities taking place. See page 10 for the group photo. – P hoto by Jakki Wehking Autumn colors abound in area Autumn showed its colors this past w eek just north of Parkers Prairie on County Highway 65, near the junction of County Highway 40. – Photo by Jakki W ehking Property Owners on Lake Irene, Lake Mary and Lake Miltona or other people who want more in- formation on how they can be in- volved in their lakes are encour- aged to attend the Douglas County Lake Association Meeting on Oc- tober 13 at 4:30 p.m. to hear Don Hickman of the Healthy Lakes and Rivers Partnership who has worked with more than 240 lake and riv- er groups since its beginning in 1999. The meeting will be held at the Douglas County Public Works Building at 526 Willow Drive in Al- exandria. Representatives from Lake Miltona, Lake Mary and Lake Irene are currently submitting their final strategic lake management plans to the Healthy Lakes and Rivers Partnership and West Central Ini- tiatives. When plans are approved and grant funds received, work can begin on the implementation phrase. The plans were developed in special focus meetings held by each lake association which mem- bers were encouraged to attend and to have input on what they as a group felt was critical for their lake. According to Bonnie Huettl of Lob- ster Lake, “working on these plans and implementing the projects can bring a sense of community and ownership to the members besides benefitting the lake itself.” Lobster Lake completed their plan in 2005 and will soon be work- ing to update that plan. Each lake association has specific priorities for action depending on the con- ditions in and around their lakes. Lake Miltona, for example, will move ahead to establish a long- term program to monitor water quality by chemical analysis of the lake water which differs from just measuring water clarity. Funds from the grant along with trained local volunteers and professional water testing will insure that the monitoring system is thorough and ongoing so as to address any poten- tial damage to the lake now and in the future. Fisheries management, land management and zoning, aquatic and shoreland vegetation, wildlife habitat and other impor- tant objectives are included in the various strategic plans being com- pleted by the three lake associa- tions. You are invited to attend on Wednesday, October 13th at 4:30. For more information, please contact: Bonnie Huettl, President of the Douglas County Lake Asso- ciation, 320-834-3287; Dick Kuehn, President of the Lake Miltona As- sociation, 320-852-7588, Jim Ras- mussen, President of the Lake Irene Association, 218-943-1698, Tim Ward, President of the Lake Mary Association, 210-866-5265; or Don Hickman of the Little Falls Initia- tive Foundation, 320-632-9255. Plans for three Douglas County Lakes nearing comple tion Join us every Monda y at 10:10 a.m. on KDOM Radio 94.3 FM & 1580 AM Tech Bytes: Now on t he RADIO! Technology Division of Citizen Pu blishing Co.ii Contact the iCitizen e xperts! 831-3455 or 1-800-6 58-2510 Rick Frederickson & A dam Olson E-mail your questions to tech [email protected] techbytes radio citizen b ox.indd 1 * Real World Adobe InDesign 11/5/2010 1:58:19 PM W E D N E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 1 , 2 0 1 0 A look back . . . H L P Wed. 29 3 .08 Thurs. 18 3 — Fri. 30 17 — Sat. 35 17 — Sun. 45 32 — Mon. 38 17 .30 Tues. 20 13 .07 Teacher of the Year 'special'izes Cartwright has been special education teacher in Windom for 19 years ■ Page 6 WAMHS instrumental music department kicks off concert schedule ■ Page 9 Sights, sounds of year's fi rst concert WHAT’S INSIDE � e end of an era After long tenure, County Attorney Storey leave on his terms ■ Page 2 ONLINE POLL Last Week’s Results Next Week: Vote at www.windomnews.com WEATHER Ready to rumble Cobras open season Saturday ■ Page 13 Top prices paid for your corn Check daily corn prices at: www.poet.com/ binghamlake 507-831-0067 888-831-0067 40212 510th Ave., Bingham Lake, MN Bingham Lake "Now that airports have added full-body scanners to security, which would you prefer? "In hindsight, do you believe the bail out of General Motors was a good idea?" Cottonwood Count y W E D N E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 1 , 2 0 1 0 VISIT US ONLINE A T WWW.WINDOMN EWS.COM 127th year 48th edition $1.25 ❏✔ ❏ ❏ ❏ I'll take some other transportation .22% Don't do either ..............9% Full-body pat-down .............5% Full-body scan ................64% Publishing Compan yreprints digital Visit www.windomnews.com an d click on the photo gallery icon . Call 507-831-3455 or 800-6 58-2510 reprints front citizen box. indd 1 * Real World Ado be InDesign 9/7/2010 10:50:04 AM DID YOU KNOW? Jackpot begins to grow � e "Shop Windom Bucks" weekly drawings are only a week old, but the Jackpot Drawing, set for Dec. 13, has already doubled in dollars. A $100 cash prize that went unclaimed in the fi rst drawing will be added to the pot as well as any future unclaimed Chamber Bucks. Last year's Jackpot Drawing was worth $700. ■ County commission ers will meet with SWC D officials Dec. 14. Cottonwood County and the Cottonwood Soil & Water Con- servation District look more like partners every day. Although an agree ment is not set in stone, the SWCD has already taken on a few of the environmental of fice duties at no additional c ost to the county. County co mmission- ers Tom White and Ron Kue- cker met with SWC D leaders last week and reach ed a broad understanding of h ow the ar- rangement would w ork. It appears SWCD w ill han- dle most of the cou nty’s con- cerns related to wat er and sep- tic systems. They a greed that SWCD could be th e public’s fi rst contact point for ditch- related matters. T hey would then be directed to specific county officials f or further information or dis cussion. Kuecker and Wh ite were upbeat about the discussion as they gave their report to commissioners las t week. “They are looking to hire 1-1/2 to 2 people, ” Kuecker said. “The equival ent of that number of employ ees is what the county would p ay for.” Details of the arra ngement will likely be ham mered out when SWCD lead ers meet with the full boar d of com- missioners on Dec . 14. White said it is not likely an agree- ment will be fi nali zed at that meeting. However, he said it is possible the mat ter will be settled on Dec. 28. “What is importan t is that we get the work done and we get some adm inistrative help,” Kuecker sai d. “That is what is needed.” The board expects to hire seasonal workers to handle the bulk of the pa rk-related matters, while th e new em- ployee would overs ee the over- all county park ope ration. One other area th at could become a key com ponent of the employee’s job is matters related to Geogra phic Infor- mation Systems. U nder this plan, the county could cut staff by one full-tim e worker. County, SWCD deal gathers momentum Making spirits LAYNA AND CODY BARFKNECHT of Windom were delig hted to be sitting in Sa nta's lap during th e Jolly Old Elf's f irst official visit to Wind om Friday night. W hile 6-month-old La yna sucked her thumb, 2-year-old Cody to ld Santa what he wa nted for Christmas. Sa nta spent an hour -and-a-half listenin g to children's Christm as wishes in front of the 12-foot tree in the Cottonwood Coun ty Courthouse rotu nda. DAVE FJELD 12/1 s antavisit 101 DANIEL STAPLES, 6 months, of Lakefield didn't mind sitting on Santa's lap once Santa offered up an enticing candy cane. 7-YEAR- OLD Caden Wiens of Windom was one of several well- prepared youth who brought Santa a Christmas wish list. DRESSED IN Christmas red, 4-year- old Gabriella Otero of Windom was another youngster who brought a Christmas wish list for Santa to read. DAVE FJELD 12/1 s antavisit 176 DAVE FJELD 12/1 s antavisit 154 DAVE FJELD 12/1 s antavisit 140 DAVE FJELD 12/1 s antavisit 187 THE TALL Christm as tree in the Courthouse rotu nda was the perfect backdrop as MaKayla Marcy, 4, dressed in Christmas green, told Santa h er Christmas desires. Big turnout for Santa's fi rst visit to Windom ■ Thirty people have applied for Windom’s econ omic development direc tor job. City offi cials were hoping for at least 20 appli cations for the Windom econo mic devel- opment job. They g ot 30. Not only that, exa ctly half of the applications came from out of state, some from as far away as Washingto n, Utah and Arizona. City Adm inistrator Steve Nasby said there were a number of “well -qualifi ed” candidates. “We had a wide r ange of individuals whose qualifi ca- tions vary,” Nasby said. “We had some who w ere recent graduates of colleg e or gradu- ate school. Over ha lf of them have more than thr ee years of experience. A hand ful had fi ve to 10 years of expe rience.” Nasby said that o f the 14 in-state candidates , seven are from southwest M innesota. “Some other can didates have experience and have moved away from th e area and are now looking to come back to the area,” Nasby said. The EDA has sche duled a special meeting for Thursday noon. At that time they will trim the list to rou ghly seven candidates. Plans are to hold in-person or teleph one inter- views next week, f ollowed by finalist interview s starting the week of Dec. 13 . Windom EDA job draws plenty of attention Winter’s fi rst big blast pounds region ■ Several area schoo ls were closed on Tuesday. Ready or not, wint er is here. Less than 48 hour s after folks were seen stringing Chr istmas lights in cri sp fall-like weather, t he reality of wint er smacked the regio n in the nose. Star t- ing Monday aftern oon and stretchin g into Tuesday, the W indom area receive d three to four inche s of snow. The heaviest snow fall came between midnight and 4 a.m . Winds measuring 25 to 30 mph ham- pered visibility a nd plugged roads , causing several ar ea schools to close , including: Windom , Red Rock Central , Southwest Star Con cept in Okabena an d Round Lake-Brew ster. Among schoo ls running two hours late were: Mt. Lak e (public and private ), Westbrook-Walnu t Grove and Comfre y. Meanwhile, it ma de snow removal a chore for city, s tate, township an d county crews. “The wind is makin g it diffi cult, that’s for sure,” said Win dom Street Superin - tendent Bruce Cal dwell from his plo w on Tuesday mornin g. “I imagine we wi ll come back in the m orning (Wednesday ) and go over everyt hing again. “We will hold off o n the airport until (Wednesday). It is just too darn wind y in the country.” Caldwell said city c rews started about 4 a.m. on Tuesday , an hour later tha n usual, because of the high winds. It takes city crews ne arly 10 hours to cle ar the entire city, from curb to curb. He reminds reside nts that city ordi- nance requires the m to clear snow an d ice from city side walks outside the ir homes within 12 h ours of a snowfall. If they do not com ply, the city will send a notice and c ould ultimately hir e the job done at the resident’s expense . W E D N E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 1 , 2 0 1 0 The streets and sid ewalks were icy, but that d idn't deter youngsters from ar ound the area to turn out Fr iday night at the Cottonwood County Courthouse in Win dom for Santa Claus' fi rst o ffi cial visit to the commu nity. After arriving at th e steps of the courthouse aboard a Windom Fire Depa rtment fi re truck, Santa gr eeted a long line of childr en, their parents and grand parents. He greeted everyon e at the top of the steps the n took his place on a chai r in front of the Christmas t ree in the courthouse rotund a. Santa visited with nearly 100 children durin g his one- and-a-half-hour vis it Friday night, handing can dy canes to each child who s at on his knee, posed for a p icture or three and share d their Christmas wish lis t. Some children bro ught a written list of Ch ristmas desires, others shy ly whis- pererd their wants and oth- ers were beaming with joy because the fi rst si gn of the holiday season had arrived.  Weeklies up to 1,500–16 entries First Place: The Parkers Prairie Independent, LLC Excellent use of photos to illustrate stories. Stories are of interest to the community served as well as the region. Good clean layout and design. Would like to see the use of both bylines and datelines. Second Place: Le Sueur News-Herald Good overall layout and design. Good overall news content. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–17 entries First Place: Farmington Independent Love the use of white space - gives the newspaper a magazine look, very clean. Well written. Strong editorial page. Dynamite sports section. A great job throughout. Second Place: Pelican Rapids Press A really nice, community feel. Clean and easy to read. Well paginated. Many of the ads seem to come to life. Terrific entry. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–33 entries First Place: Cottonwood County Citizen, Windom Crisp, clean quality throughout the Cottonwood County Citizen ensured its top honors. The staff obviously doesn’t rely on an occa- sional home run, but provides base hits on every page every week. Congratulations on an exceptional job. Second Place: Woodbury Bulletin The Woodbury Bulletin readership should be proud of the job the newspaper staff does for them with every edition. Wide variety of coverage, engaging writing, eye appealing design and well-crafted advertisements combine to create a top-quality publication. Weeklies over 5,000–23 entries First Place: Southwest Journal, Minneapolis Modern, clean layout; ambitious use of photos. Range of news, arts and food went beyond the conventional coverage. Second Place: Morrison County Record, Little Falls After reading this paper, I felt like I knew the community, its val- ues and priorities. News coverage was thorough; from an ad per- spective, I appreciated the wide range of businesses represented. Honorable Mention: Prior Lake American The redesign is commendable; very clean and easy to read. Good balance of interesting news, arts. Enjoyed the editorial page and thought providing contact info for elected officials was valuable.
  • Page 3  2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Dailies under 10,000–10 entries First Place: Mesabi Daily News, Virginia Excellent design and lots of entry points for readers. Love the daily Page 2 feature that includes a reader-submitted photo and tons of interesting information. Outstanding mix of locally-produced copy with the requisite amount of AP stories. Easy to see this is a paper that believes in the mantra of local news. Far and away the best entry in this category. Second Place: Albert Lea Tribune The Tribune stands out thanks to its uber-local coverage of both news and sports. It’s easy to see local news is important to the staff and leadership of this paper. The Tribune’s editorial page is, by far, the best in this category; every edition I read had local columns and editorials, along with letters to the editor—the lifeblood of any good editorial page. Plenty of good-looking ads. Dailies 10,000 and over–8 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times St. Cloud does a lot right. Love the multiple entry points and refers with stories. Logos are simple but effective. I appreciate that the editors localize national stories for a wire/staff byline, and that they push readers online, with things like an online poll to interact with readers. Top Stories Online was a winner for me, as are the More Online references throughout the paper. Also enjoyed the Just Back From . . . yet another way of engaging readers. And a big kudos to the staff for putting resources behind 4 Outdoor / Fitness pages in sports, and covering a gymnastics meet and leading sports with it. Also, major props for figuring out a way to keep those TV book readers happy by, well, keeping the TV book. Overall, this paper is very local, without missing the nation and world, and is very cognizant about bridging print and web. Second Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester While this paper is not the cleanest design of the bunch, for gen- eral excellence in local content, it runs laps around the others. The daily announcement on 1A of the number of local stories is your first sign of its commitment—35 local stories, 50 local stories. Incredible. As you look through the pages, you see quickly, the Post-Bulletin is clearly a voice of the community. Loved the Look Ahead and Only at PostBulletin.com features on every section front. 2A was a good mix of topics, and I especially liked the Most Clicked, On Twitter and Punchline. The Backtalk is great reader interaction. Deal of the Day promo on 1A is something more pa- pers should do. In fact, we may steal it for ours. References to the web are always a bonus, particularly slideshows and video, along with the logos. Sports was a treat, particularly its coverage of youth sports, though the themed page header on sports each day is a bit misleading, since much of the content is general sports. Overall, the Post-Bulletin seems to cover what matters to its readers, both the big stories and the niche audience ones. Excellent!
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 4 Typography & Design Weeklies up to 1,500–13 entries First Place: The Voyageur Press of McGregor Overall clean layout and design. Second Place: Ely Timberjay Good use of photos and overall clean design and layout. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–15 entries First Place: Lake County News-Chronicle, Two Harbors Overall, really nice, clean design. It’s easy to follow and easy to read. Nice use of dominant art and some kind of graphic element with every story. Well done! Weeklies 2,501-5,000–19 entries First Place: Chaska Herald Nice use of graphics and text to complement design. Overall, very easy to read. Well done. Second Place: Northfield News Nice, simple, clean design. Good use of dominant art. Good sports coverage. Weeklies over 5,000–15 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader This staff produces a very reader-friendly paper with great use of photos and color. Section fronts are well-designed with a range of headlines that fit the edition. Great use of white space to avoid the gray throughout. Maps, info boxes as story sidebars add to readability. Staff produces a quality publication. Great job. Second Place: Southwest Journal, Minneapolis This staff also produces a very reader-friendly paper, with great use of color, inviting photographs and catchy headlines. Great use of white space throughout to avoid the gray. News series pack- aged well with sidebars and photos. Well-designed section fronts. Clean, neat typography. Staff has an eye for detail and it clearly shows. NewsNews Chronicle SHERIFF’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . .2ANEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3ASCHOOLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6A SHORELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1BOBITUARIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3BBUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4B OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5BCLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6BREAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7B Just 9 holes open at golf course PAGE 3A LAKE COUNTY VOLUME 38 ● NUMBER 16 TWO SECTIONS ● 16 PAGES SERVING LAKE COUNTY SINCE 1890 ● WWW.TWOHARBORSMN.COM FRIDAY APRIL 22 2011 $1 INSIDE ● How do your local groceries stack up? years on the Superior Hiking Trail 25 Forum Newspapers A group of hikers stand on Ely’s Peak in Duluth in 2005. The Duluth section of the Superior Hiking Trail is the latest section completed in the 25 years since the trail began as an idea by outdoors enthusiasts along the North Shore. The trail is 275 miles long after starting with just eight miles. SHTA file Some of the earliest bushwhackers and builders of bridges for the trail were workers laid off by Reserve Mining in Silver Bay. The pay was in the $5-6 range but was an appreciat- ed alternative to no income in bleak economic times along the Shore. Forum Newspapers Hiking trail pioneers aren’t comfortable with naming afavorite portion of the trail but, when pressed, the TwinLakes loop out of Silver Bay often came up. Mike Creger Gayle Coyer, executive director for the Superior Hiking Trail Association, is busy this month at the Two Harbors office planning the May 6-8 annual meeting at Wolf Ridge in Finland. The event marking the 25th anniver- sary of the trail will kick off a “Seven Summits Challenge” offering prizes to those who climb the highest peaks along the 282 miles of trail from Duluth to the border with Canada. The association isn’t resting on its birthday laurels. It still needs plenty of volunteers in the coming months and years to help blaze and maintain trails and trailheads. Good idea, good timing led to beloved trailNEWS-CHRONICLESaying “it seemed like a reason-able thing to do,” Lee Schaar put pento paper in 1985 and wrote downwhat fellow foresters in the Tofte areahad known for years: There could bea nice hiking trail along the ridgelineoverlooking Lake Superior on theNorth Shore. Schaar’s “Thomas Jefferson” mo-ment eventually led to today’s Supe-rior Hiking Trail that runs from Du-luth to Canada with just a 17-milegap left to blaze. With the general idea on paper,organizers went to work in 1986.This year marks the 25-year anniver-sary of the first carvings of the trailand the formation of the associationthat keeps it a Minnesota treasure.Memories from the many volun-teers and agency leaders who helpedgather funding and momentum forthe trail – and those who went intothe wild for flagging, blazing, andbuilding bridges – hold fond mem- ories of what has been called a “syn-chronicity of events.”Today and next week, we take alook at some of the early trailblazerswho helped on the ground and inorganizing the Superior Hiking TrailAssociation, which today consists ofmore than 3,500 members, 300 ac-tive volunteers and 282 miles of care-fully maintained trail.Learn how a national disastermarked the first meeting for the as-sociation, how tough economic timeswere leavened by work on the trail,and why hikers can find what canseem like unusual twists and turnsalong the way. There were many characters whoplayed parts. We offer a small sam-pling as the Superior Hiking Trailmarks 25 years in May at the associ-ation’s annual meeting in Finland. INSIDE ● Step into trail history,4A-5A, 7A. BY MATT SUOJA [email protected] Retail food prices increasedduring the first quarter of2011 nationwide, accordingto the latest American FarmBureau Federation’s “Market-basket Survey” that includedcomparisons to average costsin state by the MinnesotaFarm Bureau. The News-Chronicle didits own local survey on foodprices at grocery stores to seehow they compare to stateand national averages. We visited SuperOne inTwo Harbors and Zup’s in Sil-ver Bay for some price com-parisons. It’s not a scientificstudy and prices can fluctuatefor a variety of reasons. Welooked for the cheapest priceswe could find for the foodsoutside of special sales.Both SuperOne and Zup’scame under the national andstate averages for vegetable oil($1.66 in Two Harbors and$2.62 in Silver Bay for a 32-ounce container). In the na-tion it cost $2.88, up 29cents, and it comes in at$2.66 in Minnesota.Boneless chicken breastswere more expensive at Zup’sand SuperOne per pound.They were $3.99 at Zup’s and$4.71 at SuperOne comparedto $3.06 in Minnesota and$3.32 in the nation (up 22cents per pound). Zup’s came in at $2.50 forfive pounds of potatoes whileit sat at $2.65 in Minnesotaand $2.64 in the nation. Su-perOne came way under thenational and state average at$1.69. Overall potatoes are up14 cents nationally. Even though bacon isdown 46 cents per pound inthe nation at $3.86, Zup’scame in at $4.67 a poundwhile it was $3.49 at SuperOne. The state average is$3.87. Overall, most prices at thelocations were similar. It wasmore expensive to buy orangejuice and whole milk in TwoHarbors and Silver Bay com-pared to the nation and statewhile it was cheaper to buybread. According to the AFBF, re-tail prices for some foods,meat in particular, will con-tinue to rise during the year asit takes time for farmers toincrease the size of their herdsto accommodate an increasein demand. “Home cooks shopping forstaples to make their favoriteshepherd’s pie or chicken potpie recipe will definitely leavethe grocery store with lighterwallets,” said John Anderson,a Farm Bureau economist.“As anticipated, the increasedconsumer demand for meatsand dairy products that be-gan in 2009 and continuedthrough 2010 remains evi-dent as we look forward to themiddle of 2011.” According to the UnitedStates Department of Agri-culture, Americans spend justunder 10 percent of dispos-able income on food, the low-est average of any country inthe world. INSIDE Apples to apples ● See how local grocery storeprices on your favorite staplescompare to state and nationalaverages as general foodprices rise. Page 1B.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 5  Editorial Page as a Whole Dailies under 10,000–8 entries First Place: Marshall Independent Clear effort taken with creative centerpieces. Nice use of breakouts, leadins and subheads to grab and direct readers’ attention. Second Place: The Bemidji Pioneer Nice use of headers to direct readers to subjects of interest. Clean, easy-to-understand organization to design. Nice focus on local without ignoring big wire stories. Dailies 10,000 and over–8 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times Clean design with useful breakouts. Good use of art throughout. Great use of a graphic for the weather centerpiece and nicely produced. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Nice typography with news features/centerpieces. Good use of lifestyle section fronts with fun designs. Weeklies up to 1,500–6 entries First Place: Ely Timberjay Strong editorials, lots of letters to the editor, and well done local columns in a visually attractive package. Second Place: Blooming Prairie Times Good local editorials, and local columns, plus a strong letters to the editor section. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–9 entries First Place: St. Peter Herald Page has a nice small-town, folksy mix of editorials, columns, and letters. The layout is not outstanding, but it is clean and easy to read. Second Place: Jackson County Pilot The Pilot’s editorial page has a lot of content! The online poll is a nice touch. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  I enjoyed and appreciated Terry Jackson’s article about the Northern Lakes Arts Association. NLAA has certainly enriched my family’s life while we have lived here. As Terry mentioned, our son, Brian, had great opportunities to work with and be taught by talented directors through NLAA programming through the years. It is worth mentioning those people… John Artisensi, Susan Germek, Donna Kari, Dave Staubitz, Denise Dreschler, Laura Moberly, Johnnie Ferderber, Marcia Homer, Sarah Skelton, and Peter Kess.. As I mentioned to Terry when we talked, I always want to pay tribute to other artists who helped Brian along the way in music and theater programs in church, school, and community. These are Joan Larson, Sheila Clouse, Jim Lah, and Mike Hillman. Brian blossomed in this community and I know others with artistic dreams will find their mentors here, too. Thanks to all! Laurie Kess Ely, Minn. This is a reminder to all Fall Lake  Township property owners. This next Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 6:30 p.m., before the start of the regular township meeting, a special public meeting is being held to discuss the tipping fees for garbage at the trans- fer station.  The intent here is to tax each property owner via their prop- erty tax statements. The price dis- cussed at this point is $58 per homeowner, $19.72 for seasonal, and commercial properties assessed on their market value. As we all know too well, once a tax is added to your property, the chance of ever having it removed is slim to none, and it will most likely go up.  Those on fixed incomes may want to take note of this, as well as those who seldom if ever use the transfer station.  In my view, the cost of tipping should be reflected in the cost of the bags, so those who use it the most, pay the most. Myself,  I have only used the t ransfer s ta t ion once   every couple years, as it took that long to build up a bag’s worth of non-recy- cled material.  The cost of that one bag would not have made any dif- ference to me.  If I need more, I`m willing to pay the price. This  issue, to me, should be more of a users fee instead of another property tax on the already  “taxed to the max”. I would recommend to Fall Lake Township property owners, that if they feel they do not want another tax to be added to  their tax state- ment, to show up.  If not, be pre- pared to be assessed now, and in the future.  Your voice counts now, not after the fact. Barry W. Tungseth Ely, Minn. You would think that retired airline pilot and now Rep. Chip Cravaack would be an advocate for air passenger service in rural Minnesota. Well, apparently not.  With Delta Airlines wanting to end service in International Falls, Hibbing and Brainerd, Congressman Cravaack has remained silent on the issue while our U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken are urging Delta to keep passenger service in these communities.  They have also added their support to keeping funding for the Essential Air Services (EAS) Program, which is keeping Delta in Hibbing, Brainerd and International Falls.  Rep. Cravaack, on the other hand, has voted in favor of legisla- tion that would end such funding.  The fact of the matter is, com- munities in the Eighth asked their congressman to stand with them, and instead he voted the Tea Party line. This is not the representation can- didate Cravaack campaigned on.    Air passenger service to these rural airports is critical.  In Hibbing alone, some 30 jobs depend on Delta.  Regular air passenger service is also an economic development tool to keeping and attracting business- es.  Folks in Grand Rapids will tell you that the loss of air passenger service to their city negatively impacted their community.  As a can- didate, Chip Cravaack said Jim Oberstar was out of touch with our area.  By not supporting air passenger service at our rural airports, we see who is really out of touch. We deserve representation that will listen to our businesses, com- munity leaders, and constituents. Rep. Cravaack is obviously not interested in these conversations.  As a candidate for Congress I truly am interested in working with commu- nities across the district to help our communities thrive – not vote the Tea Party line.  We deserve a Congressman who is – simply put – one of us, for us.  Jeff Anderson Duluth, Minn. Steve Johnson’s July 23 letter, “Spend military funds on real needs” hit the nail on the head. Hopefully it will mildly jar the gray matter of those rightward leaners who have the chutzpah to remove the blind- ers for a moment. For the malevolent manipulat- ing of lucre to keep it gushing into the claws of the already obscenely wealthy, is losing its luster. And so is the j ingois t ic “American Exceptionalism” – more deserving of the moniker “American Greed” – referring of course to corporate hegemony or corporate plundering. William Lamppa Embarrass, Minn. When given the choice between an inconvenient truth and a reassuring lie, the po l l s show mos t Americans will opt for the reassurance. But sometimes, inconven- ient truths have a way of intruding on our comfort zone. Just ask the folks in Texas and Oklahoma, a region that is experiencing what can only be described as slow-motion incineration. Three- quarters of the state of Texas and most of Oklahoma are cur- rently in exceptional drought, the most intense category of drought. Many cities in that region have expe- r ienced unbroken weeks of high temper- atures in excess of 100 degrees and the fore- cast calls for more of the same as far as the eye can see. We all know it gets hot in Texas in summer, but here are the forecast high temperatures from Intellicast for the next week in Crawford, the Texas town made famous by George W. Bush: 105, 105, 104, 105, 106, 107 and 107. To make matters worse, unusual humidity is expect- ed to accompany the heat. And this isn’t an unusual week. It’s just more of the same weather that has gripped the region for more than a month. While drought cripples one part of the country, other regions are expe- riencing unprecedented flooding. And it isn’t just in the U.S. From Australia to Pakistan, to Russia, extreme weather has become the norm across the globe. We’re told by the overwhelm- ing majority of climate scientists to expect more of the same… much more, in fact, as the concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere continue to rise at accelerating rates due to the increased burning of fossil fuels. That’s the inconvenient truth that most Americans seem unwilling to accept. Of course, they’ve had plenty of help along the way, from a well- funded and effective public relations effort funded almost entirely by the oil, gas, and coal industries—one that has tried to raise doubts about the reality of climate change in hopes of forestalling steps that could actu- ally lessen the impacts. Critics dismiss any attempt to link extreme weather events to climate change, even though climate change models have pointed to more frequent outbreaks of drought, exces- sive heat, flooding, and severe storms. That is, until the Northeast gets hit by a big snowstorm in January. That always gets the critics harrumphing. OPINION “CONGRESS SHALL MAKE NO LAW...ABRIDGING THE FREED OM OF SPEECH, OR OF THE PRESS ;” The First Amendment of the Uni ted States Constitution e-mail: [email protected] Editorial Letters from Readers How long before we wake up to climate change? Republican legislative leaders in St. Paul were willing to force a state shutdown to protect millionaires from tax increases needed to close the state’s budget gap. But GOP leaders apparently had no such reservations when it came to hiking taxes on middle and working class Minnesotans. As the Timberjay report- ed last week, the Republican budget plan, reluctantly accept- ed by Gov. Mark Dayton on July 21, phases out a key tax credit that has helped keep property taxes more affordable for many Minnesota home- owners. It’s officially known as the Homestead and Agricultural Market Value Credit, but it’s most commonly known to tax- payers as the homestead credit. For most Minnesota home- owners, particularly for the owners of more modest homes, the credit provides significant tax relief, just over $300 a year to the owner of a $75,000 home, and about $275 for the owner of a $100,000 proper- ty. For many rural and small t own homeowner s i n Minnesota, the homestead credit has provided a substan- tial buy-down of their local property tax bill, as much as 50 percent in some cases. And because the state has reim- bursed local governments for the funds they don’t receive as a result, the homestead credit has provided tax relief to most Minnesota homeowners without affecting local gov- ernment finances. But because the credit works on a sliding scale, which phases out entirely for homes valued slightly over $400,000, it’s never been as popular in outer ring, metro area suburbs, where most homes receive little, if any, of the benefit. GOP legislators from those suburbs are now firmly in control at the Capitol, and they wasted little time in dismantling the popular tax reduction— thereby raising taxes on middle and working class homeowners. It’s the most regressive kind of tax increase, one that falls most heavily on those with the most modest homes, while those with suburban “mini-man- sions” emerge unaffected. It seems the GOP will go to the mat for millionaires, but is happy to leave average Americans with a bigger tax bite. And this isn’t the only example. One of the dirty little secrets of last December’s budget deal between President Obama and Congressional Republicans is that it raised taxes on most lower and middle class workers, while sparing high income Americans. That’s because the “Making Work Pay” tax cut approved as part of the 2009 stimulus bill was allowed to expire. That boosted taxes on those making less than $90,000 a year by at least $400 annually, or about 33 bucks a month. Whi l e some o f t ha t increase was offset by the tem- porary reduction in the Social Security payroll tax, the fact is that most workers saw smaller paychecks in 2011 as a result. We d idn ’ t hea r any Republican complaints about that, of course. In the end, they got what they wanted— an extension of the Bush tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans. So when we hea r Republicans talk about their opposition to taxes, keep in mind they’re really not talking about the taxes paid by the vast majority of Americans. They don’t object to increasing taxes on the little guy. It’s the Wall Street big shots, professional athletes, and the Paris Hiltons of the world that they’re worried about. As far as they’re concerned, the rest of us can eat cake. 4 July 30, 2011 TIMBERJAY Newspapers Tax hikes for some GOP finds tax hikes for average folks acceptable, but not for the wealthy Thanks to all who have made NLAA so worthwhile Base garbage fees on usage, not property value Cravaack puts Tea Party ideology ahead of district See CLIMATE...page 5 I second defense cuts MARSHALL HELMBERGER St. Peter Herald letters policy The Herald welcomes letters to the editor. Lette rs must be 300 words or fewer, and author’s name, auth or’s signa- ture, address and telephone number must be pr ovided for verification. Please type or print clearly. Letter s thanking individuals are not appropriate for this colum n. Anony- mous letters will not be printed. E-mail letters to elee@ stpeterherald.com, mail them to 311 S. Minne sota Ave., St. Peter, MN 56082 or fax them to 931-4522. We’re in the midst of Agriculture Apprecia - tion Week, and all sorts of statistics are sent out to the public about the importance of th e industry. Those are important, a cornucopia of informa- tion. But you know what? In this neck of the woods, we just love farmers and everyone else in that sector of the economy. Stats aside, those em- ployed in the food industry are our providers. We see them in every local business from the coffee shop to the car dealer. They are the first to buy Girl Scout Cookies when given the opportunity. They are good people, the salt of th e earth, actually. Thinking back to summer, how awesome is it to pop into the local grocery store, pay a minis- cule $8 for huge pack of pork chops, and go ho me to grill with family? We also do that with beef, chicken, and heck all kinds of meat like buffalo. Producers make i t affordable for us. Sure, we need to eat to live, b ut they put the fun in it by encouraging us to live t o eat. Prices paid to our producers could be bet- ter. We must never forget from where our food comes. Thank a farmer — or the ag trailer salesman supported by the farmer — every chance you ge t. Farmers, and the folks employed throughout the concentric rings of the agriculture industry, do their best to keep us healthy and our econom y healthy. Appreciate agriculture and the people who keep it going. St. Peter Herald editorials represent the opinion of Publisher/Editor Ed Lee. St. Peter Herald Speak Your Mind How much more snow will we get, and has it be en enough already? Whitney Scholtz St. Peter Probably another six inch- es, and it’s been way more than enough. You can’t see anything (snow banks too high) until it all melts. Naomi Harris St. Peter “At least, probably, anoth- er 10. It has been enough to where I want to move. Snow makes it hard to drive.” Laura Johnson St. Peter “Nine inches. There has been too much snow. The snowdrifts are way too high.” Jessica Feeney St. Peter “I think we’re going to get another seven inches. It has definitely ben a very long winter. Too much snow. I want to go swimming at the outdoor pool.” PAGE 4A Thursday, March 17, 2011 Opinion “Congress shall make no law ... abridging the fr eedom of speech or of the press.” Editorial We just can’t get enough of basketball this month. And the Herald’s three March Madness musketeers (Pat, Kurt and Ed) joined forces with the Dirkes. Jo Ellen’s pen is mightier than any sword, and Blake’s camera has proven battle worthy on the hardwoods of St. Peter High School and Bresnan Arena at Mankato State. Kurt and I have been on the fringe most of the bas- ketball season, leaving the heavy work on the basketball beats to Pat and the Dirkes. But when playoffs started, Kurt and I jumped like pup- pies begging to help. In case you haven’t noticed, the Herald is your local March Madness leader. ESPN would blush (or maybe chuckle) at all the coverage, which comes at readers from every angle. Pat manned the boys basketball beat, while the Dirkes are commissioned to document and hail the Lady Saints’ efforts To make sure we’re playing above the rim in the playoffs, Kurt is live-blog- ging at all the games. Check him out at www.stpeterher- ald.com They give me the video camera. I’m no documentary master, like Ken Burns, but the basketball movies have been kind of fun. Ed Lee, publisher/editor, is at [email protected] They keep it going and growing for us ASK A TROOPER ~ Did You Know? by Sgt. Jacalyn Sticha Did you know that the Mi- nor Consumption While Driv- ing Law is not about impair- ment? It is about consuming alcohol under 21 and partner- ing that choice with driving. If a minor is impaired while driving they are charged with DWI just like adults. There is no Junior DWI charge. Did you know that Minor Consumption is a separate statute from Minor Con- sumption While Driving? Driving a vehicle being the difference. When charged, under either law, the law en- forcement agency has taken a preliminary breath test and most devices provide them with the blood alcohol con- tent. It is important for par- ents to find out this result be- cause it may be an indicator of dependence, regular use or problems beyond the single incident. Did you know that the MN Department of Education and the MN Department of Health reported, in the 2010 Minnesota Statewide Student Survey, that 16% of male and 8% of female 12th grade stu- dents admitted they had drove 2 or 3 times when drinking or using drugs in the preceding twelve months? Furthermore, 7% of males and 6% of fe- males in the 12th grade have driven a vehicle once after us- ing. During these 12 months, 4% of all 9th graders reported they had driven 1 to 3 times after using alcohol or drugs. Did you know, in the same survey, 37% of male and 29% of female 12th grade students rode with a friend who was driving while us- ing alcohol or drugs; 17% of males and 16% of females in 9th grade reported the same? Did you know most al- cohol related crashes occur on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays? These three days combined account for 40% of all traffic crashes, but 61% of alcohol related Crashes. The late night hours 9 PM to 3AM account for 12% of all crashes, but 50% of alcohol related crashes. [MN 2010 Crash Facts] Did you know that wait- ing until 21 years of age before introduction to alco- hol gives our youth the best chance of remaining trouble free with regards to alcohol? Every year earlier the intro- duction to alcohol takes place - the risk increases. Alcohol issues are widespread; crash- es, fatalities, family, school dropout rates, jobs, parenting, etc. Alcohol use drastically increases our youth’s chances of being involved in violence – as aggressor or victim – in- cluding assault and rape. Did you know the sur- vey finds that 13% of males and 8% of females in the 6th grade report their first alcohol use, beyond a few sips, at 10 years of age or younger? Guest Column Jacalyn Sticha Minnesota State Patrol Youth, don’t drink and drive March Madness Ed Lee General Information: Phone................................... 507-931-4520 Classifieds .........................(507) 931-4520 FAX ...................................(507) 931-4522 Managing Editor E-mail: [email protected] Address 311 South Minnesota Ave. St. Peter, MN 56082 Office Hours .................... 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Advertising: Phone.................................(507) 931-4520 Display/Classified ad deadline: 3 p.m. Monday Internet Access http://www.stpeterherald.com Subscription Rates: $40 for 48 weeks in Le Sueur & Nicollet counties; $47 elsewhere in Minnesota; $52 out of state; $1.25 per single copy. There are no established rates for foreign coun- tries. Subscriptions are not refundable. © St. Peter Herald, 2011 The St. Peter Herald retains the publica- tion rights to all contents produced or supplied by the St. Peter Herald. Use of said materials without the written consent of the St. Peter Herald is prohibited. Contents copyrighted: all rights reserved. The following people produce the St. Peter Herald: Publisher & Editor Ed Lee ...............................(507) 931-8567 [email protected] Advertising Manager Kathleen Davies ............... (507) 931-8564 [email protected] Customer Service Sherry Wilmes .................. (507) 931-8565 Sports Editor Pat Beck .......................... (507) 931-8566 [email protected] News Editor Kurt Hildebrandt ............. (507) 931-8568 [email protected] Creative Services Supervisor ..................... Alena Webster Graphic Designers ...................................... Mary Jo Blanchard and Michelle Sund Postmaster: Send address changes to: St. Peter Herald, 311 S. Minnesota, St. Peter, MN 56082. Periodicals Postage Paid at St. Peter, Minnesota 56082. The St. Peter Herald makes every effort to ensure accuracy in display and classified advertising, but will not be liable for errors beyond the cost of actual space involved. The publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time. Volume 126 Number 11 Fond farewell To the Editor: Many comforting and complementary words have been spoken about our dear friend Jerry Hawbaker. As Mayor of St. Peter, he earned the respect and friendship of all with whom he worked and came in con- tact. During the recovery of the city and its residents following the tornado, he demonstrated his strength and ability as a leader. His rich, deep voice as a bass was always a pleasure to hear, and his love of barber- shopping was unequaled. Jerry was also a great friend to many. I met Jerry in 1971 following a bar- bershop show in Pontiac, IL which featured the Sun Tones quartet. Shortly thereafter, a quartet was formed with Jerry, Loren Cremer, Ron Friese and Wes Rooker called the “Good Time Company”. Later, Jerry and Loren joined Jack Aldridge and Al Draper from Bloomington, IL in a quartet called “Good Time Music Shop”. Today I picture all of them being reunited in the heavenly chorus (barbershop division, of course). Jerry was a loving husband to Edna, devoted father to all their children, “adopted” ones too, and loved all his grandchildren. He enjoyed the church choir and members at Union Presbyterian. He loved to cook and often made up his own recipes, which we still enjoy today. Jerry loved to be with people, enjoyed a good joke and always had several to share. Lastly, Jerry had the ” patience of Job” when he took Edna and me shopping during my visits with them. Edna would always say” I don’t need a thing-my closets are full”, but Jerry would find things for her anyway. He would then sit in the food court and wait until we were ready to leave. Everyone has their memories of Jerry and they will be with us forever. My favorite song was a solo Jerry sang on a barbershop show in Pontiac which seem so fitting now – Wagon wheels, carry me home,. May he rest in peace with our Lord. A longtime friend, Judy Cremer, Pontiac, IL Old Glory could use helping hand To the Editor: On special occasions during the year, local residents and people passing through our city have been enjoying the Avenue of Flags along Minnesota Av- enue at Minnesota Square Park. This project was the brainchild of Pat Schmitz, now deceased, and with the help of the City of St. Peter, American Legion Post #37, and good friends, the Avenue of Flags has been a reality since 1997. As with everything else, inclement weather and theft have taken their toll making it necessary to replace them. An “Avenue of Flags” fund has been established and any resident, organization or business in and around St. Peter can donate to St. Peter American Legion Post #37, P.O. Box 444, St. Peter, MN 56082 or drop it off at the Legion marked “flag fund”. Many thanks go out to “Flags Crew” for their hours, namely Ed Bakke, Tom Bartlett, Daryl Dressel, Bruce Frey, Harry Frey, Lenny Hanson, Harold Hobday, Dave Kleschuldt, Rush Lind, John Malmborg, Sonny and Betty Meyer, Le- ona Miller, Denny Nygard, Jim Purcifull, Ron Pufpaff, Tom Roessler, Audrey Schmitz, Larry Skramstad, Jeff Steffensmeier, Denny Strand, Bernie and Dawn Thieman, Bud Thomas and Greg Witty. Volunteers are welcome. Contact a group member or the American Legion. Audrey Schmitz St. Peter Letters Huckle Media, LLC.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 6 Weeklies 2,501-5,000–11 entries First Place: Litchfield Independent Review Most attractive page of all the entries, with a good mix of local editorials, columns, and letters. Second Place: The McLeod County Chronicle, Glencoe Page has good editorials and a strong letters section, section nicely enhanced with graphics. Weeklies over 5,000–8 entries First Place: Red Wing Republican Eagle Good editorial leadership, especially during Sunshine Week, a nice variety of columns, and lots of letters displayed in a bright, clean layout with good graphics. Second Place: Echo Press, Alexandria Good local content and lots of letters. Dailies under 10,000–6 entires First Place: Albert Lea Tribune Local focus is obvious. Little elements help draw the reader’s eye to the page. Good variety of columns. Second Place: The Bemidji Pioneer Good editorials. Dailies 10,000 and over–6 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune Attractive layout and generous use of art captures the eye. Local editorials contain elements that draw the reader in. Interesting and varied reader comment. I’d read this editorial page every day. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Lots of local content—and good guest commentary make these pages worth reading. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Editorial Page as a Whole OPINION WednesdaySeptember 15, 2010Red Wing Republican Eagle 4A EDITORIAL Shoppers bridge gap EDITORIAL Soaring high: Bridge celebrations are big inZumbrota, home of the region’s only coveredbridge. Friday’s bridge party, how-ever, is about the modern spanover the Zumbro River: The Min-nesota Department of Transporta-tion will open the new Highway 58bridge to motorists around 11:30 a.m.The community and businesses in particulardeserve to celebrate. Construction has hurtcommerce, because the necessary detour cir-cumvented downtown. The work is done just intime for the influx of autumn leaf-peepers.Equally worthy of celebration is the fact manyresidents made an ef for t to shop in theirhometown regardless of inconvenience. Theystayed loyal because they understand that thebridge to local prosperity means supportinglocal businesses. Rough landing: The Senate District 28 cam-paign is tipping dangerously closeto turning ugly and tasteless.Stick to the issues, please, andlet the candidates speak for them-selves and, in turn, the voters choose our nextsenator based on facts, not innuendos. Soaring high: Law enforcement went all outLabor Day weekend to find an eld-erly man lost in Pierce County.Firefighters arrived within minutesto a household fire Friday night.Emergency responders securedthe train derailment site in Hager City and workpromptly began to clear the tracks.These three events illustrate just how effec-tive and important local services are in emer-gency situations. Zumbrota has reason to party Keep it clean Ready when we need them Republican Eagle editorials represent the opinionof RiverTown management and the newspaper’s Editorial Board. (USPS 145-760) Founded in 1857 Vol 125 No. 4 Published daily Wednesday and Saturdayexcept postal holidays by Rivertown Newspa-per Group, Box 15, 2760 N. Service Drive,Red Wing, MN 55066. Phone (651) 388-8235.Owing allegiance to no political par ty andserving only what we conceive to be the bestinterests of community, state and nation. Members of the editorial board include: Steve Messick, PublisherSteve Dzubay, Associate Publisher Anne Jacobson, Editor Corrections This newspaper tries conscientiously toreport news fairly and accurately. When we fallshort of this objective, we welcome complaintsfrom our readers. Please direct your complaints to our editor,Anne Jacobson at (651) 301-7870 or [email protected] Corrections will appearon the FYI page. Subscription rates Periodicals postage paid at Red Wing, MN55066 and at additional mailing offices. POST-MASTER send address changes to the Republi-can Eagle, Box 15, Red Wing, MN 55066. 2 years 1 years 6 monthsArea mail $139 $79 $45Out-of-area mail $170 $98 $65To subscribe, residents call (651) 301-7840; out-of-area residents call (800) 284-3402. Missed paper? For a missed newspaper, please call sub-scriber services between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.weekdays at 301-7840 or (800) 284-3402. Contact us Obituaries are taken through 4:30 p.m.weekdays at (715) 425-1561 or [email protected] The toll-free number is (800) 535-1660. The fax number is (651) 388-3404. The e-mail address is: [email protected] If you have a news tip, call (651)301-7870 or (651) 301-7871. Anne Jacobson, editor [email protected], (651) 301-7870 Ryan Nilsson, sports [email protected], (651) 301-7878 Becky Wagner Ruka advertising [email protected](651) 301-7805 Circulation Billing Hugh Howard, circulation [email protected],651) 301-7851 Division Managers Steve Messick, [email protected] (651) 301-7801 Steve Dzubay, associate publisher [email protected],(715) 426-1054 A division of Forum Communications Co. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor: The enemy of our con-stitutional republic formof democracy need notonly be a dramatic, hos-tile assault by a foreignelement that garners thenews headlines. It canalso be apathy and lack ofparticipation of an unin-formed citizenry. The active exercise ofthe freedoms to vote, freespeech, free press, assem-ble, and other guaranteedprivileges are essentialavenues that ensure ourform of government willsurvive. Democracy-in- action is an inclusive,vital, often “messy”process necessary for pre-serving a just, equitableand sustainable gover-nance. The 24-memberEllsworth CommunitySchool District’s StrategicPlanning Committee (ofwhich 12 are schoolstaffers) was selected bythe superintendent. In the results of thecommittee’s goal state-ments, it is noted that notone mention or referenceis made to the teaching ofour constitutional repub-lic form of democratic government. Lives have been sacri-ficed and are now dailybeing sacrificed by ourmen and women in uni-form to preserve this cor-nerstone in the founda-tion of our country. To ensure our demo-cratic “experiment” wouldendure, our forefathersset up a system of publiceducation to provide thepeople with the knowl-edge to responsibly gov-ern themselves. How could the premiertheme of our democracynot be included in theresults of a focus group specifically conceived andconvened to chart thefuture of the public edu-cation of our youth? That is the questionthat respectfully begs ananswer and deserves adirect definitive publicresponse. Wayne Anderson Hager City Denny Dodge Nick Even Bernard and Selba Schoeder Bay City Mike Farrell Ed Holdorf Ellsworth Education needs a civics lesson To the Editor: For the over a decade, Ihave had the privilege ofknowing the Marty Kellyfamily. Marty’s parents, Mikeand Nancy. have instilledin all of their 10 childrena dedication to God, fami-ly and community. As a result, brotherTim served tirelessly onthe Red Wing School Board and now repre-sents the Goodhue Coun-ty area as state represen-tative for District 28A. Marty has kept RedWing safe for over 21years as a police officer.Brother Jim has served12 years as correctionssergeant at the countyLaw Enforcement Centerand brother Pat is a 12-year veteran deputy ofthe Goodhue County sheriff department. Marty’s sisters are noless dedicated. Laurie is programdirector for LutheranSocial Services. Chris isvice president of opera-tions for the BenedictineHealth System. Kathy works withhome and community-based support services forthe Minnesota Depart-ment of Human Services, sister Nancy is wellnesscoordinator for thePrairie Island TribalCommunity while momNancy is a hospice volun-teer. This is the kind ofbackground and supportsystem I want behind theman I vote for sheriff andthat man is Marty Kelly. Vance J. Cushing Red Wing Kelly has background we need To the Editor: We have many moreadults and young adultsriding bicycles in RedWing. I am observingreckless bike riding —going through stop signsat intersections and trails, riding in the mid-dle of the road lane notoff to the right. Those riding on thesidewalks should alsostop at intersections withstop signs. These riders should beissued a ticket and fined equivalent to a car goingthrough a stop sign.Those riding bicyclesneed to observe stop signsand road courtesy as dothose driving cars. This is a safety issue,for bikers, pedestriansand car drivers. I ask our City Counciland patrol officers to bemore aware of the con-duct of bicycle riders. Sal Baringer Red Wing Enforce bike safety regulations Your take Last week’s online poll asked:Did the egg recall change yourfood consumption habits? Here’s your take. 17.3 percent say no, but the recall made me think twice. 7.7 percent say yes Total votes: 55 75 percent say no Participate online at www.republican-eagle.com As our society ages and theage wave descends upon us all,an alarming phenomena iscreeping in on the delivery ofpublic medical aid to senior cit-izens. It is with greater andgreater frequency that duringthe course of eligibility deter-mination, we encounter “fiscalagents”, “financial planners”,and “estate attorneys.” These individuals are repre-senting and/or assisting seniorcitizens in the public medicalassistance health care applica-tion process. One will even notice thatthere are pre-retirement plan-ning workshops being set up inthe community wherein finan-cial planning experts are giv-ing advice in how to shelter and divest oneself of assets inorder to qualify for public med-ical assistance health care.Even though there aredefined income and asset limi-tations for eligibility, seniorsand consultants are findingclever and different ways toshelter large amounts of assetsin order that seniors be able to qualify for public medicalhealth assistance. If you are elderly and inneed of long-term care in anursing home, there are legiti-mate, right and proper waysfor you to still be on publicassistance while spendingdown your assets. Divesting oneself of fiscalresources readily available forone’s own self-support, in orderto qualify for public aid, isfraudulent and we do pursueit. The matter is becoming socomplicated and problematicthat the counties in southeast-ern Minnesota are working ona plan to establish a regionalteam of expert staff, from with-in our existing ranks, who will focus solely on estate recover-ies. In a Department of HumanServices Policy Bulletin datedAug. 5 (No. 9-21-11C), specificinformation and instructionswere provided to counties inhow to establish and secureestate claims recovery inestates where there was a sur-viving spouse who was not onpublic aid. EXAMPLE: During their marriage, Tomand Julie purchased a hometogether as joint tenants. Later,while receiving MA, Tom trans-ferred his joint tenancy inter-est in his home to his wife,Julie. Following the transfer,Tom passed away on July 23,2009, after receiving $108,000 in nursing home care withMedical Assistance benefits.Julie passed away in Decemberof 2009, never having receivedMedical Assistance. Julie’sheirs probated the homesteadproperty, which was valued at$210,000. ACTION: The Welfare Departmentshould file a claim against theestate of the now deceased,non-recipient surviving spouse,Julie, for the full value of theproperty or the amount of theclaim, whichever is less.In 2006, our estate recoverycollections were $383,202.72; in2007, our collections were$171,636.64; in 2008, they were$136,425.11; and in 2009, theywere $409,131.45. Divesting to qualify for public aid is wrong Greg Schoener Goodhue County Social Services Director Hometown Forum TribuneAlbert Lea AlbertLeaTribune.com Congress shall make no la w respecting an establishme nt of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petitio n the Government for a redress of grievances . — First Amendment to th e U.S. Constitution Tribune Editorial Board Scott Schmeltzer Tim Engstrom Adam Harringa Sarah Stultz Our COmments their COmments Peek at the Past Vote for Sparks Tuesday Kathy Green, who seeks office in the Senate District 27 race, should stay active in southern Minnesota politic s. She is a smart leader and v iable candidate. However, so is Dan Sparks , who deserves your vote Tuesday. Sparks has done a solid job of making connections wit h the business community of this district. He works hand in hand with Riverland Community Col- lege and works hard for pro - grams here in District 27. H e fights for JOBZ, and we tru st he will fight for its next incept ion. He serves on key Senate co m- mittees for businesses: ♦ Commerce and Consumer Protection ♦ Finance, Economic Devel- opment and Housing ♦ Business, Industry and Jobs ♦ Capital Investment ♦ Energy, Utilities, Technol- ogy and Communications Frankly, that’s someone wh o cares about jobs. In the com ing four years — four difficult y ears — we will need a state sen a- tor who is not a freshman, one who has clout in St. Paul an d can help the region get thro ugh the recession. With education, Green, a member of the Austin scho ol board, presents many ideas we agree with — such as gettin g away from state-mandated stan- dards testing and back to m ore local control. However, Sparks favors ma ny of the same things as Green and cares about securing a stable source of funding fo r schools and things like all- day kindergarten. He even favo rs getting the politics out of th e Minnesota Department of Education by taking the co m- missioner out of the cabine t, among other ideas. Roads are important to sou th- ern Minnesota’s businesses and farmers. Sparks favored the gas tax increase, which has res ulted in improved highways in th e region. He wants to get rid of the deceptive executive-bra nch tricks — deferments, unallo t- ments — that have been us ed to balance budgets. Though we disagree with the idea of a Racino to bol ster state coffers, we do apprec iate Sparks’ ability to look at ne w streams of funding. Sparks was key in helping Albert Lea clean up Edgew ater Park, and he will be impor tant in the upcoming fight over lo- cal government aid. There are other reasons, bu t the best one is that he has done a good job. We endorse Sp arks for state senator. Member of Minnesota Newspaper Ass ociation & Associated Pres s Subscription rates City carrier 1 year $129 8 months $86 4 months $43 Motor carrier 1 year $159 8 months $106 4 months $53 Out-of-area mail 1 year $198 8 months $132 4 months $66 The Albert Lea Tribune is published daily, except Saturdays. Periodicals paid at Albert Lea, MN 56007. Office hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday. Delivery times: Carriers are scheduled to deliver prior to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. on Sund ay. If you do not receive your T ribune on time call 379-34 23. Circulation lines are open until 6 p.m. Monday throu gh Friday and from 7:30 to 10 a.m. Sunday. General Information 808 W. Front St., Albert Lea, MN 56007-006 0 Phone: (507) 373-1411 Fax: (507) 373-0333 [email protected] ISSN 1051-7421 News [email protected] m [email protected] m [email protected] m Danielle Boss ♦ 379-3436 Andrew Dyrdal ♦ 379-3437 Michelle Haacke ♦ 379-3434 Kelli Lageson ♦ 379-3439 Sarah Stultz ♦ 379-3435 Ed Shannon ♦ 379-3438 Circulation [email protected] m Melissa Goodwin ♦ 379-3422 Retail Advertising [email protected] m Catherine Buboltz ♦ 379-3428 Renee Citsay ♦ 379-3430 Clay Culbertson ♦ 379-9851 Angie Hoffman ♦ 379-3429 Classified Advertising [email protected] m Michelle DaVeiga ♦ 379-9850 Joan Miller ♦ 379-3425 Creative & Graphic Design Kathy Johnson ♦ 379-9859 Children should not be in smear ads It was indeed disturb- ing to me, and many othe r voters I have talked to, to see innocent children use d in political ads to project a bad image of Tim Walz, a respected and outstandin g congressman. Lorraine Scot Albert Lea Walz tinkered with Medicare Advantage Thanks to Rep. Tim Walz, we have been notified tha t our Medicare Advantage insurance is no longer ava il- able. This is after he note d in the town hall meetings that everyone could keep their policies if they liked them. Obviously, he did n ot know what was in the bill . Five hundred billion dolla rs from Medicare is being cu t over the next 10 years so the seniors are going to pay a lot more so 30 million withou t insurance will be covered . We are going to vote for R an- dy Demmer, and if you ar e a senior we would encourag e you to also vote for someo ne who will not put the healt h care problem on the backs of seniors. Russ Tordoff Glenville Thanks for finding purse at Nelson’s I wish to thank the won- derful lady who found my purse in the shopping car t at Nelson’s Market this p ast week and took it into the service counter. Nelson’s g ot in touch with me, and I w ent back and got it right away . Thank you again for the g ood deed. Vivian Miller Albert Lea Republicans caused the $6 billion deficit I saw a headline in the le t- ter to the editor section th e other day that read “Repu b- licans will solve problems .” I had to stop and think abo ut this for a minute. So let’s see here. When ou r governor, Tim Pawlenty, t ook office, we were looking at a $1 billion deficit. Why wa sn’t this problem fixed before the 2002 election? It was beca use of Pawlenty’s unwillingne ss to work with then-Gov. Je sse Ventura. Mr. Pawtenty ha d chosen to use the deficit a s a campaign tool in the 20 02 election. Then the Interstate 35W bridge collapsed, and it showed to the entire nati on just how badly our roads and bridges were in dire need of repair. Gov. Pawle n- ty vetoed a gas tax increa se to fix them. Yet when sev en Republicans joined the Democrats in voting to ov er- ride the governor’s veto a nd pass a gas tax increase (t he first increase in 20 years ), what did our Republican Gov. Tim Pawlenty do? H e and Republican Minority Leader Marty Seifert did everything possible to ge t the seven Republicans vo ted out of office. In the eight years with our Republican governor, the state’s deficit has gro wn from $1 billion to $6 billi on. Why? Due to Gov. Pawlen ty and his party’s unwilling - ness to compromise, we a re in the financial problems that we are in today. It su re looks like the Republican s have created more proble ms than they have solved. It is time for a change, and th e Republicans are not the answer. Arthur A. Anderson chairman Freeborn County DFL P arty Albert Lea YOur COmments Here are highlights in his tory for Oct. 27, gleaned from the files of the Albert Lea Tribune: 1991 — A Tribune article featured Richard and Anita Borlan d of rural Clarks Grove who were op erating Cafe Borland in Clarks G rove. 1981 — The Albert Lea C ity Council approved $2 milli on in in- dustrial revenue bonds fo r a 31,000 square foot warehouse ad dition on the north side of the Strea ter firm. 1941 — The Hayward Cre amery Association celebrated its 50th anniversary. Send Your Comments ♦ Send letters via mail to Letters to the Editor, Albert Lea Tribune, P.O. Box 60, Alb ert Lea, MN 56007, or via e-mail to [email protected] atribune.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Le tters cannot exceed 500 words. They must have one au thor. Petitions are not printed. Letters must include a ddress and telephone number for verification purpo ses — only your name and city of residence will be p rinted. Each author may write one letter per calen dar week. Letters are published as soon as space allo ws. To request a guest column, contact Managing Ed itor Tim Engstrom at 379-3433. Feel free to call if yo u don’t see your letter. Being a homemade superhe ro for Halloween Halloween is like taking candy from strangers. I was setting on ready. I had the “want to.” I wanted to be a superhero. I read the comics at the barbershop. That kept me plugged into the world of superhe- roes. I thought I could be a superhero. I’d already changed the course of history. That’s h ow I flunked the history test. A superhero would de- mand that folks fill my pi l- lowcase with goodies bett er than candy corn — the la st new candy corn was made in 1923. Some people gave fun-size candy bars. They were miniscule. Fun-size should be the size of a Bu ick. The gym teacher made tr ick- or-treaters do ten pushup s before he gave out candy. The year before, I had dressed like a monster an d carried a kite. I’d gone tri ck- or-treating as Benjamin Frankenstein. I was a shi ver looking for a spine to run up. It was a childish attem pt at sarcasm. How many other kids went as Benjam in Frankenstein? The numb er was at or below zero. My neighbor Crandall carried a TV remote and went as h is father. Every Halloween, I heard the same thing. “What are you sup- posed to be?” It didn’t matter. Each Hallow- een, I got candy. My mother got sympathy cards. I had given up trying to be scary at Halloween. It was impossible to find anything scarier than election ads. I want- ed to be a superhero. My mother suggested that I b e a ghost instead. A couple of slits for my eyes cut in an old sheet and I’d be set. I didn ’t want to be a ghost. I’d bee n a ghost before and had lost my haunting license. I gave m y mother the oath. “If you get me a superher o costume, Mom, I promise I’ll never ask for anything ev er again. I’ll do whatever you tell me to do and I’ll alwa ys be ready early for Sunday School. I promise to apply myself in school, keep my room clean, and to eat eve ry- thing on my plate because of all the starving children i n China.” I went on and on. It was a bad pitch with an elabora te windup. Like a cloying po liti- cian, I tended to overprom ise and underdeliver. I was steadfast in my desire to be a superhero. Mother said she’d see wha t she could do. I smiled like an Academy Award winne r. I had to sit on my hands t o keep from clapping. My mother decided to put dressing on the turkey an d found a T-shirt featuring an image of a discount super - hero. The dime store pur- chase was as big as a tent . She liked things that I co uld grow into. To go with the T-shirt that wasn’t super duper, I spor ted a long underwear bottom. Over it, I donned boxer sh orts that my mother had dyed red and sewn the fly shut. I decided to wear the shorts backwards with the fly in the back. It was a nice touch. I stood in front of a full- length mirror. An act that regularly broke my heart as I watched me growing up so fast. What was presented this time would have been a challenge for even the mo st fulsome of flatterers. I sun k down like a sow in a swam p. The mirror had turned on me and had become like a vending machine that too k my money but didn’t give me what I wanted. The trick- or- treater I saw was despair - inducing. The T-shirt was so large that I couldn’t see a ll of the superhero who had been marked down to a go od enough-hero. The long un - derwear looked dorky. Lon g underwear has two jobs — to keep a person warm and t o look dorky. I’d eaten some beets and had spilled bee t juice on my long johns. Tr ick- or-treating would be on a night that wasn’t fit for m an nor beets. I wore battered blue sneakers. The red bo xer shorts with the fly stitche d shut in the back clearly demonstrated that I was a clotheshorse in the makin g. It wasn’t my finest mo- ment. I was a crappy vers ion of what I wanted to be. A fellow who believes in rei n- carnation told me that wh en a person dies, he comes ba ck as a lesser being. I looked as if I were on my last trip. I was living the dream. I looked at my reflection i n that mirror. I was suppose d to be a superhero but I di dn’t feel all-powerful. I had no superpowers other than t he ability to blush brighter t han the setting sun. I’ll bet that’s why so many superheroes wear masks. I was the only superhero at my school who wore a catcher’s mask. That was no fun while it lasted. Hartland resident Al Batt’s columns appear eve ry Wednesday and Sunday. The time is now for sensible state government There comes a time in everyone’s life when they have to make a choice about whether they want to help chart the course we will follow or let others set it for them. I came to that cross- roads five months ago and decided, with the help of my family and friends, that “the time is now” for me to step forward and help make a difference for the residents of District 27A. I have been humbled by the support and encourag e- ment you have shown wh en I knocked on your door. I ha ve enjoyed listening to your stories and will keep them with me as I work for you and represent you. I have heard from many of you that we need more opportunities for employ- ment and good-paying job s. I hear the anxiety in your voices when you say that you are living paycheck to paycheck. I will work hard to make the important decisions in St. Paul that will help remove barri- ers to job creation and craft solutions that will help grow the economy and put Minnesotans back to work. We must reform regulations and ad opt policies that will make us competitive with the state s that surround us. I also agree with many of you who have said that that our state governmen t is trying to do too many thin gs for too many people. Spen d- ing is out-of-control, and w e need to fix the problem so on. Government costs too mu ch, and we must reform the w ay government operates. Just as you and I need to live within our budget an d learn to prioritize those items that are the most important to our families, state government must do the same. With a busi- ness degree in finance an d accounting from Mankato State, a master’s in busi- ness administration from St. Thomas University an d the experience as a financ ial advisor for the past 27 ye ars, I have the experience nee ded to tackle a nearly $6 billio n budget deficit in St. Paul. I support reforms in educ a- tion that include eliminat ing unfunded mandates for ou r schools. I believe our educ a- tion system should focus o n student achievement. I be - lieve our teachers should be encouraged to use innova tive and creative ways to help our children succeed and not spend their time teach - ing to a test. I believe as d o many others that our sch ools will succeed best with loc al control and less interfer- ence and mandates from the Washington and St. Paul. I was born and raised in southern Minnesota and understand southern Min - nesota values of faith, har d work, family and commun ity. The status quo is unac- ceptable. The time is now for new leadership. The time is now for sensible governm ent. The time is now to send a strong voice from souther n Minnesota to St. Paul. I refuse to place our prob- lems on the shoulders of o ur children and grandchildre n. Working together we can solve the issues facing us. Please give me, Rich Mur - ray, your support and vote on Nov. 2. Rich Murray, R-Albert Le a, is the challenger in the ra ce for House District 27A. Page 4 ♦ Albert Lea Tribune ♦ W ednesday, October 27, 201 0 Painting Image above Tribune logo by Tim Engstrom: A woman watches her bowling ball roll at Holiday Lanes immediately after releasing it. To start a subscription, call (507) 379-3422 Al Batt Tales from Exit 22 Rich Murray Guest Column Letters deadline The deadline for sub- mitting letters political in nature is 5 p.m. Thursday. Send letters via mail to Letters to the Editor, Albert Lea Tribune, 808 W. Front St., Albert Lea, MN 56007, or via e-mail to news@ albertleatribune.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Opinion DuluthNewsTribune | Thursday, January 13, 2011 �About this page: Views in Our View are those of the editorialboard listed at right. Columns, cartoons and letters represent theviews of the authors. Publisher: Ken Browall Editorial Page Editor: Chuck FrederickEmployee representative: JoLissa Kowalik Letters to the editor are a criticalpart of the community dialogue, andthe News Tribune attempts to pub-lish all letters of opinion meeting ourrequirements. Letters are limited to 300 words,must be the original work of the au-thor and must be exclusive to theNews Tribune. Letters are edited forstyle, space, accuracy and civility. Letter writers are limited to onepublished submission every 30 days.With rare exceptions, the NewsTribune does not publish poetry; let-ters that are anonymous, libelous orattack other writers; consumer-com-plaint letters; thank-you letters; or letters generated by political orspecial-interest campaigns. We will consider exclusive LocalView columns of 600 words or fewer.Authors should possess unique in-sights, and their commentariesshould demonstrate greater knowl-edge of their subject than letters. E-mail submissions to: [email protected] Mail to: Readers’ Views, DuluthNews Tribune, 424 W. First St.,Duluth, MN 55802. Fax to: (218) 720-4120. Include a full name, address anddaytime phone number. Only namesand hometowns will be published. Readers’ Views and Local Views Doonesbury OURVIEW “U se it or lose it”long has beenthe mantra forair service at Du-luth International Airport.As cliché as the words maybe, Duluth-area travelersencouragingly have been taking them to heart. Airport officials an- nounced this week that 306,330 passengers flew inand out of Duluth last year,an increase of 19 percent over 2009, and that another 5,066 passengers flew on charter airlines, an increaseof nearly 16 percent over theprevious 12 months. The year ranked as the third-busiest in the airport’s his-tory behind 2007 and 2004. The “strong passengernumbers,” as Airport Au-thority Executive DirectorBrian Ryks characterizedthe data, bodes well for thecontinued availability ofUnited Express’ service toChicago and Allegiant Air’s flights to Orlando, both ofwhich were introduced justa little more than a year ago. Allegiant also offers apair of weekly, nonstop flights to Las Vegas. And Delta has five daily, non-stop flights to Minneapolis-St. Paul as well as two daily, nonstop flights to De-troit. All of which can con- tinue because of the de- mand. Without passengers,the flights, and with them travel flexibility, would surely be eliminated by thebottom line-minding air-lines. “2010 has also proven that having competition inthe market between two major carriers, Delta andUnited, ensures lower air-fares for business and leisure travelers as averageairfares have dropped over$100 per roundtrip,” Rykssaid in a statement. “We arevery encouraged the region is committed to supportingthe new service we have atthe airport. “We had a very good year, even with a tough economy,” Ryks said in anote to the Opinion page,“(We) need to keep the mo-mentum going.” If we don’t, the momen-tum— and the flights thatconnect the Northland to the rest of the world — could be lost. Here’s to aneven busier 2011. Duluth-area travelers using before losing LOCALVIEW Taking stabs at the media-portrayed version of the TeaParty is almost too easy. Theparty’s sudden popularity andmixed contents puts it in thecrosshairs of eager sensationalistsready to draw quick and “unbi-ased” diagnoses to propagate tothe masses. However, unlike in other op-pressive countries, Americansenjoy the privilege of being able todraw their own conclusions. Andwhile the central theme of the TeaParty should ring true for allAmericans—whether from theleft, the right or somewhere in be-tween— radiating themes is nei-ther the scope nor the goal ofmainstreammedia. (And when asupposed headliner of the TeaParty debuts in her own realitytelevision show, the moment solid-ifies the average American’s dis-dain for the political movement —and rightfully so.) Honest or intel-lectual discourse about thisemerging third party is almost al-ways thrown to the wind.But sift through the malcon-tents of the Tea Party and a biggerpicture emerges: Oversized gov-ernment does very few thingsright; downsize it and give it backto the people. Period. Forget the big- ots, themilitias and the far-rightzealots, or youmiss the point.ShouldAmerica be upset its gov-ernment uses tax dollars to bail outcorporations, banks andmassiveinsurance companies, all of whichfell on hard times due to their ownabsurd incompetence?Absolutely.ShouldAmericans be upset theirmoney and credit systemare so sys-tematically corrupted they cannotbe fixed byBenBernanke or any-one else?Absolutely. Was the value of your house oryour pension sliced in half over thepast few years? ThatwasWallStreet, which, under our two-partysystem, leads right up the street toCapitol Hill. As a result of big government,the top 1 percent gets richer andeveryone else sinks closer topoverty. Getting angry yet? These are the things the TeaParty is concerned about. Anything said about cutting foodstamps or education in the name ofbalancing the budget is certainlyasinine. In fact, I know some localTea Party advocateswho staunchlysupport slashing the defensebudget. Democrats aren’t going todo it and neither are Republicans.There are two things the TeaParty has that neither theDFLnorGOPdo: anger and a real thirst forchange. Even inDuluthwe see the ill ef-fects of government red tape. Theowner of the historic Kozy buildingsaid he is going through the ins andouts of government interference toreopen his building, or at least a part of it, after it was gutted by fire.Ask small-business owners abouthowhard it is to stay in business inDuluth’s less-than-stellar businessenvironment. They’ll tell you allabout big government. If one citesMedicare and SocialSecurity as beneficial governmentaccomplishments then onemustalso admit our government grosslymismanaged these benefits, as theyare now trillions of dollars in thered. I’m looking at an article right nowheadlined, “The coming crisisfor BabyBoomers as they turn 65 in2011.”Without even reading the ar-ticle, we can draw conclusionswhatit’s about. The philosopher Aristotle, some2,500 years ago, had something tosay about democracy, somethingthatmay surprise those who advo-cate for a two-party system. Hesaid, “Republics decline intodemocracies and democracies de-generate into despotisms.” TheTeaParty only urges a re-turn ofAmerica to the republic itoncewas. Democracy aside, after allthe bailouts and governmenttakeovers of corporations,wehave anewpolitical ideologyhere inAmer-ica, and it is defined by itsmergingof federal and corporate powers. MARK JENESON of Duluth is an amateurpolitical analyst pursuing a degreein journalism. Mark Jeneson TeaPartywants the returnofUSto the republic it oncewas John Darkow / Cagle Cartoons READERS’VIEWS Medicare, Social Security all are forms of socializedmedicine The front page of the Jan. 6 NewsTribune included a photo of amanprotesting Gov.MarkDayton by holdinga sign reading, “NOSocializedMedi-cine.” The article about the incidentpointed out that themanwas 86. I wouldassume he is on Social Security andMedicare. If so, he shouldwake up: Healready is on socializedmedicine; it’scalledMedicare. And I suspect he also ison a government-guaranteed annualwage; it’s called Social Security. Bothprogramswere vehemently opposed bythe Republican Party at the time andbarely passed. I would like to ask theman, “Haveyou had any trouble gettingmedicalcare? Does the government check comeeverymonth? How’s it working foryou?” Bymy calculations hewould havebeen on both programs for at least 21years; not a bad return for a 1.45 percentcontribution fromhiswagesmatched bya 1.45 percent contribution by his em-ployer. I wish I could getmedical insur- ance for that price. Maybewe should all justman up andincrease our contributions by .55 per-cent andmake it an even 2 percent. Ithink this should be a partial solution tothe problem inMedicare, and then in-crease themaximumwhen Social Secu-rity taxes stop being taken out from$125,000 a year to $200,000 a year.Tome, it’s a disgrace to live in a coun-trywherewe spend $7,000million peryear on defense (that’s $700 billion ayear) and refuse to providemedical careto some of our citizens. BRYCE MAKELA DULUTH Some apparently want benefits for themselves but not others My husband, a veteran, and I had agood chuckle when we read the protestsign being held in a photo on the frontpage of the Jan. 6 News Tribune. Itread, “NO Socialized Medicine.” Theman holding it was quoted in the ac-companying story saying he “comesfrom a family with a long history ofmilitary service, but federal healthcare rubs him the wrong way” (“Open mic at the Capitol; Dayton opens floorto critics of health-care overhaul”).We wonder whether the man everreceived Medicare benefits? That’s so-cialized medicine. Has he or anyone in his family everreceived health care at a Veterans Ad-ministration clinic? That’s socializedmedicine. Seems like the man, like many oth-ers, wants the benefits of “socializedmedicine” but don’t want others toparticipate in the system.We wish we could thank him forproviding us chuckles. PAT AND GARY LARSON ELY In this photo published Jan. 6 in the News Tribune, astate trooper assigned to protect Gov. Mark Daytonorders Fremont Gruss to remove a sign protesting thegovernor’s plan to sign up for an expanded federalmedical program. Don Davis / State Capitol Bureau “I would like to ask the man, ‘Have you had anytrouble getting medicalcare? Does the govern-ment check come everymonth? How’s it workingfor you?’ ” Bryce Makela, Duluth
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 7  Weeklies up to 1,500–9 entries First Place: Blaine-Spring Lake Park Life Initial notes upon review were this: No contest. Winner. Amount of content set this paper apart, but the quality and consistency of the reporting was more so remarkable. Easily mistakable for a big- market paper. Impressive work. Second Place: Ely Timberjay Reporting was thorough and took a responsible tone, and there was a good variety of topics. Very well-rounded paper. Honorable Mention: The Osakis Review Responsible reporting style, good variety of topics, including features and health. Thorough reflection of a community for a small paper - an accomplishment. Amy Chaffins’ work in particular warrants recognition. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–18 entries First Place: Farmington Independent This category came down to a very close race between five entries. This paper covers all the bases, from features to hard news to seniors to sports, and does so consistently and in a way that is enjoyable to read. Great community coverage. Second Place: Jordan Independent Quality writing and responsible reporting made this entry stand out from the pack. Almost a first-place finisher, but overall content was the deciding factor. Good story topics; great effort overall. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–29 entries First Place: Northfield News Excellent volume, breadth and depth of news coverage, with thoughtfully written articles. A clear step above the competition in effectively telling stories. Second Place: South Washington County Bulletin, Cottage Grove Fine articles on a range of news stories and news features. General Reporting CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  by Sue Austreng Staff Writer With determined eyes fixed on a rocky financial horizon, Anoka-Hennepin School Board members unanimously approved $3.2 million in budget cuts for the 2011-2012 school year. That action, during the board’s reg- ular Jan. 24 meeting, was taken when board members adopted the $408.5 million budget for fiscal year 2012 – a budget drafted on the assumption that District 11 would receive no more and no less in state educational funding than it received last year. Superintendent Dennis Carlson, expressing disappointment in Minnesota’s failure to adequately fund education, said, “The state Legislature needs to get a job done and fund education. “This board has been fis-cally responsible. I would argue that the state needs to be fiscally responsible, too.” Anoka-Hennepin’s budget cuts will not affect teachers or pro-grams, but will affect outside-the-classroom services and activities: • Business services will be cut $75,000 – $45,000 of that result-ing from the district’s decision to implement paperless payroll. The other $30,000 comes from supply reductions and outsourcing. YOUR WEEKLY COMMUNITY NEWS SOURCE FOR 48 YEARS A SECTION Phone: 763.421.4444 Fax: 763.421.4315www.blaine-slplife.com CIRCULATION C O U N C I L VERIFICATION FRIDAY JAN. 28, 2011 Vol. 48/No. 40 3 sections/32 pages $1.00 © 2011 ECM Publishers, Inc. Quote for Life Smartphone Friendly Q R A pp R eq ui re d Scan Me! Tracked 2D barcode provides a link directly to our website ���������� �� ��� ������ ������ ����� ��� �� ����������� ���� �� ��� ���������� ��������������� ���� �������� ������� ������ � ��� ���� � ������� � ����������� � ��������� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � ��� � ��� � ���� by Elyse Kaner Staff Writer Two teachers from Spring Lake Park High School are in the running for 2011 Minnesota Teacher of the Year. The SLP teachers who have accepted the nomi-nation and completed the application process are Brook Magid Hart, guid-ance counselor for the class of 2014 (now ninth-grad-ers), and ninth grade math teacher Lori Thompson. They will vie for the top spot among 106 other teach-ers from throughout the state. The Teacher of the Year Program, orga-nized and underwritten by Education Minnesota, celebrates the tradition of excellence in education. Magid Hart is in her 11th year as a counselor at the high school. In her 16th year in educa-tion, she worked for one year in the Minneapolis Public School system and in the Ashland (Wisconsin) School District from 1995-1999. Last year at her urging, nearly 95 percent of the SLPHS graduating class, a record number, applied for college, an institute of high-er learning or the military. Thompson was named 2010 SLP District 16 Teacher of the Year - sec-ondary level, sponsored by Spring Lake Park Teachers United. Thompson is SLPHS girls’ basketball coach and in her fifth year of teaching at SLP. She has taught since 1998 in Minnesota school districts, including Detroit Lakes high and middle schools and Cherry and Greenway high schools. The Teacher of the Year will be announced May 1 at Northland Inn in Brooklyn Park. A team of 23 communi-ty leaders are reviewing the 108 candidate applications and in the next few weeks will name semifinalists fol-lowed by finalists. Education Minnesota represents 70,000 teach-ers, educational support professionals in Minnesota public school districts, state community and technology colleges and the University of Minnesota campuses in Duluth and Crookston. It also represents retired edu-cators and student teachers. The organization is affili-ated with the American Federation of Teachers, National Education Association and AFL-CIO. This marks the 47th annual Teacher of the Year Program. Elyse Kaner is at elyse.k a n e r @ e c m - i n c . c o m District 11 cuts $3.2 million ‘District 11’ continued on Page 8A Teachers, programs spared in latest budget trimming effort by Elyse Kaner Staff Writer Ah, the joy and perils of raising a child. Scott Kranz’s students know them well. Kids file into class fuss-ing over their babies. One student swaddles hers in a teal baby bunting. She props a yellow cap – com- plete with pom-pom – atop its head. She lifts it ador-ingly. Others ignore theirs. They look forward to final-ly untethering them – giving them the boot. “All right, let’s get the babies out,” Kranz yells to his students. He checks over each and every one carefully. A dog ate mine, says one student, showing her flour baby, all wrapped in plastic. It is the last day of an exper-iment Kranz has assigned for more than 10 years in his advanced placement psychol-ogy classes at Spring Lake Park High School. Advance placement psychology teacher Scott Kranz at Spring Lake Park High School checks over a flour baby as part of a student assignment teaching development and some serious duties of parenting. (Photo by Elyse Kaner) by Elyse Kaner Staff Writer Spring Lake Park School District 16 will host its first-ever information and enroll-ment evening next month. The event will take place Wednesday, Feb. 9. Stop by the District Services and Welcome Center anytime between 6:30 and 8 p.m. The center is located at 1415 81st Ave. N.E., Spring Lake Park. If you are considering enrolling your child in school and want to learn more about the district, this is your oppor-tunity to visit with school principals, Superintendent Jeff Ronneberg and program representatives. The district’s vision for the future is to be recog-nized as a world-class learn-ing community of choice aligned around improving student learning. District schools include: Northpoint Elementary (K-3), Blaine; Park Terrace Elementary (K-3), Spring Lake Park; Woodcrest Elementary (K-3), Fridley; Westwood Intermediate School (4-5); Westwood Middle School (6-8); Spring Lake Park High School (9-12) and the Learning Alternatives Community School. The SLP School District serves 5,000 students from the cities of Blaine, Spring Lake Park and Fridley. Among its innovative programs are personal-ized learning, technology-rich learning and teaching, half- and full-day Spanish Immersion kindergar-ten, Spanish Immersion Program at Westwood for kindergartners through second-graders and Spanish preschool. The district offers programs for the gift-ed and talented, online learning opportunities, Opportunities in Emergency Care, early childhood, ath-letics and other activities, such as music, dance line and theater. If parents wish to enroll their child, they may do so at this evening event. If you’d like a school tour, sign up for a spot for Tuesday, Feb. 15. or Thursday, Feb. 17. Call 763-786-5570 for more information Elyse Kaner is at elyse.k a n e r @ e c m - i n c . c o m District 16 will host enrollment, information event Students use ‘flour power’ to learn about parenting ‘Parenting’ continued on Page 8ADistrict 16 staffers vie for Teacher of Year Lori Thompson Magid Hart The Teacher of the Year Program, organized and underwritten by Education Minnesota, celebrates the tradition of excellence in education.The Teacher of the Year will be announced May 1 at Northland Inn in Brooklyn Park. AT A GLANCE Education is the best provision for old age. -Aristotle Blaine resident has unique TwinsFest perspective Blaine resident Mark Genosky is pleased TwinsFest 2011 is rolling into town, even though he won’t be helping fans live out their baseball broadcast fantasies. Genosky is a 1989 Blaine High School graduate. He’s been employed by the Minnesota Twins since 2007 and is the team’s game-day producer for radio broadcasts. When TwinsFest is held at the Metrodome, Genosky is responsible for running a booth where fans don a headset and microphone and do radio play-by-play. “That’s been taken off the table this year [in Blaine] because the event has been downsized,” Genosky said. “Basically, we cut an audio CD of a fan calling plays from a 10- or 12-play highlight package from the previous season. They have a chance to be John Gordon or Dan Gladden and call the radio play-by-play.” After graduating from BHS, Genosky attended college at Gustavus Adolphus in St. Peter. “I really wasn’t sure what my focus was going to be, and after some unique experi-ences and opportunities, I set-tled into the communications world, and actually carved out a niche with a broadcasting emphasis,” he said. For more about Genosky and TwinsFest, see Page 2A. Anoka County unveils highway plan Anoka County has unveiled its five-year highway improve-ment plan for 2011-2015. While 2011 highway proj-ects included in the plan have been approved by the Anoka County Board as part of its 2011 budget, improvements proposed for years 2012 through 2015 are for planning purposes only and have yet to receive an official stamp of approval from the board. For more about the high-way plan, see Page 3A. Newsstand $1.25 www.northfieldnews.com Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 8 Northfield Historical Society grows, 8B 8 Plans for Wabasha historic hotel, 3AGuggisberg resigns, 1B Northfield News [|xbIIGDJy00000lz[ Main Line: 507-645-5615 Newsroom: 507-645-1113Sports: 507-645-1111 8 Contact Us 8 Coming Up An adult club came to Owatonna. It set up business just off the interstate. Two North-field council members disagree on where such businesses should be located. 8 Deaths, 5A Find us on Facebook and become a fan. 8 Now on Facebook Northfield musician joins new band, 9A Carl Leidner, 75 Shane Meehan, 38 Shea Stremcha, 25 Take a video tour of the new-and-improved Scriver Build-ing, the home of the Northfield Historical Society. N On the Web A1A1 507-645-44781201 South Hwy. 3, Northfield“Northfield’s only locally owned new car dealership.” See Our EntireInventory of New & Pre-Owned at Dokmo.com Always Not ONE PRICE PriceYour open & closed TIMING RESTAURANTS IN NORTHFIELD 2004 1947 July 2010 2005 2004 Sept. 2010 2009 Jan. 2008 Feb. 2010 2008 Mar. 2011 2005 July 2011 Erbert & Gerbert’s Subs and Clubs Tiny’s Hot Dogs Tea Creations Froggy Bottoms River Pub Wendy’s Pan Pan International Café Butler’s Steak and Ale Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Kentucky Fried Chicken Ole Café 620 Grill Bittersweet Eatery Bittersweet Eatery March 2010 July 2010 in operation Sept. 2010 2010 in operation Nov. 2010 Jan. 2011 Jan., 2011 Feb., 2011 in operation June, 2011 in operationNorthfield News Graphic by Joni Berg Why do Northfield’s restaurants FAIL? Five reasons we can’t keep them in business WHY CAN’T WE GET A CHIPOTLE?REQUIREMENTS AND GENERAL LOCATION NEEDS• Urban and suburban with strong residential and daytime population. • Preferred generators include residential, office, retail, university, recreation and hospitals PREFERRED SITE CRITERIA• Urban storefronts, shopping center end-caps and pads, freestanding buildings • Current sizes range from 1,000 to 2,800 square feet depending on trade area characteristics• 25 feet minimum frontage• Patio seating preferred • Zoning to accommodate restaurant use and allow liquor license (beer & margaritas)• Parking adequate for restaurant use• Building exterior to allow Chipotle standard storefront design and signage• Excellent visibility and access BACK IN BUSINESS? The National Restaurant Association forecasts a positive growth for the nation in 2011, after three years of negative sales growth. According to its 2011 Restaurant Industry Forecast, our region is expected to see a 3.1 percent growth in sales this year.In food services and drinking places, Rice County employed, on average: 1781 in 2006 1967 in 2007 1332 in 2008 1585 in 2009 Progress Northfield News 2011 A rollercoaster year in Northfield Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 Portraits Northfield News 2011 Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 2131 in 2010* *Fourth quarter data not yet available, average of Q1 through Q3 — Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Quarterly Workforce Indicator — Source: Chipotle.com INSERTED IN THIS ISSUE By JACQUELINE A. [email protected] We’ve all had the same conversation.“What restaurant used to be there?” If you’ve been in Northfield long, it isn’t easy to recall all of the past and present restaurants in town. There has been a lot of movement in that sector in recent years. Behind each of those businesses are people who were willing to invest a lot of time, energy and of course, money, into their dream. Owners must juggle resources to keep each part of the business running smoothly, but consumers have to support them, too. Why can’t we — customers and entrepreneurs — keep them in business long-term? Business lessons Jennifer Torgrimson of Northfield had always been smart about her finances. She invested carefully and did her homework, but she knows now that frugality isn't always enough. See RESTAURANTS, 6AShutdown over: New budget cuts funding to schools, cities By SUZANNE ROOK, [email protected] and TIM PUGMIRE, MINNESOTa PUBlIc RadIO NEWS Gov. Mark dayton signed a series of budget bills Wednesday, ending a nearly three-week state government shutdown.Though Republicans passed the bud-get during a one-day special session, neither side has fully embraced the final product, which relies on borrowing and accounting measures. But both sides say they're glad the shutdown is over.dayton, who described the bills as the best option available, wanted an income tax increase on top earners, but Repub-licans refused. They eventually resolved the stalemate and resulting shutdown with a combination of tobacco bond bor- rowing and additional delayed state pay-ments to school districts.If the voters are angry about that, dayton said the blame falls squarely on the GOP. "I think the people of Minnesota should know that their preference is to borrow another $1.4 billion rather than raise taxes on millionaires and multi- millionaires,” dayton said. “They'll have to explain to the people of Minnesota why that is a better priority. I don't agree. I would not have voted for the tax bill if I were a legislator. But I signed it because otherwise Minnesota would not go back to work." Two of the area’s Republican legisla-tors, Rep. Kelby Woodard and Sen. al deKruif, see things differently.“I held my nose and voted for some-thing I don’t believe in,” deKruif said, ex-plaining his desire to get Minnesota back up and running. “This was the best deal the governor would agree to,” said Woodard.The deal shifts 40 percent of state aid payments to schools to the following year. Even with the planned repayment of a 30 percent shift from 2010-11, Northfield Superintendent chris Richardson says the district will receive $2.4 million less than it was promised in 2011-12. Rich-ardson says school officials will soon determine whether it needs to borrow to pay its bills. and that borrowing, he said, will cost the district money in the form of interest. charter schools will catch a break as the education bill assures they’ll be re-paid faster than non-charters.The upside, said Richardson, is that the education bill signed Wednesday no longer allows the state to temporarily withhold payments when it gets low on cash. Twice in the last couple of years, the Woodard Dekruif Dayton See BUDGET, 10A By Suzanne [email protected] For years, whenever his family would gather in front of the television, Shea Stremcha would be focused on his sketchbook. as they watched TV, S t r emc h a’s father, Jeff S t r e m c h a said, his y o u n g e s t son would be drawing, filling one bound pad after another with an array of images: designs, cars, creatures, people. Family and friends say Stremcha, 25, wasn’t just creative, but that he also overflowed with energy and enthusiasm. “He had a zest for life,” Jeff Stremcha said of his son who was shot and killed early Wednesday in an apparent home invasion at the south Minneapolis home he shared with his fiancée, ashley Faeth. On Friday, police arrested a 23-year-old man and a 27-year-old man in connection with the 2004 Northfield High School graduate’s death. The two were booked into Hennepin county Jail where they wait for investigators to take their case to the county attorney for possible charges.Police haven’t speculated on what motivated the killing. Jesse Stremcha, the oldest of the Stremcha siblings, remembers his brother as a young man who loved motorcycles and cars — especially a 1979 Trans am nicknamed “The Bandit” that he restored. along with their father, the two brothers enjoyed visiting the North Shore, hiking on the Superior Trail and annual motorcycle trips. Recently the three rode to Memphis, Tenn. Police arrest 2 in Northfield man’s death See ARREST, 5A Stremcha
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 8 Weeklies over 5,000–22 entries First Place: Winona Post Extremely solid and consistent coverage of hard news with good mix of topics. Generally well-written with straightforward but effective hooks and thorough exploration of news issues. Second Place: Hutchinson Leader The March 10 edition is an absolute standout for pooling resources to provide exhaustive coverage of a huge story—one that many of these others wouldn’t have even recognized as such. Other editions were also solid. Dailies under 10,000–9 entries First Place: Owatonna People’s Press Lots of local coverage on the section fronts reinforces the notion that this is your hometown paper. Vibrant use of picture, graphics and other design elements that draw readers in without overwhelming them. Story subject matters also are timely and interesting, with a nice mix. Overall, a very warm and inviting paper. Second Place: The Bemidji Pioneer Another example of a local newspaper reinforcing that message with its stories. Lots of locally-produced copy on the section fronts. The stories also consist of a nice mix of hard and soft subject matters that offer a variety of articles for the paper’s readers. Overall, the Pioneer is doing a nice job of being the voice of its community. Dailies 10,000 and over–8 entries First Place: The Free Press, Mankato The Free Press is well laid out, with a good mixture of local and national stories. An excellent use of graphics and breakout box keeps the reader invested in reading. Second Place: West Central Tribune, Willmar A lot of information is packed into the West Central Tribune. There is a lot of art on each page, but it is well organized and leads the reader through the page. General Reporting CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE OPINION A4 // OBITUARIES A5 // COMMUNITY A6 // BUSINESS A7 // COMICS A8 // SPORTS B1-3 // CLASSIFIEDS B4-9 INDEX MATINEE WIN Owatonna wins rare afternoon game See page B1 $1.25 Newsstand Sunday February 6, 2011 owatonna.com Vol. 97 No. 31 28 Pages Three Sections OUTSIDE LIFESTYLE Chance of Snow High 27 • Low 8 Local weather — Page B9 Antidote to the hum drum • In today’s People’s Press Sears moves operations to new location. • BUSINESS, A7 On the move INSIDE Annual cancer auction draws hundreds, raises thousands. • LOCAL NEWS, A2 A good cause [|xbIDFDCy00010nzW 5:30 p.m. today on Fox ARLINGTON, TEXAS Ashley Peterson/People’s Press Nick’s Pizza owner, George Marazes, presents a piping hot pizza order Friday night at the downtown Owatonna pizzeria. Marazes is prepared for a busy Super Bowl Sunday, as pizza is the most popular game day food across the nation. SLICE OF THE PIE Local pizzerias are gearing up for a rush during the Super Bowl, one of the five biggest days of the year for the industry. LOCAL PREDICTIONS Readers cast their votes for their picks to win Super Bowl XLV in owatonna.com online poll. OPINION, A4 GAME DAY FAVORITES Let us know what your favorite part of Super Bowl Sunday is: The game, the food, the parties or the ads. Weigh in on our online poll at owatonna.com. SPORTS, B1 By ASHLEY PETERSON • [email protected] Having a Midwest team — Minnesota’s biggest rivals none the less — competing in the Super Bowl means even more pizza orders than if two far away teams were duel-ing in the big game.“A lot of times, how busy we are on Super Bowl Sunday depends on if there’s a Mid-west team,” said Buck’s Pizza owner Rick Culver. “We find it’s busier when someone from our region is playing. With Green Bay in the game, it will be busier. There’s just not quite as much interest when teams included in the bowl are all from far away.”Culver said he is anticipating Super Bowl Sunday to be quite busy for the pizza par-lor. “We have heard a lot of people talking about the game, not necessarily planning huge parties, but we still expect a rush of pizza orders during the game,” he said.The local Domino’s has scheduled its en-tire staff to battle the bowl rush tonight.“As far as I understand, we’re planning on it being very, very busy. It’s either regular business or very busy on Super Bowl Sun-day,” manager Steve Dausey said. “We’ll be delivering all day. Basically everyone who works here is going to be working tomor-row.” At the Domino’s Pizza chain, officials ex-pect to deliver more than nine million slices of pizza across the country on Super Bowl Sunday. While deliveries are high, eat-ins tend to be slow, since most pizza lovers are glued to TVs and sofas at home.“Super Bowl Sunday is usually a little busier, but business is less people coming in, more deliveries going out,” local Pizza Ranch owner Mark Stevens said. “We usu-ally are OK with delivery numbers because a lot of people in store can deliver also, in-cluding our kitchen staff.” While area cheese heads have their sights set on the Packers defeating the Steelers, local pizzerias have cheesy priorities of their own — delivering hundreds of pizzas to hungry fans in the Owatonna area. With the big bowl kickoff slated for 5:30 p.m., pizza prep begins long before the first down for pizza places to complete the deliveries that are in high demand during the game. By ASHLEY [email protected] OWATONNA — For some football fanatics, Super Bowl Sunday might as well be a national holiday. For local gro-cers, game day brings business comparable to the biggest eat-ing holiday of all, Thanksgiv-ing. “We’re always busy on Sat-urdays. People buy groceries when they’re not working, but Super Bowl Sunday tends to be the busiest day of the week. Over the past history, you can look at it as — basically up until kick off — they’re lined up from breakfast until then,” local Hy-Vee manager of store operations Paul Blomberg said. “The Super Bowl kicks in and the analogy we make is like Thanksgiving — it hits and it’s empty isles. Even if they don’t care about football, people are watching the game.” Blomberg said Super Bowl Sunday is second in grocery sales, behind only Thanksgiv-ing. “It’s good to have sales in the middle of winter, and good to have Green Bay in the game, because it adds a little more lo-cal flavor,” he added.Cash Wise assistant manag-er Greg Larson said the snack aisle was busiest as shoppers went about Saturday after-noon. “It’s pizzas and pop and munchies and the biggest guacamole consumption day of the year, I believe,” Larson said. With the salty snack goods on the forefront of Super Bowl party lineups, Blom-berg agreed chips, salsa and “all the snacky things” are the most popular items sold on Super Bowl Sunday. He anticipates today’s rush will begin late this morning.“You got your people who go to church, so it’s slow un-til about 9:30 or 10 a.m. Then you put your running shoes on and that goes for about six hours and then you all take a collective heave, a sigh of relief and put the store back together at night,” Blomberg said. “It’s a feeding frenzy. It’s amazing.” Area grocers prepare for game day ‘feeding frenzy’ Ashley Peterson/People’s Press Blooming Prairie resident Dan Gabriel stocks up Saturday afternoon for Super Bowl Sunday, when he and his wife will be celebrating both the game and a belated Christmas with more than 30 family members in Chatfield, Minn. See PIE page A3 See FRENZY page A2 By JEFFREY [email protected] OWATONNA — Owatonna’s history has become part of na-tional history. After more than four years since the process began, the city’s West Hills Complex — the site of the former Minnesota State Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children — has been named to the National Register of Historic Places. “I’m so thrilled,” Harvey Ronglien, a former resident of the orphanage, said about the news of state school’s designa-tion on the National Register, his eyes moist with tears. Ronglien, along with his wife Maxine, were instrumental in preserving the history of the orphanage, in developing the city’s orphanage museum and in helping to secure the state school’s place on the National Register. In a letter to city and council officials, Britta Bloomberg, the deputy state historic preserva-tion officer, congratulated those involved in the process for their work in securing the National Register designation.“The National Register, as you know, is a listing of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects considered to be worthy of preservation,” Bloomberg wrote in the letter dated Jan. 10. “…By recognizing the signifi-cance of your property and plan-ning for its preservation, you are participating in a national move-ment which aims to preserve, for the benefit of future generations, our cultural heritage.” Specifically, the National Reg-ister designated the area as the Minnesota State School for De-pendent and Neglected Children Historic District and cited the district as being culturally and historically significant because it is “associated with events that have made a significant contribu-tion to the broad patterns of our history.” Susan Roth, the National Reg-ister Historian for the state, said Friday that the state school — and hence the property on which it sat — was historically significant because of the role it played in the post-Civil War development of the nation’s views of care and welfare of children, especially those that had been orphaned or neglected. “The school was in the fore-front of child welfare for the en-tire country,” Roth said. “It took the discussion of child welfare to a national level.” Although the entire state school campus is now on the National Register, it is not the first time the school — or at least part of it — has been recognized by the Register. The main building of the West Hills Complex, which now houses city administrative offices, the orphanage museum and the Owatonna Arts Center, has been on the National Register since 1975, shortly after the City of Owatonna purchased the land from the State of Minnesota in 1974.“One of the smartest things the City of Owatonna has ever done was to purchase this property,” Maxine Ronglien said.In late 2006, the orphanage museum board began consider-ing the possibility of seeking the National Register designation for the entire 42-acre tract, which in-cludes 31 structures, 18 of which are original. The museum board approached the city’s West Hills Commission in January 2007 and received the commission’s sup-port to seek the designation. West Hills complex added to Register See REGISTER page A3 2 FANS, 2 TEAMS, 1 BIG GAME Owatonna may be Vikings’ territory, but we managed to find both a Packers and a Steelers fan to talk about their teams’ chances. ONLINE BREAKING DOWN THE SUPER BOWL How do these two legendary teams match up? From the sidelines to the end zone, we have the complete guide to Green Bay and Pittsburgh. SPORTS, B3 Boys, girls hockey teams lose Saturday. • SPORTS, B1 Rough ice Judge orders mediation in SweeTango apple suit. • BUSINESS, A7 Juicy lawsuit September 12, 2010 www.mankatofreepress .com 40 pages Volume 124, No. 161 $1.75 S E RV I N G M A N K AT O A N D S O U T H - C E N T R A L M I N N E S O TA Inaugural event a smash ... Page B1 SPORTS, PAGE D1 Mavericks hold off Northern State S U N D AY WEATHER, PAGE D8 Does it get better? Sunny with a high of 76. Clear tonight. Low around 50. TOMORROW IN THE FREE PRESS Graif thriving Men’s clothing store owner has seen city center come full circle. We want your photos Do you have a photo you wo uld like to share with everyone? Now you can become part of The Free Press by sending th ose photos to us to include in our new Web fe ature, “My Perspective.” Send your phot o to readerpho- [email protected] Photos will appear on our “My Perspecti ve” slide show at www.mankatofreepress.com/ photos_videos. Include a title in the subject line and a brief description (including the ph otographer’s name). One photo per e-mail , please. Mankato, Minnesota Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F1-F4 Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2 Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . C 5-C7 Nation-World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A3 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D 1-D7 TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E 7, E8 Your Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . C 1-C4 Copyright 2010,The Free Press Co. NATION & WORLD, PAGE A3 Unsettled nation marks 9/11 UPCOMING PAGEFINDER By Robb Murray [email protected] MANKATO — Blue Earth County authorities broke their silence on the Lake Crystal homicide Saturday, revealing a few new details about the case not included in court documents filed Friday. Jennifer Nibbe, who was charged Friday with second- degree murder, was arrested in the parking lot of her employer, the Mankato Surgery Center, authorities said. She had not, however, turned herself in. She will make her first court appear- ance Monday. Authorities also said James Nibbe, who was shot in the head while he slept, was aware of the insurance policy his wife had pur- chased in the event of his death. No other arrests are imminent, and authorities do not suspect Nibbe’s son had any involvement. Investigators were at the Nibbes’ home until Wednesday. Capt. Rich Murry said they pulled a lot of physical evidence from the house and will have it analyzed by the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Murry said he expects it to take weeks before the analysis is complete. “This is not done by a long shot,” Murry said. “There’s lots of work to be done.” Among the evidence is more than a dozen fin- gerprints, gunshot residue samples taken from Jennifer Nibbe, DNA swabs from Jennifer Nibbe, knife, rope, shotgun shells, shotgun, bloodspatter samples, cell phone, spiral notebook, hair samples. Jennifer Nibbe made a frantic 911 call Aug. 31 say- ing her husband had been Eagle Lake Janesville Waseca Nicollet Courtland New Ulm N 14 14 14 14 2000 - 1 2001 - 4 2002 - 1 2003 - 2 2004 - 3 2005 - 1 2006 - 1 2007 - 3 2008 - 5 2009 - 1 2010 - 3 Highway 14 fatalities New Ulm to Waseca from 2000 to 2010 J. MalmangerS ource: MN Dot/MN State Patrol By Mark Fischenich mf [email protected] It’s somewhere north of 11,0 00, the number of trips Bryan Cl ancy has taken on Highway 14 bet ween New Ulm and North Mankat o. One 25-mile eastbound drive in the morning, a westbound re turn in the afternoon. “I live on Highway 14,” Clan cy said. “I kind of call it the Buf falo Trail. It’s just a slow-moving path.” Trying to change that for the last several decades have bee n local leaders, state lawmaker s, members of Congress. Dozen s have come and gone, all pled ging to make Highway 14 funding a top priority, but 24 miles of the p ath between North Mankato and New Ulm remains two lanes. In recent years, that two-lane Frustrated legislators run into MnDOT roadblock By Mark Fischenich mf [email protected] MANKATO — After decade s of beg- ging, advocates for an unbro ken stretch of four-lane expressw ay from New Ulm to Rochester tried bellicosity during the 2010 legislative se ssion. Imploring the Minnesota Department of Transportatio n to put the project on its constructio n sched- ule hadn’t worked, so lawma kers along the Highway 14 corridor trie d order- ing MnDOT to do it. “I don’t prefer this type of ap proach for funding projects, but I be lieve this has become our only choice,” said Sen. Kathy Sheran, DFL-Mankato , in explaining her bill to the Sen ate Transportation Committee o n March 11. “... My constituents don’t accept the solution that gives MnDO T the DECADE OF DEATH John Cross Bryan Clancy has been driving h is 18-wheeler on Highway 14 bet ween New Ulm and North Manka to twice daily for more than two decades. During that time, he’s witnessed countless accidents on the increasingly b usy road and fruitless attempts to get it expanded to fo ur lanes. H ighway 14 has a fatal accident rate 94 percent higher than the state average. There have been 25 fatalities on the mostly two-lane road in the last decade from New Ul m to Waseca. Still, it did not make the Mn DOT list for work anytime in the next 20 years, while safer roads are scheduled for im- provements simply because they meet MnDOT priorities of preservation and reducing co ngestion. Some people are trying to ch ange that. Please see TRUCKS, Page A7 Please see MNDOT, Page A6 More trucks, more traff ic make road more dangerous A SPECIAL REPORT Highway 14 motorists have been waiting years for safe ty improvements Jennifer Nibbe to make fir st court appearance Mond ay; no other arrests immin entPress conference provides more deta ils on homicide investigation Please see INVESTIGATION, Page A6
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 9  Weeklies up to 1,500–6 entries First Place: Le Sueur News-Herald Head and shoulders above the rest. Love the player profiles and agate-style left column on the fronts. Writing is good. A wide range of sports covered. Second Place: Ely Timberjay Clearly a top choice, with excellent writing and excellent use of photos, especially the skiing. A really nice job. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–8 entries First Place: St. Peter Herald Very nice section. Love the player profiles (a very good idea). Writing is crisp. Second Place: Pelican Rapids Press Solid writing in a very close category. Photos really help presenta- tion. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–13 entries First Place: Litchfield Independent Review Great sports section. Solid reporting. Good coverage of a variety of sports, and mix of local, regional and national coverage. Clean, eye-appealing design and good photos to supplement stories. Second Place: Northfield News Interesting features and sidebars, solid reporting, and great visuals, to boot. Weeklies over 5,000–8 entries First Place: Minnetonka/Deephaven/Hopkins Sun Sailor Love the Stars of the Week feature. Side bars enhance sports page content. Crisp photos. Excellent writing and reporting. Second Place: Edina Sun Current The regular Looking Ahead sidebar is great. Fantastic coverage of local sports; the reporter is everywhere from football games to bowling league. Also, some solid photography. Sports Reporting CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  Sports This Week What’s on deck Thursday, Jan. 13 Girls Basketball, LSH hosts Holy Family Catholic; A,B,9; 7:30/6:00/4: 30. At Hilltop Boys Hockey at Waseca, 7:30 p.m. Girls Hockey at Dodge County, 7:30 p.m. JV at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 14 Boys Basketball hosts Belle Plaine at LSH High School. A/B /9; 7:30/6:00/4:30. Boys Basketball, 7 & 8 at Belle Plaine. 4:15/5:15. Girls Basketball hosts Le Center at Hilltop; A/B, 7:30/6:00 Girls Basketball, 9th grade hosts St. Clair at Hilltop. 4:30 p.m. Wrestling hosts Sibley East at LSH MIDDLE school gym. 7 p.m.; JV sta rts at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 15 Boys Basketball 8th grade: at Nor- wood Young America Tourney; 7 :30 a.m., 7:45 pick up in Henderson. Boys Basketball 7th grade: at Sib- ley East Tourney, 8 a.m. Boys and Girls IM Basketball - 8 a.m. HS and MS gyms. Boys Hockey, varsity at Redwood Valley, 3 p.m. JV starts at 1 p .m. Girls Hockey hosts Minnehaha Academy at 2 p.m.. Le Sueur Co m- munity Center. Wrestling, varsity at Le Center Tourney, 10:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 17 NO SCHOOL Girls Basketball, at Sibley East, A/ B/9; 7:30/6:00/4:30 Girls Hockey at Willmar, 7 p..m. JV starts at 5. Tuesday, Jan. 18 Boys Basketball, 7th and 8th grade host St. Peter @ Park Elementa ry. 4:15/5:15 Girls Basketball at Norwood Young America; A/B/9; 7:30/6:00. Girls Basketball, 7th and 8th host NYA at LSH Middle School gy m; 4:15/5:15. Boys Hockey host Sleepy Eye Public, 7 p.m. Le Sueur Commun ity Cente. Boys Hockey, JV at Albert Lea, 5:30 p.m. Giants to host Hall of Fame, Alumni Event The Giants Wrestling program will host the Fourth Annual Hall of Fame Induction and Alumni Event at 5:30 p.m. Friday at the Le Sueur-Henderson High School. This year’s inductees include the 1972 Team, Kevin Slack-class of 1971, Ron Regan-class of 1963, Lee Thelemann-class of 1972, Rick Rogich-class of 1991, Lyle Felmlee-class of 1960 and Jake Kamps-class of 1994. The Giants will host Sibley East in a dual following the induction ceremony. The event is open to the public with a social to follow at The Bar. Scoreboard Sports & Outdoors BSectionWednesday, January 12, 2011 www.lesueurnews-herald.com Le Sueur News-Herald LE SUEUR CLASSIC LEAGUE January 5, 2011 Third Quarter Standings Pts. W Avg . The 300 Club 47 10 28 Schultz’s Painting 43 10 23 HomeTown Bank 37 10 30 Kahle’s Constr. 34 10 41 Odenthal Meats 33 10 45 Next Generation 31 10 31 Moske’s Auto #1 17 10 37 High Team Game — HomeTown Bank 1191, The 300 Club 1179, N ext Generation 1145. High Team Series —HomeTown Bank 3253, The 300 Club 3239, K ah- le’s Construction 3234. High Individual Game — John Becker 246, Dan Berndt 243, D an Heldeberg 225. High Individual Series —Dan Berndt 690, Dan Heldberg 638, Ba rry Kahle 593. LE SUEUR CITY LEAGUE January 3, 2011 Third Quarter Standings Pts. W Avg . Moriarty Painting 41 10 45 Nick Jones LawnCare 36 10 27 The Canopy Group 35 10 39 Genesis 25.5 10 35 The 300 Club 25 10 46 Moske’s Auto #2 12 10 32 High Team Game — Moriarty Painting 1100, The Canopy Gro up 1098, The 300 Club 1064. High Team Series — The Canopy Group 3187, Moriarty Painting 31 56, The 300 Club 3149. High Individual Game — Jeremy Foskett 258, Gary Thelemann 2 43, Nick Jones 234. High Individual Series – Gary Thelemann 682, Justin Wilke 6 32, Tom Doheny 620. LADIES NITE OUT December 30, 2010 W L Won The 300 Club 4 0 32 Party Balls 4 0 34 HomeTown Bank 3 1 30 LS Downtown Motel 3 1 24 Green Mill Bar 1 3 47 Quality Home Impr. 1 3 23 Next Generation 0 0 35 High Team Series — LS Down- town Motel 2446, The 300 Club 239 9. High Team Game — Green Mill 855, LS Downtown Motel 834. High Individual Series — Jean Teschendorf 518, Tess Plonske 498 . High Individual Game — Becky Michels 203, Tess Plonske 191. Photos by Pat Beck Le Sueur-Henderson sophomore C hris Pfarr takes down St. Peter fre shman Collin Thompson. Pfarr wo n a 19-6 major decision. By Jennifer Wilson Correspondent Wrestling brothers Brent and Mark O’Connell and Brett and Chris Pfarr led Le Sueur-Henderson past St. Peter with four wins accumulating for 12 of the Giants’ 32 total team points in Saturday’s match. The Giants won 39-27. Chris Pfarr got the Giants on the board at 130 pounds with a major decision 19-6. He was followed by Brent O’Connell at 135 pounds with a 5-2 decision. “Both Chris and Brent are really getting their games together. They have their minds made up to win so their training in the practice room has been stellar and they are becoming very aware of their position on the mat to the point where their Giants beat Saints, prepare for busy week LSH junior Brent O’Connell (top) tu rns over St. Peter senior Dakota Haslip. O’Connell w on 5-2. See Wrestling Page 8B By Pat Beck [email protected] LE SUEUR — Applying almost continuous pressure, Mankato East/Loyola (10-5- 1) shut out Le Sueur- H e n d e r - s o n / S t . P e t e r / Montgom- ery-Lon- s d a l e / Cleveland girls hock- ey team 8- 0 Tuesday. T h e C o u g a r s out shot the Bulldogs 4 3 - 1 0 . Bulldogs goalie Kirst- en Shaugh- nessy made 35 saves, w h i l e Cougars netminder Melany Anderson blocked all 10 shots on goal. The Bulldogs were without leading defender Ali Plieseis who is out with mono. Eighth-grade forward Re- bekah Kolstad scored a hat trick, and sophomore center Savannah Quandt and Mariah Kragh scored two goals apiece. Quandt also had three assists. Junior forward Sarah Bies- terveld scored the other goal. The Cougars scored three goals in the first two perio ds and two in the third period with running time because of a six- goal lead. Bulldogs 1, Fairmont 0 FAIRMONT — Center Chelsea Kaelberer scored the goal, assisted by wing Elle Hammes, and goalie Kirsten Shaughnessy stopped all 17 shots on goal Thursday night as the Bulldogs shut out Fair- mont. Kaelberer scored the goal, her third of the season, 7 min- utes into the first period. Th e Bulldogs had 45 shots on goal, and Fairmont goalie Jess Wie- derhoeft saved 44 of them. Fairmont fell to 1-5-1 over- all and 0-3 in the South Central Conference. Bulldogs 2, Luverne 1 LE SUEUR — Wing Libby McCoy had a goal and an as- sist Saturday as the Bulldogs sweep a season series against Luverne 2-1. McCoy ranks second on the team with sev- en goals, four assists and 11 points. Linemate Elle Hammes, who led the Bulldogs with 10 goals, six assists and 16 points, had the other goal for the Bull- dogs. Center Danielle Wilmes and defender Liz Weiers each notched an assist. Shaughnessy made 19 saves in the nets to get the win. Luverne dropped to 3-8. Cougars pounce on Lady Bulld ogs 8-0 Bulldogs Girls Hockey Player profile: Danielle Wilmes Grade: 8 Position: C Key stats: 4 goals, 3 assists Record: 7-5-1 Next action: 7: p.m. Thursday at Dodge County Photos by Pat Beck Bulldog defenders Kelsey Skelly (lef t) and Elizabeth Weiers and Mankat o East/Loyola for- ward Rebekah Kolstad bat tle for a flying puck Tuesda y at Le Sueur Community C enter. Bulldogs seventh-grade forward Maddie Kleschultz breaks away from Mankato East/L oyola sophomore for- ward Maddie McCargar. By Paul M. Malchow pmalchow@lesueurnews- herald.com GAYLORD – Logic would indicate you would have a better chance of winning a basketball game scoring 68 points rather than 41. But the Le Sueur-Henderson boys bas- ketball team defied that log ic, beating Blue Earth Area 41-38, and losing to Sibley East 70- 68. On Jan. 4 the Giants made the long bus trip to Blue Earth. “We have always struggled down in Blue Earth so getting a win was big for us,” said LS- H Coach Robert Steiger. At first it looked like points would not be a problem for the Giants as they jumped out to a quick 12-5 lead. The game plan was to work the ball in- side against BEA, but the Gi- ants had difficulties convertin g. Still, LS-H and built a 10-point, 23-13 lead at the half. “We played well defen- sively throughout the game and rebounded well in the fi rst half,” Steiger said. “Our posts struggled to score, missing 15 shots from five feet in. T hat made the game too much of a struggle.” BEA began to find its shoot- ing touch in the second half and with four minutes remain- ing in the game the score was tied at 35. Jack Fraser gave the Giants the lead for good with a big three-point basket. Fraser led LS-H in scoring with 14 points. Christian Dw- yer and Chance Wigand each added eight. Bobby Rose had eight rebounds – all coming in the second half. Brendan Kroehler also picked off seven boards. The Giants played another road game on Jan. 6 at Gaylord against conference rival Sibley East. Last year the Wolverines over-powered LS-H and the Giants were looking to return the favor. Slow starts have been the Achilles heel for LS-H this year and the issue continued to plague them in Gaylord. In short order, the Giants found themselves behind 13-5. “We spent the rest of the game playing catch-up,” Steiger la- mented after the game. “We tied the score twice, but never quite took control of the game. We never quite matched the in- tensity of our defense at Blue Earth and had trouble com- ing up with the big defensive stop.” Dwyer and Fraser com- bined for 20 points in the fi rst half and LS-H had trimmed the Wolverine lead to four as the teams went into the locker room. The final 18 minutes were tense for both sides. Wigand had a big second half with nine points Fraser hit four three- pointers to keep the game close. “We missed seven free throws that ended up dooming us at the end,” Steiger said. “When we did hold them scoreless for a few possessions we had trou- ble scoring ourselves.” Fraser finished the game with 24 points. Wigand scored 13 to go with five rebounds. J oe Hank tallied 10 points. Dwyer had nine points and five stea ls. Rose again led the Giants in re- bounding with nine. On Jan. 11 LS-H attempted to improve their conference record at Montgomery-Lons- dale. Results of that game were not available at press time. On Jan. 14 the Giants finally p lay a home game, facing Belle Plaine. Boys split 2 basketball nail-biters By Pat Beck [email protected] ST. PETER — Powered by pins by Chris P e t t i s , J a k e A n d e r - berg and S t e v e n P e t t i s , St. Peter w r e s - t l i n g t e a m o p e n e d the South C e n t r a l Confer- e n c e s c h e d - ule with a 39-21 win over Fairmont Thursday night. The Saints jumped to a 18-0 lead on a pin by Chris Pettis at 103 pounds and two forfeits. Then after a close 2-1 decision by Fairmont senior Cody Olson over St. Peter freshman Collin Thompson at 119, the Saints won five straight with pins by Ander-berg at 135 and Steve Pet-tis at 140 and decisions by Dakota Haslip 7-3 at 130, Kyle Bosacker 8-4 at 145 and Ashton Bartlett 4-0 at 152 to give the Saints an in-surmountable 36-6 lead with five matches to go. St. Peter 39, Fairmont 21103 - Chris Pettis, SP, pin Chris Krenz 2:57 112- Cody Kurth, SP, won by forfeit119- Hunter Retzlaff, SP, won by forfeit 125- Cody Olson, F, dec. Collin Thompson 2-1130- Dakota Haslip, SP, dec. Joe Weber 7-3 135- Jake Anderberg, SP, pin Mason Ochsendor 0:44140- Steven Pettis, SP, pin Devon Ford 4:30 145-Kyle Bosacker SP, pin Spencer Meadows 8-4 152- Ashton Bartlett, SP, dec. Kory Brown 4-0 160- Talor Fritz, F, dec. Tanner McLain 9-8 171- Marcus Asmus, F, dec. Bennett Baker 8-4 189- Andy Sanden, F, dec. Cody Juell 6-1 215- Jovon Ramos, F, dec. Dylan Connor 11-8 HWT. -Colton Hines, F, won by forfeit Saints hold on to take down Cards 39-21 Herald Huddle Week Ahead Inside Sports Girls basketball ups to 9-0..8B B SectionThursday, January 13, 2011 Sportswww.stpeterherald.com St. Peter Herald Twins Winter Caravan in Mankato Jan. 27 The Minnesota Twins Cara-van will be stopping in Mankato at the Kato Ballroom Jan. 27.Here’s the line-up: JOHN GORDON - Official Voice of the Twins. TONY OLIVIA - Legend-ary Twins Hall of Famer.GLEN PERKINS - Left Handed Pitcher. BEN REVERE - Big Pros-pect and Outfielder TREVOR PLOUFFE - In Field Utility Player. and TC BEAR. Buy tickets at the KTOE stu-dios or at the door; $5 for chil-dren $8 for adults. The Caravan features stops in nearly 60 communities throughout Twins Territory from Jan. 17 to Jan. 31. The fi-nal stop will be Jan. 31 in New Prague, with Danny Valencia and Jack Morris. The Caravan features teams of current and former players visiting schools, hospitals, corporations and ser-vice clubs during the day with a traditional “hot stove” program each evening. Anthony Ford Pond Hockey Tournament On Jan. 22 the Anthony Ford Memorial Pond Hockey Tour-nament will take action. From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Westward Marina on Lake Washington participants have a three-game guarantee in three divisions of: Youth, Women’s and Men’s. There are no goalies with the maximum of players per team six and the minimum four. Enter before Dec. 30 and get $25 off. The regular fee is $250 for adults (3-on-3 play) and $150 for youth (4-on-4 play). To register call 507-385-6287, E-mail [email protected] The AF99 Committee and the Mankato Area Hockey As-sociation thanks you for your tremendous support of the youth hockey program in the greater Mankato area through the “Anthony Ford Fund.” Big bobber ice fish contest set Feb. 5 Feb. 5 is Minnesota State University’s Big Bobber Ice Fishing Contest on Lake Wash-ington near Westwood Marina. Event proceeds will benefit the MSU Athletic Scholarship Fund. Thursday, Jan. 13SP Wrestling at WEM Triangular ..............5:00Bulldogs B. Hockey at Waseca .................7:30Bulldogs G. Hockey vs. at Dodge County 7:30SP Boys Basketball at St. James ..............7:30SP G. Basketball vs. St. James .................7:30Friday, Jan. 14GAC Swimming vs. Carleton .....................5:00SP Gymnastics vs. Blue Earth Area .........6:30SP Wrestling at Blue Earth Area ................7:00GAC W. Hockey vs. Trinity (CONN.) ........7:00GAC M. Hockey at Augsburg ...................7:05Saturday, Jan. 15SP Gymnastics at Glencoe-Silver Lake ..9:00GAC W. Basketball vs. Carelton ...............1:00Bulldogs G. Hockey vs. Minnehaha ........2:00GAC Gymnastics vs. UW-Oshkosh ........2:00Bulldogs B. Hcokey at Redwood Valley ..3:00GAC M. Basketball vs. Carleton ................3:00GAC M. Hockey vs. Augsburg ..................7:05GAC Nordic Skiiing NCAA Qualifier at DuluthSunday, Jan. 16GAC Nordic Skiiing NCAA Qualifier at Dulut hMonday, Jan. 17SP G. Basketball at Lake Crystal .............7:30GAC M. Basketball vs. Augsburg .............7:30GAC M. Basketball vs. Ausgburg .............7:30Tuesday, Jan. 18SP Wrestling vs. Waseca. Mankato East 5:00Bulldogs B. Hockey vs. Sleepy Eye .........7:00 Photos by Pat Beck St. Peter senior captain Dakota Haslip takes control of Fairmont freshman Joe Weber in the 130-pound match. Haslip won 7-3. Photos by Kurt Hildebrandt St. Peter’s Pace Maier (5) drives around Fairmont’s Ben Kain (5) during South Central boys basketball action Saturday night. By Kurt [email protected] St. Peter’s boys basketball t e a m notched its third S o u t h Central Confer- e n c e win in t h r e e t r i e s with a thrilling 6 3 - 5 6 o v e r - t i m e win over F a i r - m o n t on Sat- u r d a y n i g h t on the Saints’ h o m e court. “This was a good win for us tonight and even though we gave up the lead in the second half we came on strong in overtime and kept our composure,” St. Peter coach Kelly Raymond said. “Give Fairmont a lot of cred-it because they caught fire a bit toward the end of regu-lation and tied the game up. We had a little problem with their press and turned the ball over. “Fairmont is always a good team and anytime you can pick up a win against them you have to be happy about it and build on it from there.” St. Peter improved to 3-0 in SCC play and 5-3 overall with the victory. They return to action on Thursday when they travel to St. James in a battle of Saints in another crucial conference matchup.Against Fairmont, the Saints stormed out to a 15-point lead midway through the second half with guard Josh Leonard helPeterping out the cause with a pair of long-range three pointers. However, the Cardinals kept chipping away at the lead the rest of the night before Fair- mont guard Max Waletich tied it up with 13 seconds left at 49-49 with a three-point shot. St. Peter had once last possession in regulation, but couldn’t get a decent shot off. In the overtime, the Saints went on a 9-2 run over the opening two minutes to build a 58-51 lead which they would never relinquish the rest of the extra session to pull out the win. Pace Maier, Ben Rosburg, Joey Bartlett and Chad Poppen all hit key free throws down the stretch as the Saints ended up hit-ting 8 of 10 free throws in the overtime period. “Our kids really kept their composure in overtime and it Saints topple Cards in OT thriller 63-56 Saints Boys Basketball Player profile:Peter Kruize Grade: 10 Position: C Key stats: 16 points, 16 rebounds vs. Fairmont Record: 5-3 overall, 3-0 SCC Next action: 7:30 p.m. Thursday vs. St. James St. Peter’s Chad Poppen puts up a shot over a Fair-mont defender during the Saints 63-56 overtime win Saturday night. Saints Wrestling Player profile:Kyle Bosacker Grade: 9 Weight: 145 Record: 10-3 Team: 5-8 overall, 1-0 SCC Next action: 5 p.m. Thursday at WEM Triangular with Madelia See Wrestling, Page 3B See Boys Basketball, Page 2B By Pat Beck [email protected] 9 . 5 , 9.45, 9.6 and 9.5. T h o s e were the w i n n i n g scores in the highly competi- tive 22nd a n n u a l Gustavus Gymnas- tics Invi- t a t i o n a l Saturday at the Lund Center. 6.5, 7.2, 6.5 and 8.6 were St. Peter’s top scores.The difference in the scores is mainly because of the higher skill levels of the opposing teams, which are some of the best in the state. While the Saints won’t reach the level of the top teams in the state, they hope to close the gap in upcoming meets.Eagan, the No. 1 ranked team Class AA in the state, won the meet with 145.55 points. St. Peter finished eighth out of eight teams with 101.5 points.That’s an improvement over the Saints’ season opener when they scored 99.95. “It was good to be over 100,” St. Peter coach Stacy Kurth said. “That’s nice to see, Saints gymnasts strive higher Saints Gymnastics Player profile: Megan Overgaard Grade: 8 Key stats: 15th (8.6) on vault Record: 0-2 Next action: 6:30 p.m. Friday vs. Blue Earth Photos by Pat Beck St. Peter sophomore Erin Krenik starts her dismount on the balance beam Saturday at the 22nd Annual Gustavus Gymnastics Invitational. She scored 6.95 in placing 28th. See Gymnastics, Page 2B “Self-Made in America: A Bi- ography of Al- fred Anderson” is a biography, but it’s also a history of entre- peneurship and political life in Litchfield and Meeker County during the early to middle part of the 20th century, according to au- thor Steve Dille. By Andrew Wig STAFF WRITER Recent market conditions have made scrap metal an in- creasingly desira ble target for thieves in Meeke r County and beyond. Enticing them has been near record-high metal prices. In recent weeks , R&R Auto Salvage and R ecycling in Litchfield was p aying $4.15 per pound for the highest grade copper, up from the $1 per pound coppe r was getting in late 2008, alt hough prices have leveled off some in the past two week s, coinciding with recent st ock market volatility. “We’ve been ex periencing metal thefts for t he last couple years, but there seems to be a heightened inter est in steal- ing copper and o ther metals,” Meeker County Sheriff Jeff Norlin said. However, “we ha ve made no arrests yet,” he a dded. Last year his o ffice made one metal-theft arrest, he said. The problem is, the items LITCHFIELD Darwin unwind s during city celebration ◆ 16A Girls ready to make a racket AUGUST 18 , 2011 SINCE 1876 $1 Vintage vehicles Independent ReviewIndependent Review SUBMITTED PHOT OS Mike Shaw, right , says playing a S haw-Allen-Shaw reunion concert i n Litchfield will b e a special mome nt, con- sidering that he and brother Terry , left, grew up he re, and Jim Allen lived in the city f or a long time. A ll three now live elsewhe re — Mike in Hut chinson, Terry in Willmar and Jim i n Florida. Scrap metal thefts on the rise in Meeker County By Brent Schach erer EDITOR Litchfield sewer rates will increase 4.1 perc ent in 2012 to finance reconstr uction of the failed eastside tr unk line, fol- lowing a unanim ous decision Monday by the C ity Council. Council member s approved a bond sale bid an d a construc- tion bid for the s ewer project, which carries a $1.5 million price tag, and f ollowed that with the decisio n to increase rates for all res idential and commercial pro perties. The increase will ap ply to every- one, except the “ reduced rate” available to elder ly residents. The rate increase as it is ap- plied to First Dis trict Associa- tion, the city’s la rgest waste- water customer, also will be mitigated somew hat by a re- turn to FDA of ta x abatement dollars from the dairy cooper- ative that had b een going to the city’s Sewer F und. Trunk sewer reco nstruction became necessar y when a por- tion of the east side line col- lapsed between Econofoods and VFW/Hero’s on Precision Drive. City eng ineers from Bolton & Menk determined that some portio ns of the line, from the collap sed area to Fifth Street, will have to be ex- cavated and repl aced. Most of the trunk, which had not col- lapsed or becom e misshapen, can be lined, whic h is a less ex- pensive option. The suggested ra te increase received unanim ous approval, but only after a brief discus- sion about the eq uity of rates. Ward 2 counci l member Connie Lies aske d if commer- cial properties should be judged all in o ne class, or Council raises sewer rates for 2012 By Brent Schach erer EDITOR Th irty-five years is a long time, especially i n the music business. But the 1970s wi ll seem a little les s distant Saturday night at the Me ek- er County Fairgr ounds, as the Sha w- Allen-Shaw band reunites for a m u- sical walk down m emory lane as pa rt of the Backyard Band, Brew & B BQ fundraiser for th e Litchfield Ope ra House. The band’s nam esakes — Mike Shaw, Jim Allen and Terry Shaw — are viewing the r eunion concert w ith a mixture of trepi dation and antici pa- tion. But while much has changed sinc e the band’s heyda y, when it set ba ll- room attendance records and reco rd- ed two albums, t he musical bond re- mains the same. Just to be sure, the group gathered f or a few pre-conc ert rehearsals durin g the past week. “I’m nervous. It w ill be like my first day of school o r something,” Te rry Shaw said. “Bu t Jim said to m e, ‘We’ve just got to get through t hat first song’ ... that old saying about rid- ing a bike, you k now?” The ride Shaw-A llen-Shaw took a ll those years ago was no pedal-p ow- ered promenade, however. Their r ise was more like a nitro-boosted roc ket ride that brought them regional fa me and a decent inco me. Though band me mbers still seem a bit unsure of ju st how they cau ght Comin’ home to pla y The Shaw-Allen -Shaw band will reunit e for its first concert i n 35 years. The fo rmer Litchfield brothe rs and friend, who reco rded two albums and earned numerous awar ds, will perform Saturd ay at the fairgrounds as part of a fundraiser for the Litchfield Opera House. Funds from incr ease will pay for fixin g failed trunk line on east side of Litch field See SEWER on P age 6A See CONCERT on Page 2A Sheriff’s Office s eeks public’s help in finding thieve s See METAL on P age 7A Jim Allen teamed up with brother s Mike Shaw and Terry Shaw to f orm Shaw-Allen-Shaw , one of the regio n’s most popular bands in the 1970 s. The trio played their first gig on a Frid ay night at the A merican Legion c lub in Litchfield. By Brent Schach erer EDITOR The back cover of “Self-Made in America: A Biogr aphy of Alfred An - derson” offers a glimpse of a r e- markable man: fr om Swedish imm i- grant to founder of Anderson Chem - ical to mayor of L itchfield. But page throug h the book’s 179 pages, and a dee per understandin g develops of Ande rson, one of Litch - field’s early entre preneurs. “Why would any one want to buy this book?” co-au thor Steve Dille of Dassel asks rhet orically. “Well, th e way I look at it, here’s a guy wh o came here as a 1 4-year-old Swedi sh immigrant with n othing, all by him - self, with no fam ily support. Fifty - two years later, he passes away ... and I believe he w as one of the mor e significant citize ns in this county in that half-century .” Dille, a former s tate senator, ad- mitted he might be more than a l it- tle biased. After all, Anderson w as his grandfather. That family link gave him access to information that others mig ht have had a diff icult time findin g. But there was no need to embellis h Anderson’s life h istory when fact s so clearly illustr ate his impact o n the area. It’s a history clos ely tied to Ander- son Chemical Co ., which will cele - brate its 100th a nniversary with an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. Frid ay at company hea dquarters at 32 5 Davis Ave. S., Li tchfield. “I’m pleased thi s book was completed a nd pub- lished in the ce ntennial year of Anderson Chemi- cal Company,” sa id Dille, who wrote the m ajority of the book, us ing let- ters, newspape r clip- pings and other sources meticulously co llected by his mother a nd co- author, Bonnie Ander- son Dille, who d ied in 2006. Anderson Chemi cal celebrates 10 0th anniversary BACK THEN 6B BULLETIN BOARD 5B CLASSIFIEDS 13A COMMUNITY 1B CROSSWORD 6B FAITH 4B KIDS CORNER 6B LOCAL 3A OBITUARIES 6A OPINION 4A PEOPLE 2B PUBLIC NOTICES 10A RURAL LIVING 3B SPORTS 8A WHAT’S INSIDE : HOW TO REACH US E-mail: [email protected] endentreview.net [email protected] ndentreview.netTelephone: (320) 6 93-3266 Fax: (320) 693-917 7 The Meek- er County Sheriff’s Of- fice has seen an increase in thefts of metal, in- cluding cop- per. The Sheriff’s Of- fice asks for the public to notify them if they see unknown people or vehicles, espec ially in the evening, near pla ces where equipment is left outside. Diggin’ Twine Ball Day Antique Car Ru n travels through county ◆ 1B New book honor s Alfred Anderson who f ounded the Litchfield bu siness in 1911; compan y plans open house on F riday See ANDERSON on Page 7A Litchfield tennis team returns seven senior sta rters ◆ 8A
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 10 Dailies under 10,000–6 entries First Place: Faribault Daily News Far and away the best of the bunch! Excellent local features, with photos and page design that really boosts the page. Very well- written. Second Place: The Bemidji Pioneer Easily the best of the rest. Real good range of youth, high school, college and pro sports. Loved the old cartoons with the Dallas Cowboys story. Dailies 10,000 and over–7 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead The investigative reporting and emphasis on local sports events made the Fargo/Moorhead newspaper the clear winner in this category. Going beyond the scores and letting the players in controversial situations speak for themselves was a big plus. Second Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester The Post-Bulletin did itself proud by emphasizing local sports and going beyond the games to find out more about the issues behind the scenes. Weeklies up to 1,500–13 entries First Place: Ely Timberjay Great use of photos overall. This paper is not afraid to dedicate space on the page to photos that are deserving. Well done! Second Place: The Voyageur Press of McGregor Some really nice photos here. The difference between this entry and first place was slim. Honorable Mention: Portage News, Floodwood Dynamic use of photos, including some nice nature shots. Sports Reporting CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Use of Photography as a Whole Do you think the city should’ve been better prepared to respond to the flood, even knowing how rapidly the waters rose? FARIBAULT DailyNews Wrestlers host Dick Shiels Invite/B1 Sunday DECEMBER 5, 2010 www.faribault.com Serving Faribault and Rice County, Minneso ta 75¢ Did you know... What does Santa eat for breakfast? Head over to the Faribault American Legion Post #43 between 8 a.m. and noon Sunday (today), and you can find out. The Cannon Valley de- tachment of the Marine Corps League is hosting breakfast with the big red elf himself. Cost for adults is $7, children $4. The Legion is located at 112 Fifth St. N.E. All proceeds to benefit Toys for Tots. Question of the day Cast your vote at www. faribault.com. Today’s results from the previous poll question can be found on Page A4. Inside Brides & Grooms .......A7 Mind, Body & Spirit ....A8 Classifieds ............. B4-8 Comics .......................B3 Community News ......A6 Obituaries ..................A5 Opinion ......................A4 Regional News ..........A9 Sports .................... B1-2 State News ................A9 Two SecTionS, 18 PageS Vol. 97, no. 282 ©2010 Outside Downright nippy High: 13 Low: -3 Page B8 Lotteries Daily 3.......................1-2-6 Northstar ........ 2-3-8-12-19 Powerball . 13-24-27-31-42 ball ................................22 Contact us Delivery..........333-3111 [email protected] Newsroom.....333-3134 [email protected] Classifieds.....333-3123 [email protected] FAX...............333-3102 Damaris Garcia Grade 2 Lincoln Elementary MAIN PHOTO: The old siphon box, no w in the bottom of the river. The flood waters carved a new channel for the r iver, destroying the collection system for the treatment plant. LEFT INSET: The o ld siphon boxes before the flood. RIGH T INSET: Parts of the destroyed siphon boxes, ripped apart by the force of th e flood. (Courtesy of the City of Faribau lt) River runs through it When a ... ▼ wHat DID we LeaRn?City response to flood: Reactionary “With water rising like that, what else coul d we do?” By Joseph Lindberg [email protected] Sept. 23 - 3:30 p.m. A Reactionary Response Mayor John Jasinski re- members standing beside the raging Straight River Thurs- day, huddled over the hood of his truck with a flashlight, frantically searching through his phone for anyone who owned property near the river- bank. The river was flooding, and it happened at the blink of an eye. “Just by looking at it you knew that river was going to flood,” he said. “And that’s when the adrenaline starts pumping and you start try- ing to do whatever you can to help.” The National Weather Ser- vice issued a flash flood warn- ing for Rice County the night before, but one thing was be- coming abundantly clear to the mayor: The water was rising by the minute, at a rate unlike anything Faribault had ever seen. It was the sheer speed and severity of the flooding that floored city officials — and the public. By 7:20 p.m. on Sept. 23, Mayor Jasinski declared Faribault in a State of Emer- gency, triggering an entire ar- ray of processes for aid. But all eyes were still on the river: At this point, the city was at the Straight River’s mercy. “Never in my life had I seen such incredible power,” Police Chief Dan Collins said. “It’s pretty hard to grasp unless you saw it.” City Engineer Tim Murray had never seen water levels rise so quickly. “The speed was incred- ible,” he said. “The only thing we could do was react.” City officials across the board share that assessment. “If we had to go back and do it all again, not a whole lot would change,” Mayor Jasin- ski said. “We reacted as best we could given the resources ... the simple fact is this flood hit so fast, there was no way to take preventative steps.” More than two months have passed, vital pieces of the sewer system have been completely rebuilt and damage continues to be assessed. But city officials are still aware of the elements in their response that need improvement — for the next time a 500-year flood comes around. Sept. 24 - 1 a.m. Sandbags By Friday morning, it was all hands on deck. “The city staff was incred- ible,” Murray said. “It didn’t matter what your title was or what your job was, we all did what was necessary.” For most that meant one thing: Sandbags. City officials started bag- ging along the western bank of the Straight river, attempt- ing to protect as much as they could from floodwater rising at a furious pace. Workers placed sandbags on both private and public property, a decision made purely in the heat of the moment. “You see so much property at risk,” Jasinski said. “You have to do everything you can, you can’t just sit there and watch without trying to help.” Murray agreed. Here are some of the most important takeaways the city got from its per- formance during last fall’s flood: Location: The need for several, public locations for sandbag opera- tions rather than a single location Sandbags: Lager stockpiles of sandbags and supplies Nixle: Much larger portion of popu- lation signed up on Nixle services Notice: More immediate and pru- dent use of Nixle once large popula- tion is using Nixle Delegate: More clear responsi- bilities: Rather than one person in charge of several operations, tap other experienced employees to handle some of the workload Communication: A more stream- lined communication tree to avoid any confusion on ground level Procedure: Now that flooding disas- ter “zones” have been clearly identi- fied, a more complete street level shutdown procedure See RESPONSE on A3 Residents head for Hometown Holidays By Joseph Lindberg [email protected] The Bachrach building came to life Saturday after-noon, its atrium and loft so carefully and completely covered with holiday decoration and spirit you might have mistaken the day for Dec. 24. Hometown Holidays seems perfect- ly at ease with its new location. Home to the Cheese Cave, the mul- tipurpose building was transformed into a holiday spectacle, complete with Santa, cookie-making stations, lights and ornament creation stations for par- ents and children alike. Turnout was strong for the event — by 1:30 p.m., children lined up out the door to the Bachrach’s loft to sit on Santa’s lap and decorate cookies. “We wanted to get downtown and look at the storefronts and see what was happening,” said Ed Gulland as he watched his 8-year old son David anx- iously await his turn with Santa. “We wanted to be part of the action.” Some children seemed apprehen- sive at the sight of such an impressive Santa, fully adorned with white beard, red plush suit and life-like snow-tipped forest surrounding him. Most of the apprehension evapo- rated when the children were carefully directed toward the bowls of frosting for decorating cookies. Girl Scout Troop #2217 made Hometown Holidays one of their car- oling stops Saturday afternoon, mak- ing sure to infuse the event with a dose of Christmas cheer. They sang several tunes, filling the entire building with their voices. “We came to get pictures [with San- ta] and explore downtown,” said Troop Leader Jennifer David as her second- and third-grade Brownies huddled around Santa. “All the girls were excit- ed about spreading Christmas spirit.” Photos were available through Paul J. Caron Photography, making all the photos easily accessible through its website. See HOLIDAYS on A2[|xbIDFDCy00000ozX Half way there $100 Official newspaper for th e city of Ely VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 JANUARY 15, 2011 imberjayT the Ely Piragis Northwoods Co mpany 105 North C entral Avenue Ely, M innesota 218-365-67 45 www.piragis.com �������������� ���� ������ ���� ��� ������� ��������� Visit the Bookstore at Piragis Northwoods. Great Books with Pers onal Service! WINTER FROLIC SCHOOL BOARD planned New trail Page 9 Smaller referendum scheduled for March action Local sports Page 1B Seasonal mania lets loose at Ely High School midway through the school year The Ely School Board voted 3-2 to approve a resolution calling for another bond referendum to replace the school district’s failing heating system, during its regula r monthly meeting on Monday. This time around they will ask for approximately $3 million to be used exclu - sively for replacing the heating system. Afte r much discussion, the board chose Tuesday , March 8 to hold the special election. Board member Bill Skradski voted in opposition to the motion and questioned the timing of another vote. He said he agreed the district needs a new heating system, bu t he thought the vote was coming too soon after the failure of a similar two-part ref - erendum last November. Board member Paul Pengal also agreed that a new heating system is needed. Bu t he stated he disagreed with the type of system that would be installed. He had hoped more research would have been done on renew - able options for the district and said he didn’ t feel comfortable voting for the hot wate r system the engineering firm Foster, Jacobs and Johnson have been recommending. The remaining three board members felt comfortable with the information and voted “yes.” “We have a serious problem here. We’re already looking at some costly repairs that may be needed this year,” said Board Chair Ray Marsnik. Scott Kellerman agreed, saying the dis- trict needed to get the ball rolling. However , he later added he was a bit worried abou t receiving voter approval on March 8 due to Morse Township elections. Morse would also be asking its voters for approval of a new fire hall the same day. High School Principal Kim Belcastro stated after the vote that it would be impor - tant for the board to be united as it attempts to sell the project to the public. “We’re going on borrowed time,” she said. “The last vote only failed by a couple of hundred votes and I think it was due to the fact that the board wasn’t quite togeth - er with the message they were communi - Ely High School students blew off some seasonal steam at the annual Winter Frolic this week. The event came around a little earlier this year to accommodate the remaining home games in the winter sports schedule. But that didn’t mean the madness wasn’t necessary. After all, there’s still about half a school year left to go. Along with sporting events, the week was filled with activities like “Hershey Hugs and Kisses,” the “Couch Raffle” and the traditional “Wolf Hunt.” A few new wrinkles showed up in the dress-up days with themes like “Back to Summer Day” and “Athlete Day.” Imagine plodding up flights of school steps in full goalie gear. And then there were those pep rally events that don’t quite qualify as sport, but they’re not for wimps, either. Two relay contests featured the likes of shopping carts, cup-stilts and garbage cans on rollers. Throw in some stan- dard scooters, jump ropes, hula hoops, badminton rackets and birdies, and par- Above: Ashley Snyder (lef t) and Breanna Thompson do extreme shopping. Right top: Down periscope . Laying low means less wi nd resistance in relays. Right center: Winter Froli c Queen Chelsea Nelson wears her crown well. Courtmate Lauren Mahon ey offers her congratulatio ns. Right bottom: Erin Muhvic h ungnarls her frozen T-shi rt while the man behind the mask seems to be los ing time looking for the bu ttons. photos by S. Stowell See Schools...page 8 by SCOTT STOWELL Ely-Babbitt Editor See Frolic...page 8 by ADAM MASLOSKI Staff Writer New documents obtained by theTimberjay through the state’s Data Practices Act are raising alarming questions about the veracity of claims by representatives of Johnson Controls, Inc., regarding the district’s school closure and facilities con- solidation plan. That plan calls for the closure of five community schools, the con- struction of two new schools to serve multiple communities, and the ren- ovation of remaining schools. JCI officials told the St. Louis County School Board back in September 2009 that the plan was the only way that it could stave off a financial crisis that would leave the school district with a $4.1 million budget deficit by the 2011-12 school year. Those dire predictions enabled the school district to achieve narrow voter approval in December 2009 of a $78.8 million bond measure to pay for it all. Key among the new documents handed over by JCI is a “master spreadsheet” that the company devel- oped in order to support its claim that its plan would generate more than $5.6 million in cost reductions for the school district. Those cost reductions, JCI claimed, would allow the district to close the projected $4.1 million budget gap and achieve a million dollar-plus surplus dedicat- ed to educational improvements. The spreadsheet, and support- ing documents created by the school district, have been examined in detail by both the Timberjayand by Dennis Peterson, a retired engineer who consulted to private industry on major construction projects for more than 40 years. Peterson currently resides in Greaney. While the spreadsheet is pur- ported to demonstrate more than $5 million in cost savings, it, in fact, strongly suggests that individuals who developed the document con- sistently exaggerated anticipated See Spreadsheet...page 10 by MARSHALL HELMBERGER Managing Editor Documents: JCI numbers don ’t add up ISD 2142 Investigation finds Johnson Controls overstated sav ings from staff reductions in school plan
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 11  Weeklies 1,501-2,500–14 entries First Place: Jordan Independent Crisp photos with a purpose. This was the most well-designed paper in the category and that helped showcase the photos in a nice way. Well done! Second Place: Houston County News, La Crescent Nice photos overall. Honorable Mention: Tracy Headlight-Herald Outstanding sports photography; good use of photos, overall. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–18 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune In a category filled with strong competition, the Tribune stood out for its compelling photos, which dominated section fronts and interior pages. The variety of photos (from dropping off kids at school to crowning a local pageant queen to various sporting events) show the paper’s dedication to complete community coverage. Second Place: Litchfield Independent Review In a time of shrinking budgets and shrinking news hole, the Independent Review places its emphasis on the value of photos. Section fronts are filled with a variety of photos from news to features. The photo spread for Watercade is an outstanding example of community journalism. People like seeing their names and faces in the paper, and in the Review, names and faces abound. Weeklies over 5,000–8 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader Outstanding use of strong, local photos throughout provide many, many entry points for readers. It is clear that the paper’s designers place a high value on using good photography both as stand-alone content and to compliment the stories. The Leader lived up to its name in this contest, clearly rising above the competition. Second Place: Lakeshore Weekly News, Wayzata Entries had compelling photos with most every story, showing the commitment to storytelling through words and photos. ‘Just Hair’ photo, though nothing exceptional in terms of technique or execu- tion, is a great example of the impact even simple photos can have. A good variety of news, feature and sports images mean there’s something for everyone. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  A division of Queen of Peace Hospital 18 22 04 INDEPENDENT JO R D A N Thursday, November 25, 2010 WOLF, WAGNER TAKE LEAD ROLES – 3 © 2010 Southwest Newspapers serving Jor dan / www.jordannews.com / Vol. 127, No. 2 9 $1.00 FOOD SHELVERS Pre-planning funerals, estate planning, grief support, and more. Blessings in a Backpack offers a Thanksgiving dinner, too. A gas line break delays Xcel Energy’s downtown Jordan project. 6 8 INSIDE county news sportsPhoto — page 2 public safety our schools neighbors murder charges ..........3 met council plan ........3 views ...........................4 police report ...............5 daybook ......................9 looking back .............22 A picnic took place, celebrating one year of volunteerism at the Jordan Area Food Shelf. 9 special section One of the trails of which Jordan can be most proud and one that might be the most embarrasing are near the intersection of Hope Avenue and Old Highway 169. Here, a bicyclist crosses Hope Avenue. PHOTO BY DAVID SCHUELLER PROMISE: BICYCLE ROUTES � To read the City of Jordan Mas ter Parks, Trails and Natural R esources Plan, go to jordan.govo ffi ce.com. � To read more about Jordan tra ils, search for “bicycle trails” at jordannews.com. � To see a map of the existing tra ils and proposed trails, as well a s photos from along the bicycle r outes in Jordan, turn to page 2. PHOTO BY MATHIAS BADEN Tim Bischke (left), an advoc ate for better trails in Jorda n and Scott County, lobbies Jordan May or Pete Ewals during a past tour of the city’s facilities for bicyclists. Revising the bike trail plan By Mathias Baden As one adage goes: If gov- ernment wants to eventually get a project done, it’s best to spend money during prosper- ous times but then keep plan- ning during times of lean budgets. Jordan’s vision for bicycle trails is an ambitious one. Years ago, the Jordan Valley Bike Tour coined the phrase “Hub of Scott County” in ref- erence to Jordan’s central geographic location within the county and the bicycle routes running through town. City offi cials have consistent- ly repeated the phrase and done what they felt they could afford to do. Some residents have said the city hasn’t done enough. On Monday, when the Jor- dan Park and Recreation Com- mission held an open house to publicize its 121-page draft City of Jordan Master Parks, Trails and Natural Resource Plan, a partnership between the city of Jordan and 1,000 Friends of Minnesota came to a head. Made possible by the Commu- nity Growth Options (CGO) You can buy your gas at 11 cents a gallon By Mathias Baden Last week, Paul Rader- macher of Jordan and his brother, Steve, fueled their cars at 11 cents a gallon. It’s true – anyone can buy gas for that price, too, if they buy the right items through the Pump Perks program at Rader- macher’s Fresh Market. “Of course, we do all of our shopping at the store,” Paul Ra- dermacher said. Radermacher’s Fuel Ex- press opened Nov. 5 on the northwest corner of the gro- cery store site along Highway 282 in Jordan, offering three grades of gasoline, plus die- sel. The station is pay-at-the- pump only, open 24 hours, and accepts cash. Construction of the six- pump station cost about $500,000, a “signifi cant invest- ment,” Paul Radermacher said. “It’s a very competitive busi- ness. Margins are low.” So it’s all about customer experience and business en- hancements for Radermach- er’s, which has done business in Jordan since 1954, when the late Roman Radermacher bought the Red Owl store in downtown Jordan and began building what has turned out to be an innovative grocery-store dynasty. The business moved toward the highway, and in 2007, it remodeled and expand- ed Radermacher’s Fresh Mar- ket for about $1.2 million. Roman retired in 1973, handing over the business to his son, Lee, whose children eventually became intricately involved with the business. Radermacher’s gas to page 26 Trails to page 2 Find homes here Senior housing market gets competitive By Mathias Baden Jordan city offi cials prom- ised that the most recently proposed senior housing de- velopment isn’t a false alarm. They also seemed adamant that another earlier-proposed senior housing development still is going to happen. Last Monday, Montag De- velopment proposed and the Jordan City Council approved a comprehensive plan amend- ment, preliminary plat, and preliminary planned-unit de- velopment for another senior housing facility. Oak Terrace Senior Hous- ing of Jordan would be a 51- unit memory care, assisted living and independent living facility near Jordan Elemen- tary School. It would require $1 mil- lion of tax-increment fi nanc- ing (TIF) but also provide 40- some jobs and a $1-million-a- year payroll. TIF is a develop- ment tool employed by which the city collects a business’ taxes and then returns a por- tion of the taxes to the busi- ness in exchange for creat- ing housing that is deemed necessary. Montag’s TIF plan comes to the city council for approval Senior housing to page 3 PHOTO BY MATHIAS BADEN Amy Radermacher, Paul Nic holas and Paul Radermacher show off the n ew 24-hour pay-at- the-pump-only gas station in Jordan. Federal money could help students who haven’t met standards By David Schueller The Jordan School Board is poised to decide what to do with about $300,000 of federal money meant to preserve or create jobs. The tougher question, though, is answering what secondary effects the money will have on Jordan Public Schools’ budget. Board members heard a staff recommendation on Nov. 22 to use the money for helping the district get closer to meeting state testing stan- dards by creating three posi- tions to target students who aren’t doing well on the tests. A multicultural and outreach coordinator, a Response to Intervention (RTI) teacher, and an RTI paraprofessional would reach out to students who are struggling in reading and math, or who would ben- efi t from better connection to the district. T h e i r s a l a r i e s c o m - bined would add up to about $180,000, with much of the rest going to teachers who al- ready work in the district. Staying on the state’s list of schools that don’t meet ad- equate yearly progress (AYP) on the Minnesota Compre- hensive Assessment-II tests could cost the district more money because of sanctions. “It will save us money if we can get some good re- sults,” said Superintendent Kirk Nelson. “This is an easy deci- sion to me because then we School money to page 8 VOLUME 104, NO. 13 • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011• DETROIT LAKES, MN NEWSSTAND $1.00 • 3 SECTIONS Forecast High:38 Low:28 SUNDAY Chance of rain or snow Becker County’s #1 News Website www.dl-online.com High:44 Low:27 SATURDAY Mostly sunny High:40 Low:27 FRIDAY Slight chance of rain or snow High:39 Low:28 THURSDAY Chance of rain or snow High:37 Low:29 TODAY Wintery mix tonight FE AT U R E It’s the King, babyThe DLHS drama department presents “All Shook Up” featuring the music of Elvis Presley with performances starting next week. Page 1C IN S ID E Clowning aroundThe José Cole Circus came through DL for a performance Monday night. Page 2A Informing Becker County for over 100 years BY PAULA [email protected] If you have ever picked up ordropped off a child at RooseveltElementary, you have been tothe war zone known as “thenorth side.” Every weekday morningaround 8 a.m. and afternoonaround 3:30 p.m., the battle be-gins as parents attempt to jock-ey into position for a pick-up ordrop off. “It’s nuts, it’s crazy,” said Roo-sevelt Principal Jerry Hanson,adding, “I know when I’ve beenup there I’ve gotten some signlanguage from parents,” helaughs. Hanson says when that areawas built in 1990, it was done sowith 450 students in mind.Now, school enrollment ispushing 700, and that’s not theonly complicating factor.“So many families have twoworking parents now, so thereare a lot more people droppingtheir kids off on the way towork,” Hanson said.Roosevelt parent, Stacy Connsays she doesn’t like how all thecars are put so close togetherwhile they sit waiting.“I don’t want to complain,but I see these kids trying tosqueeze between cars, and I al-ways worry that a parent mightaccidentally let their foot offthe brake or something. It’s socrazy there. It’s ridiculous.”Officials at the school districtcould be swooping in like NATOon a peacekeeping missionthough, as they begin talks of re-doing that whole area.School leaders are set to beginphase two of a three-part plan toalleviate traffic congestion atthe school. This summer, the $175,000plan is to expand the northeastparking lot, which will becomesolely staff parking. Then comes the expensive part. “We plan to revamp the wholearea south of the school (in theback of the building) so thatparents will no longer pick theirkids up on the north side, butwill do so on the south sidewhere the buses are now,” saidthe district’s business manager,Ted Heisserer. Heisserer says the traffic flowwill be divided so that one areais for parents and another areais for buses. “We’ve looked at a lot of dif-ferent designs, and we now pret-ty much have it mapped out howwe want it to be,” said Heisserer.Exactly when this will happenis still up in the air though, asschool officials still need to fig-ure out exactly how much it will cost and how they will pay for it.“It would be nice if it hap-pened summer of ‘12, but real-istically it’ll probably be morelike summer of ‘13,” said Heis-serer. In the meantime, school offi-cials are doing the best they canwith what they’ve got.“We try to put more patrols upthere, and after school we have agentleman trying to help directtraffic a little bit,” Hanson said.That “gentleman” is RonBadurek. A custodian at the school,Badurek was given the job no-body wanted a couple of yearsago. He says most of the parentsare accustomed to how thingsare there, but once in a while he does have to deal with ones thatare a little “irate.” “I just try to keep my cool andexplain the situation to them,”said Badurek. “And if that does-n’t work, I have them talk to theoffice about it.” Stacy Conn says how peopletreat Badurek bothers her evenmore than the traffic conges-tion. “More than a few times I haveseen parents yelling at him, andI feel so bad because it isn’t hisfault.” So, for a while longer,Badurek will have to good-na-turedly take parental abuse andparents will have to endure moretime in the battle zone until theday the black tar is laid and thewhite flag raised. BRIAN BASHAM/TRIBUNE ROOSEVELT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL custodian Ron Badurek has a laugh with parent Cheryl Hutchinson as she waits to pick up her kids after school Tuesday afternoon in the upper Roosevelt parking lot. BRIAN BASHAM/TRIBUNE CUSTODIAN RON BADUREK doubles as traffic director in the Roosevelt Elementary School upper park- ing lot every afternoon as parents come to collect their children. WELL-GROOMED TRAILS Snowmobile club fights county plans BY NATHAN [email protected] A Detroit Lakes snowmobileclub is not happy with a countyproposal to quit grooming snow-mobile trails and turn the re-sponsibility over to area snow-mobile groups. The ULTRA (United Lakesand Trails Riders Association)group has gone so far as to sendout letters to businesses, warningthat the quality of the trails willdiminish and winter touristsmay go elsewhere if the countygets out of the snowmobilegrooming business.“Becker County has managedthe trail system for over 30years,” the letter reads. “Duringthat time ULTRA SnowmobileClub has supported the countywith volunteers and monetarydonations for equipment. Be-cause of the economic impact ofsnowmobiling on local business,we felt you would want to bemade aware of the pendingchange in the county’s position.”For their part, county offi-cials say there’s no reason localsnowmobile clubs can’t handletrail grooming and maintenance,since that’s how it’s done justabout everywhere else in Min-nesota. “I think the clubs can do a bet- JOURNALIST AND AUTHORRoxana Saberi spent more than 3months in an Iranian prison ontrumped-up charges. TRAILS to page 10A ➤ ROXANA SABERI IN DL A taste of the terror that governs Iran BY VICKI [email protected] One day in January 2009, Rox-ana Saberi was finishing up in-terviews for the book she wasworking on, packing and gettingready to leave her father’s nativecountry of Iran, where she hadmade her home since 2003.The next day, her life had tak-en a drastic, dramatic turn: Fourmembers of the Iranian militarypolice showed up at her frontdoor, ready to place her under ar-rest for espionage. “I was terrified,” Saberi said —not only did she have no way ofcontacting her family back inFargo, but she wasn’t sure anyonehad seen her being taken fromher home, so there was a possi-bility that no one would knowwhat had become of her.Over the next 100 days of hercaptivity at Tehran’s Evin Prison— notorious for incidents of hor-rific violence and torture — Saberi SABERI to page 10A BY PIPPI [email protected] About 70 members of dockand lift companies, resort own-ers, lake associations and othersinterested in controlling aquaticinvasive species gathered Tues-day morning for training — cour-tesy of the Minnesota Depart-ment of Natural Resources.Darrin Hoverson, DNR inva-sive species specialist out of theItasca office, spoke to the groupabout aquatic invasive species inarea lakes, which ones are inMinnesota, and what needs to bedone to prevent — or at least slow — their spread.“The last thing you want is tobe known as is the guy who in-troduced zebra mussel to a lake,”he said. There are many things thatcan be listed as non-nativespecies, even pheasants for ex-ample, but they aren’t consideredinvasive. It’s when the speciesstart taking a toll on the ecology,degrading water quality andcausing other problems, thatthey are considered an invasive.Millions of dollars are spenteach year fighting invasive DNR TRAINS LAKE PEOPLE TO SPOT THEMHoming in on invasives INVASIVES to page 10A ➤ The 11th annual VergasMaple Syrup Fest will be heldthis Saturday, April 2 from 8a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Vergas Com-munity Center. Feast on some fresh, fluffyhot pancakes topped with puremaple syrup — courtesy of localsyrup producers — along withsausage, juice and coffee. Tick-et prices are $8 for adults and $4for children 12 and under.Enjoy entertainment fromthe DL Cloggers while savor-ing the delicious meal. Therewill also be many maple syrup-themed activities throughoutthe day. Sugarhouse tours will beavailable for those curious abouthow maple syrup is made. Graba map at the Vergas Communi-ty Center to visit one of thesugar shacks where demon-strations of maple syrup pro-duction will be given, weatherpermitting. The sap won’t be the onlything running during Satur-day’s festival, however. The 5KMaple Syrup Run/Walk startsand ends at Billy’s Corner Barin Vergas. Registration will be at8 a.m. with the race starting at STICKY CELEBRATION STARTS SATURDAYMaple syrup in Vergas MAPLE to page 10A➤ A D S ➤Norby’s - ClearanceSale: page 8A ➤Nereson: page 11A ➤ Vergas Maple Syrup:page 6B ➤Washington SquareMall - AeromodelersShow: page 2C ➤NEW! County LineAvailable Online SCHOOL HOPES TO MAKE DROP-OFF, PICK UP A LOT EASIERInto the Roosevelt war zone
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 12 Dailies under 10,000–8 entries First Place: Faribault Daily News News staff obviously works well together to make the most of photos to help tell stories of the day. Good job. Second Place: The Journal, New Ulm Photographers work to capture the moment and do it well. Dailies 10,000 and over–7 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead A picture is worth a thousand words, and The Forum uses their photographs to their fullest potential. Second Place: Duluth News Tribune Well placed, well played, great reproduction, combine with creativity to ensure quality throughout. Weeklies up to 1,500–6 entries First Place: Kenyon Leader The Kenyon Leader consistently made good use of subheads. There is also a nice difference in the size of the headlines compared with the subheads and the copy text. Many of the headlines made a powerful impact. Second Place: Le Center Leader The Le Center Leader had great use of verbs in its headlines, particularly in the sports stories. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–11 entries First Place: Tracy Headlight-Herald Rather than one or two blow-me-away headlines, Tracy Headlight Herald staff proves that consistency is a key element to a quality newspaper. Second Place: Pelican Rapids Press A standout in a competitive category. Use of Photography as a Whole CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Headline Writing By Joseph Lindberg [email protected] A pair of robust storm systems doused Faribault with heavy rains Friday, causing a flash flood that temporarily impeded emergency response to a medi- cal call in southern Faribault. Paramedics, police and fire- fighters converged on 17th Street Southwest around 4:50 p.m. Fri- day afternoon responding to a call for medical assistance on Patricks Bay. When emergency teams ap- proached the area, they found the path blocked by water nearly two feet deep at the intersec- tion of Prairie Avenue and 17th Street Southwest — with a mini- van already stalled in the inter- section. So emergency response teams resorted to their feet, sprinting to the scene and treating a youth that likely tripped and fell into the water. The victim was con- scious and alert, and was trans- ported to the hospital, said John Rowan, deputy director of Rice County emergency services. Rowan was on patrol, moni- toring the flash flooding caused by nearly nonstop rain Friday morning and afternoon. He was one of the first to respond to the scene. “That has to be the only time I can remember having response impacted by flash flooding,” he said. Should Gov. Dayton and the GOP delay $700 million in payments to school districts to help solve the budget deficit? FARIBAULT DailyNews U17s approach finish line/B1 [|xbIDFDCy00001lz[ SATURDAy JULY 16, 2011 www.faribault.com Serving Faribault and Rice County, Minneso ta 75¢ Did you know... A fundraiser for the Faribault firefighters will be held from 6 to 11 a.m. July 23 at the Faribault Hy-Vee. There will be an all- you-care-to-eat break- fast buffet for $6.99. Proceeds will go to the Faribault Fire Depart- ment. A clown will be at Hy-Vee for the event, and the firefighters will also be present to show their apprecia- tion. Question of the day Cast your vote at www. faribault.com. Today’s results from the previous poll question can be found on Page A4. Inside Education...................A7 Classifieds ............. B4-8 Comics .......................B3 Community News ......A6 National News ...........A8 Obituaries ..................A5 Opinion ......................A4 Sports .................... B1-2 State News ................A3 TWO SECTIONS, 16 PAGES VOL. 98, NO. 165 ©2011 Outside Chance of storms High: 88 Low: 74 Page B8 Lotteries Daily 3.......................4-6-9 Northstar.... 6-14-16-17-26 Gopher 5........ 1-2-8-21-27 Contact us Delivery..........333-3111 [email protected] Newsroom.....333-3134 [email protected] Classifieds.....333-3123 [email protected] FAX...............333-3102 Eric Martinez 2nd Grade Jefferson Elementary Find us on the Web and on Facebook faribault.com faribault.com faribault.com A Faribault resident attempts to unplug a s torm drain near the intersection of Prairie A venue and 10th Street Southwest Friday afternoon. Vehicles wer e stalling in the water and trapped along r oads and in the middle of intersections in multiple locations acros s Faribault. (Joseph Lindberg/Daily News) THE ROADS RUNNETH OVER Torrential rains overwhelmed storm drains Friday afternoon, causing flash flooding By Joseph Lindberg [email protected] In the aftermath of the state budget deal between Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican legislative leaders, there seems to be only one thing most Minnesotans can agree on: The budget impasse may be dealt with for now, but the deal does a whole lot of nothing for tomorrow. Core to the budget deal is the delay of $700 million in payments to school districts and $700 million in borrowing against the state’s future tobacco settlement payments. It bridges the $1.4 billion chasm between DFL Gov. Dayton and GOP leadership — but at a serious cost. “It gets a little bit frustrating,” said Faribault School District Superintendent Todd Sesker. “You are fixing the budget on the backs of students again.” He said the immediate impact will be hard to gauge until details of the deal are worked out and the final budget is actually passed. But in the short term, the district is in a good position, he said. “We are in a pretty good financial position,” he said. “But the real concern here is long-term. They borrowed against us in the last two bienniums, so you have to wonder what is going to happen in future budgets.” On the negotiation table is a $50 per- pupil increase to districts, an element that will help districts cover additional borrowing costs. Sesker said it would help, but the lack of a structural fix to the budget is still concerning. Colleen Mertesdorf, director of finance and operations for Faribault schools, has been involved in the budgetary side of education for 24 years. After hearing the news of the budget deal, she was both excited and a bit discouraged. For weeks now, the district has been unable to lean on Department of Education resources. With a budget deal in sight, those resources will soon be made available to the district. But on the flip side, it’s another delay of payments. “Indications are we will get less state aid,” she said. “We’re going to deal with it as best we can.” Mertesdorf said the $50 per-pupil increase is encouraging because it is a permanent increase that the district can count on. She said she’s never seen the state hedge against education funding this much in the past — but when it has dropped, it has always made a fairly strong recovery. “It all depends on the economy,” she said. “You hope something like this is cyclical, that it will bounce back.” School districts around the state are anticipating a sharp rise in borrowing due to consecutive years of deferred payments from the state. With 40 percent of payments to schools now deferred, at least $2 billion in state aid payments are being held, according to state budget officials. That represents nearly half of the state’s $5 billion budget deficit. — Joseph Lindberg covers the city and county for the Daily News. He may be reached at 333-3135. Schools get payments postponed again By Samantha Bushey [email protected] Years after serving in the military, singer Rockie Lynne tours the country and the world to pay tribute to United States veterans and troops abroad. Tuesday night, Lynne will perform songs from his “Songs for Soldiers” album at the Rice County Fair. “We’re excited to come to Faribault,” Lynne said. “It’s go- ing to be great and it’s going to be fun and it’s going to be something the family will en- joy. Everybody should come.” Lynne will return to Minne- sota in September for “Tribute to the Troops,” a motorcycle ride that he co-founded with Gregg Schmitt. During the ride, motorcy- clists will drive to the homes of Minnesota families who lost a loved one in the War on Terror. The first year of the ride Lynne said there were 28 motorcy- clists who visited the families. Now that number is in the hun- dreds. The idea for the ride came after Lynne said news stations made the troop deaths seem like an afterthought. Lynne said they really want- ed to do something for the fami- lies, to let them know their loved ones are not an afterthought. Rockie Lynne, a United States veteran, will per form songs from his album “Songs for Soldiers” Tuesday night at the Rice Coun ty Fair. He travels across the country and overseas to perform for and thank veteran s. (Photo courtesy of Rockie Lynne) Country singer to pay tribute to veterans Ominous clouds filled the sky overloo king the Viaduct into southeast- ern Faribault Friday morning. Torrential ra in pounded Faribault in the early morning hours, followed by a storm system that knocked out power to 1,800 people south of Division St reet West, according to Xcel Energy officials. Storms continued to hit the area throughout the after- noon. (Joseph Lindberg/Daily News) HERE cOmES THE HEAT: The National Weather Ser- vice is predicting a wave of blistering heat for Faribault over the weekend. Saturday temperatures are expected to hit 92 degrees, and Sun- day is expected to be even warmer, with temperatures reaching 97 degrees. See LYNNE on A2 See WATER on A2
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 13  Weeklies 2,501-5,000–12 entries First Place: Chaska Herald This paper clearly stands out above others, with an effort to write headlines that draw readers into the story using live, active, visual words; raising questions; or using words that have just the right touch for features. That’s true not just for the section fronts, but throughout. The end product is an enjoyable read. Nice job. Second Place: Litchfield Independent Review This paper does a very nice job throughout with headlines that guide and inform the reader, from the front pages to the briefs. Solid job that produces an overall effective read. Weeklies over 5,000–8 entries First Place: Echo Press, Alexandria Good use of strong verbs; the headlines were clear and often clever. Second Place: Hutchinson Leader Active headlines; I wanted to read the stories. All Dailies–12 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead In a time when headline writers have little time to massage words, The Forum desk clearly is thinking fast on their feet. Consistently throughout the newspaper, regardless of section, the headlines are thoughtful, with strong verbs when possible. Some highlights: River hunting trek turns tragic; Communities button up, watch, wait; Roving Grovers; Stylish and Sturdy; Bringing Home the Bacon; crafty crullers. Second Place: Duluth News Tribune Duluth’s headline writers clearly understand the value of strong heads. Duluth had the single best head overall (Oh, deer) and others that were thoughtful (Mandarin; electric car campaign shifts into overdrive; Deal struck at brink . . . ; Start your imaginary engines). City considers letting bars stay open until 2 a.m.; it also learns that Zorbaz will take over Bug-A-Boo Bay By Al Edenloff [email protected] You may soon be ableto drink a little laterat Alexandria bars. And one of those pla ces may be a Zorbaz that w ill be taking over Bug-A-Boo B ay. At its Tuesday meeting , the Alexandria City Counc il gave preliminary approval to an or- dinance that would exten d the 1 a.m. bar closing time to 2 a.m. The owners of Bug-A-Bo o Bay and Garden Center (Fat D addy’s) requested the change. The later closing was ap proved on a 3-1 vote with Cind y Bigger, Dave Benson and Owe n Miller voting yes, Sara Carlson voting no and Elroy Frank abstain ing. The ordinance must still go t hrough a public hearing and a fin al read- ing at the next meeting b efore it could take effect. The council also reque sted city staff to find out h ow the later closing time has wo rked in other cities and whether there are problems such as dru nk driving and the added ex - pense of extra law en- forcement patrols. If approved, the ordi- nance would give any of Alexandria’s existing 12 beer, wine, set-ups and liquor license holders, i ncluding clubs like the Eagles and VFW , the option of applying for a state lic ense to extend their closing time to 2 a.m . The extra hours could be a difference- maker for Bug-A-Boo Ba y, according to owner Randy Stodola. He told the council that t he restaurant has been struggling fina ncially and that a new potential buyer, Tom Hanson, founder of the Zorbaz c hain of restau- rants, could take over th e management of Bug-A-Boo immediate ly if the 2 a.m. time was approved. Stodola said that with out the later time, he’d have no choice but to close the restaurant until Hanson planned to buy it in January, which cou ld mean the im- mediate loss of 60 jobs. A bout 20 of those workers attended the council meet- ing as a show of support for the change. “It [a 2 a.m. closing time] is an important tool for us to make it in these tough times,” Stodola told the council. “Without it, I’ll have to close Bug- A-Boo and all the people back there will be looking for jobs.” Charlie Meyer, owner of Garden Center, told the council that the bar business is very competitive. He noted that customer s start leaving Alexandria bars at 12:30 a.m. to hit bars in Osakis and West Un ion, which al- ready have 2 a.m. closing times. “We’ve turned into a 24- hour society,” Meyer said. “This will en hance our busi- ness and help us stay com petitive.” Meyer added that the later closing could also help bring in conventions to the area. www.echopress.com $1.00 FRIDAY I OCTOBER 15 I 2010 INSIGHTS into other cultures N ews A11 NEWLY formed theater brings ba ck old radio productions Vari ety A13 By Al Edenloff [email protected] Leaders from at least 15 churches in Alexan- dria are encouraging residents to attend a “Walk for Life” this Sunday. Their goal: To get people more aware and active in not only stop- ping abortion but also making sure the health needs of the elderly and disabled are being met. They’re hoping to draw a crowd of 1,000 or more. It’s been five years since a Walk for Life has taken place in Alexandria. The event was previously held in January to coincide with the Supreme Court decision, Roe versus Wade, which le- galized abortion. But now with the po- litical season in full gear, organizers hope the walk will lead to ac- tion at the polls. They came up with a catch phrase: “Walk for life, vote with God.” Four of the leaders stopped at the Echo Press Tuesday to talk about the walk – Pastor Darryl Knappen, Nevin Smith, Gerry Hoelscher and Pastor Mike Bartolomeo. They said they want to wake people up to the fact that 50 million babies have been aborted since the 1973 Supreme Court deci- sion. Goal of event: Walk for life, vote with God BARS A11 Zorbaz is known for its pizz a WALK A9 Event starts at 1 p.m. By Celeste Beam [email protected] Standing before Kiwanis members during the ir noon meeting Monda y, Harvey Tewes assur ed them they had nothing to worry about. “I’m not running for commissioner and I a m not Paul [Anderson], b ut he approves this message ,” Tewes joked. Tewes was at the meet- ing on behalf of Anderso n, who was supposed to tak e part in the “Meet the Do u- glas County Commi s- sioner Candidates” forum . Anderson was injured in a fall at his home Octob er 3 and was taken to He n- nepin County Medic al Center. Tewes spoke wi th Anderson this past Sund ay and was told that he’s e x- pected to return to Alexa n- dria this week. Five other commissioner candidates were at th e meeting to answer que s- tions from moderator, Ech o Press Editor Al Edenloff. Will sunfish eat zebras? FORUM A12 They discuss having night meetings Business . . . . . . . .A17 Classifieds . . . . . . . .B6 Variety . . . . . . . . . .A13 For the Record . . . . .A2 Obituaries . . . . . . . .A6 Opinion . . . . . . . . . .A4 Sports . . . . . . . . . . .B1 The official newspape r of Douglas County • Alexandria, MN 320 .763.3133 • News t ips 320.760.0777ECHOPRESS.com a later LAST CALL? ECHOPRESS Alexandria MAKING THE CASE FOR 2 A.M. BAR CLOSIN G Randy Stodola, the owner of Bug -A-Boo Bay, listed a variety of re asons why bars should be allow ed to stay open until 2 a.m.: • Numerous workers in the area are coming off late shifts, includ ing those from 3M, Henry’s Food s, Brenton Engineering, Alexandr ia Extrusion, Doege Precision Mach ining, ITW Heartland, Central Spe cialties, Tastefully Simple and Do nnelly Custom Manufacturing. These workers, Stodola said, rep resent a good portion of the loca l workforce and should be accom modated with a later bar closing. • The Greater Minneapolis Conve ntion and Visitors Association has been approached by several grou ps and organizations that said the y wouldn’t bring their meetings an d conventions into Minnesota un less it allowed a 2 a.m. bar closin g. • The 1 a.m. closing causes peop le to quickly down their last drink and then leave in swarms, Stodo la said. In towns that have adopte d the 2 a.m. closing, the crowds te nd to dissipate over the last hou r at a more leisurely pace, often ordering food with their last drin k. • 48 states currently allow for a 2 a.m. closing or even later, Stod ola said. • Alexandria is in competition w ith many communities for tourism dollars, Stodola said. To remain competitive, it must cater to a so ci- ety that is eating later and vacat ioning where all options are ava ilable. 12 The number of establishments in Alexandria that have some type of alcohol license – on-sale liquor, on-sale beer/wine, club licenses and set-ups. “[A 2 a.m. closing time] is an important tool for us to make it in these tough times. Without it, I’ll have to close Bug-A-Boo and all the peo- ple back there will be looking for jobs.” Randy Stodola BUG-A-BOO BAY OWNER By Celeste Beam [email protected] Could there be a possible solution for the pesky zebra mussel i nfestation? A study of the aqua tic invasive species in Lake Champla in in the state of Vermont points to the possibility. The study, titled, “Will fish become significant predators of zebra mussels in Lake Champlain?” exa mines the use of predatory fish, such a s sheepshead, pumpkinseed sunfish, ye llow perch and rock bass, to decrease t he number of zebra mussels in a lake. Reportedly, these types of fish have learned to recognize zeb ra mussels as food. As part of the two-year study, which was conducted by studen ts at the School of Natural Resources at the University of Vermont, it was disc overed that 50 percent of the pumpkins eeds and about 40 percent of the sheeps head collected had zebra mussels in the ir guts, which suggested that these fi sh commonly consume zebra mussels a s prey. However, one factor dete rmined dur- ing the study is that be cause the con- centration of calcium in the water of Lake Champlain is very low, the zebra mussels have very thin s hells. The thin shells make the zebra mussels more vulnerable to predation. According to Dean Beck , supervisor of the DNR’s Glenwood A rea Fisheries, there are no current stud ies document- ing mussel predation loc ally. Although Beck said he ha s hopes for the pumpkinseed sunf ish, he be- lieves there aren’t enoug h drum – bottom dwelling fish – i n the Alexandria chain of lak es to make a dent in the zebra mussel popula- tion. In contrast to lakes in the northeast, like Lake Cham- plain, lakes around here are clas- sified as hardwater lake s due to relatively eleva ted concentrations of calciu m Kakac Frank Dropik Anderson Salto Olson New study may show a zebra mussel breakthrough FISH A9 Mussels found in Gull Lake Commissioner candidates answer questions
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 14 Weeklies up to 1,500–9 entries First Place: The Voyageur Press of McGregor Excellent in all areas: print quality, cleanliness of ads in all areas, variety of ads. The paper has a good mix of ads that seem to cover virtually every facet of life in McGregor. The ads are clean and well designed, have good use of white space and typography, eye- catching art elements, not too busy, excellent use of color but not overdone. One of the few papers submitted that didn’t feel the need to shade everything! Second Place: Kenyon Leader A very clean paper in terms of the printing and design of the ads. The staff has a nice variety of ROP ads, a beefy Business and Service directory and easy to read classified liners. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–9 entries First Place: Pelican Rapids Press Of all the submissions, this one stood out above the rest. The ads were crisp and clean, well designed and well placed. But it was the classified section that really brought it home. Very well put together, easy to read and navigate. Also to note: Their use of color was great - not overdone and the ads in color weren’t overshadowed by other color elements on the page. Second Place: Hinckley News Good use of color throughout. Classified section was A+. Ads are well designed. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–11 entries First Place: Northfield News Strategic positioning of mid and small ads allows each page to flow smoothly, providing a warm reader experience. 2010 Homecoming special section, presented by various local advertisers, was well designed and visually appealing. Section front page full color ad positions deliver maximum impact! Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune Terrific mix of local and regional advertisers across a wide variety of business categories. Solid use of full page right-hand read positioning for maximum impact. Special occasion & holiday full color advertising directories a nice plus! Effective use of spot color in classified section ads really commands the reader’s attention. Advertising Excellence Volume 117 No. 27 Otter Tail County Single Copy $1 PELICAN RAPIDS, MINNESOTA TH E RESSP July 6, 2011 THANK YOUFORCHOOSINGTHEPELICAN RAPIDS PRESS Obituaries • Edward Lammers 81,Barnesville • Jolyn Priem 52, Vergas • Charles Chapman 87,Dent To see all the photosthat were taken in thepast three months visit our web site www.pelicanrapidspress.com Watch for all thePelican Fest Photos next week Public Notices in this issue • Notice of Foreclosure • Pelican TownshipNotice • Lida Township Notice • Scambler TownshipNotice • City of Pelican RapidsCouncil Minutes • Dunn Township Notice • Norwegian GroveTownship Notice Mercantile continued on page 5 The mid-summer festival inPelican Rapids is a long tradi-tion–with a new name and anincreasingly wide array of events. “Pelican Fest” is July 8-9, andwill feature a packed schedule ofactivities including two streetdances, concessions, a classic carshow and the centerpiece parade at11 a.m. on Saturday plus manyother events.For decades named “TurkeyDays” to recognize the impor-tance of the turkey industry to thelocal economy, the Chamber ofCommerce has retitled the event“Pelican Fest” to broaden itsscope. Turkey remains an importantpart of the event–and the econo-my, as the West Central Turkeyprocessing plant continues to bethe city’s top employer. Turkeyproduction in outlying farms con-tinues to be a crucial agri-busi-ness in the Pelican Rapids areaand Otter Tail County. The Pelican Rapids RotaryClub will host its popular TurkeyBarbeque, from 11 a.m. to 2p.m., Saturday, July 9, in recog-nition of area turkey growers andthe turkey processingindustry–which dates back morethan a half-century in Pelican. After a successful first year in New name forJuly 8-9 celebration FROM Turkey Days TO PPeelliiccaannFFeesstt The 11 a.m. parade, picturedabove at the 2010 event, is one ofmany highlights of the July 8-9“Pelican Fest.” The traditional turkey barbequecontinues as a tradition forPelican Fest–formerly “TurkeyDays.” Members of the PelicanRapids Area Rotary Club preparegrilled turkey for the Saturdayfeast. Pelican Fest continued on page 5 PHILIP DYKHOFF decided he had enough of batting practice during T-Ball practice last Wednesday and found the pitching mound a perfect place to take a break. Philip is the son of Brian and Nancy Dykhoff of rural Erhard. TAKING A BREAK ON THE MOUND The newest specialty retail shop inPelican Rapids opened mid-June, andoperators expect to be in full swingwith an official grand opening duringPelican Fest July 8-9.“Mercantile on Main” is a uniqueventure, operated in a cooperative fash-ion by more than 21 local artisans,crafters, antique vendors and retailers. The shop is located in the formerPark Region Cenex complex, justsouth of the new city liquor store. Inventory at “Mercantile on Main”is, literally, “soup to art” with special-ty and ethnic food products. Crafts andart pieces by a number of artisans aredisplayed throughout–including rugs, artprints, jewelry, yarns, sewing products,photography, antiques, collectibles, Mercantile on Main Specialty retail shop is a cooperativeof many Pelican area vendors, artisans MERCANTILE ON MAIN Pictured here with the “Mercantile onMain” signage are Judy Tabbut andKathy Bergren, who are president andvice president of the Mercantile board.Glenace Metcalfe is secretary and JulieMeyer is the treasurer. By Louis Hoglund Mill Street could also be known as“Ministry Street,” with the plannedaddition of “The Welcome Place” nextdoor to the “Pass It On” thrift store. “The Welcome Place” is a multi-church project, under the umbrella ofTrinity Lutheran, and is intended toserve as a “hospitable space to gather,to build relationships through crosscultural interaction, and to provide for unmet needs in the community.”The building for the proposed centerwould be part of a row of ministry-related storefronts. The thrift store.,which opened seven years ago, is adja-cent to the “Welcome Place” proposal,at 26 Mill Street. On the other side is the Pelican AreaFood Shelf and the Lutheran SocialServices Immigrant Refugee Resettle-ment Office. On the other end of theblock is the Dawo Halal Somali Mar- ket, which also has a Islamic Mosque-Prayer Room. “This isn’t necessarily a new idea,”said Rev. Laurie Skow-Anderson, ofTrinity Lutheran. “We’ve talked aboutan outreach center...but we never had aplace to do it.”When they learned that a buildingwas vacated at a strategic location,brainstorming sessions were held, andfrom those meetings a founding board ‘Welcome Place’ Gathering spot would be new ministry in Pelican SHUT DOWNSHUT DOWN Friday Morning Maplewood State Park had barricades blocking the entrance to the park. Because of the State government shut- down Park Manager Don DelGreco was forced to put up barri- cades. Welcome Place continued on page 5 .04” 2.15” PELICAN RAPIDS WEATHER REPORT Date Snowfall Snow Cover Precip 6/25/11 6/26/11 .05” 6/27/11 .61” 6/28/11 .22” 6/29/11 6/30/11 7/1/11 Date Snowfall Snow Cover Precip 6/2510 .22” 6/26/10 6/27/10 6/28/10 .44” Trace 6/29/10 6/30/10 7/1/10 7/2/10 2010 7/3/10 7/4/10 7/5/10 7/6/10 7/7/10 .16” Trace7/8/10 Prairie Days at Rothsay this weekend Prairie Days is set forFriday - Sunday, July 8-10. Many events areplanned including a vari-ety show & dinner,Shatter the Silence walk,parade, dances and manymore events throughoutthe weekend. See ad onpage 9 for a full listingof events. The community ofRothsay celebrated its125th Anniversary July,2008. The event was such a great success thatthe members of theRothsay Area Community Fund spear-headed the efforts alongwith other communitymembers to continue anannual celebration that isnow called “RothsayPrairie Days”. The goalof the Prairie Days is tooffer a fun weekend com-munity celebration forall ages. Many unique items are availableat the Mercantile on Main. Newsstand $1.25 www.northfieldn ews.com Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 8 Northfield His torical Society gr ows, 8B 8 Pla ns for Wabasha h istoric hotel, 3A Guggisberg resig ns, 1B Northfield News [|xbIIGDJy00000lz[ Main Line: 507-6 45-5615 Newsroom: 507-6 45-1113 Sports: 507-645-1 111 8 Contact Us 8 Coming Up An adult club cam e to Owatonna. It set up business just off th e interstate. Two N orth- field council mem bers disagree on w here such businesses sh ould be located. 8 Deaths, 5A Find us on Facebook and become a fan . 8 Now on Facebo ok Northfield music ian joins new ban d, 9A Carl Leidner, 75 Shane Meehan, 3 8 Shea Stremcha, 25Take a video tour of the new-and-improve d Scriver Build- ing, the home of t he Northfield Historical Society. N On t he Web A1A1 507-645-4478 1201 South Hwy. 3, Northfield “Northfield’s only locally owned new car dealers hip.” See Our Ent ire Inventory of New & Pre-Owne d at Dokmo.comAlways Not ONE PRICE PriceYour open & clos edTIMING RESTAU RANTS IN NORTHFIE LD 2004 1947 July 2010 2005 2004 Sept. 2010 2009 Jan. 2008 Feb. 2010 2008 Mar. 2011 2005 July 2011 Erbert & Gerbert’s S ubs and Clubs Tiny’s Hot Dogs Tea Creations Froggy Bottoms Riv er Pub Wendy’s Pan Pan Internation al Café Butler’s Steak and A le Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Kentucky Fried Chic ken Ole Café 620 Grill Bittersweet Eatery Bittersweet Eatery March 2010 July 2010 in operation Sept. 2010 2010 in operation Nov. 2010 Jan. 2011 Jan., 2011 Feb., 2011 in operation June, 2011 in operation Northfield News Graphic by Joni Berg Why do Northfield ’s restaurants FAIL ? Five reasons we c an’t keep them in bus iness WHY CAN’T WE GET A CHIPOTLE? REQUIREMENTS AND GENERAL LOCATION N EEDS • Urban and suburban with strong residentia l and daytime population. • Preferred generators include residential, offi ce, retail, university, recreation a nd hospitals PREFERRED SITE CRIT ERIA • Urban storefronts, sh opping center end-cap s and pads, freestanding buildings • Current sizes range fr om 1,000 to 2,800 squ are feet depending on trade ar ea characteristics • 25 feet minimum fro ntage • Patio seating preferre d • Zoning to accommod ate restaurant use and allow liquor license (b eer & margaritas) • Parking adequate for restaurant use • Building exterior to a llow Chipotle standard storefront design and signage • Excellent visibility an d access BACK IN BUSINESS? The National Restauran t Association forecasts a positive gro wth for the nation in 2011, after three yea rs of negative sales growth. According to it s 2011 Restaurant Industry Forecast, our r egion is expected to see a 3.1 percent growt h in sales this year. In food services and dri nking places, Rice County employed, on a verage: 1781 in 2006 1967 in 2007 1332 in 2008 1585 in 2009 Progress Northfield News 2011 A rollercoaster year in Northfield Saturday-Sunday, July 23-2 4, 2011 Portraits Northfield News 2011 Saturday-Sunday, July 23-2 4, 2011 2131 in 2010* *Fourth quarter data n ot yet available, average of Q1 through Q3 — Source: U.S. Censu s Bureau, Quarterly Wo rkforce Indicator — Source: Chipotle.co m INSERTED IN TH IS ISSUE By JACQUELIN E A. PAVEK [email protected] ldnews.com We’ ve all had the s ame conversation. “What restaur ant used to be there? ” If you’ve been in Northfield long, it isn’t easy to recall all of the past and pres ent restaurants in town. There has been a lot of movement in that sector in recent years. Behind each of those businesses are p eople who were willing to invest a lot of time, energy and of c ourse, money, into their dream . Owners must juggle resources to keep each part of the bus iness running smoothly, but co nsumers have to support them, too. Why can’t we — customers and entrepreneu rs — keep them in business long- term? Business lessons Jennifer Torgr imson of Northfield had always been smart about her finances. She invested carefu lly and did her homework, but she knows now that frugali ty isn't always enough. See RESTAURAN TS, 6A Shutdown over: Ne w budget cuts fund ing to schools, citie s By SUZANNE R OOK, [email protected] rth- fieldnews.com an d TIM PUGMIRE , MINNESOTa PU BlIc RadIO NE WS Gov. Mark dayt on signed a ser ies of budget bills Wed nesday, ending a nearly three-week state government shu tdown. Though Republi cans passed the bud- get during a o ne-day special session, neither side has fully embraced the final product, which relies on borrow ing and accounting mea sures. But both sides say they're glad the shutdown is ove r. dayton, who des cribed the bills a s the best option avai lable, wanted an income tax increase on top earners, but Repub- licans refused. T hey eventually r esolved the stalemate a nd resulting sh utdown with a combinat ion of tobacco b ond bor- rowing and addi tional delayed st ate pay- ments to school districts. If the voters a re angry about that, dayton said the blame falls squ arely on the GOP. "I think the p eople of Minn esota should know th at their preferen ce is to borrow another $1.4 billion rat her than raise taxes on millionaires an d multi- millionaires,” d ayton said. “The y'll have to explain to th e people of Mi nnesota why that is a bet ter priority. I don 't agree. I would not have voted for the ta x bill if I were a legislator . But I signed it because otherwise Minn esota would not go back to work." Two of the area ’s Republican le gisla- tors, Rep. Kelby Woodard and Sen. al deKruif, see thi ngs differently. “I held my nose and voted for s ome- thing I don’t beli eve in,” deKruif said, ex- plaining his desi re to get Minnes ota back up and running. “This was the b est deal the gov ernor would agree to,” said Woodard. The deal shifts 4 0 percent of stat e aid payments to scho ols to the followi ng year. Even with the pl anned repaymen t of a 30 percent shift fr om 2010-11, No rthfield Superintendent chris Richards on says the district will receive $2.4 mil lion less than it was pro mised in 2011-1 2. Rich- ardson says sc hool officials w ill soon determine whet her it needs to b orrow to pay its bills. and that borrowing, he said, will cost the dis trict money in t he form of interest. charter schools will catch a bre ak as the education b ill assures they’ ll be re- paid faster than non-charters. The upside, said Richardson, is that the education b ill signed Wedn esday no longer allows t he state to tem porarily withhold payme nts when it gets low on cash. Twice in th e last couple of y ears, the WoodardDekruifDayton See BUDGET, 10A By Suzanne Ro ok [email protected] dnews.com For years, whenever his family wou ld gather in front of the tele vision, Shea Stremcha would be focused on his sketchboo k. as they watched TV, S t r emc h a’s father, Jeff S t r e m c h a said, his y o u n g e s t son would be drawing, filling one bound pad after another with an array of images: designs, cars, creatures, people. Family and fri ends say Stremcha, 25, wasn’t just creative, but t hat he also overflowed with energy and enthusiasm. “He had a zest for life,” Jeff Stremcha sa id of his son who was shot an d killed early Wednesday in an apparent home invasion at the south Minneapolis hom e he shared with his fian cée, ashley Faeth. On Friday, polic e arrested a 23-year-old m an and a 27- year-old man in connection with the 2004 Northfield High School grad uate’s death. The two were booked into Hennepin count y Jail where they wait for inv estigators to take their case t o the county attorney for poss ible charges. Police haven’t s peculated on what mo tivated the killing. Jesse Stremcha, the oldest of the Stremc ha siblings, remembers his brother as a young man who loved motorcycles an d cars — especially a 197 9 Trans am nicknamed “The Bandit” that he restored. along with their father, the two brothers enj oyed visiting the North Shor e, hiking on the Superior Tra il and annual motorcycle trips. Recently the three rode to Me mphis, Tenn. Police arrest 2 in Northfield man’s death See ARREST, 5A Stremcha
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 15  Weeklies over 5,000–9 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader I really liked the layout, crisp color, sections and diversity of the editions. Nice job! Second Place: Forest Lake Times This was a paper I would look forward to reading. I liked the sections, sports photos are much crisper than ours!!! Dailies under 10,000–8 entries First Place: Owatonna People’s Press Great wedding feature. Also liked the Gold Coupons section. Great way to build more value than newstand price of product. Second Place: The Journal, New Ulm Good mix of news and advertising. Several good programs for small business owners. Dailies 10,000 and over–3 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Great newspaper entries overall. Second Place: St. Cloud Times Good use of creative ads and positions. First time I’ve seen neon green as the spot color selected for classifieds. Like it. Strong newspaper showing. Weeklies up to 2,500–9 entries First Place: Pelican Rapids Press A nicely done classified section. Very well organized, clean, easy to navigate. The section is consistent from week to week. The Service Directory is one of the best ones I’ve seen for a smaller publication. Second Place: Tyler Tribute Section is clean, well put together. Weeklies over 2,500–11 entries First Place: Morrison County Record, Little Falls Impressive breadth and depth of ads. Very well designed. A one- stop shop for your community! Second Place: Mille Lacs Messenger, Isle Well-designed section. Like the use of graphics on category head- ers. Solid section week-to-week. Classified Ad Section 75 cents Newsstand Friday TITLE GONE Albert Lea takes Big 9 wrestlin g title from Owatonna See page B1 January 14, 2011 OPINION A4 // OBITUA RIES A5 // COMMUNIT Y A6 // HEALTH A6 // SPORTS B1-2 // COM ICS B3 // CLASSIFIEDS B4-7 INDEX owatonna.com Vol. 97 No. 11 16 Pages Two Sections OUTSIDE TOMORROW Light Snow High 19 • Low 8 Local weather — Page B7 New survey shows rise in ADHD • In tomorrow’s People’s Press [|xbIDFDCy00011kzU VIDEO Looking back Minn. wants Wis. to pay $59M from old tax deal. • LOCAL NEWS, A3 Back taxes Annual State of the City address recaps 2010. INSIDE Federal grant puts local jobless to work in flood zones. • LOCAL NEWS, A2 Water work A NATION DIVIDEDSOUTHERN SUDAN VOTES ON INDEPENDENCE Joining in the historic vote were m em- bers of the Nuer tribe, who wors hip with local Sudanese lay minister, Gatbe l Paleak, at Owatonna’s St. John Lutheran Church. Paleak and fellow Sudanese refuge es trav- eled by caravan Saturday to Om aha and spent the night waiting for the polls to open Sunday morning to could ca st their independence-seeking votes. “When we vote, they take you to a r oom, you sign and show your right to v ote and they show you how to vote — one for unity, one for separate,” Paleak sa id. “Two hands together mean unity and one for separate. If you wanted to choos e unity, you put finger print on that box.” Since Sudan’s independence in 1956, the northern part of the country h as bat- tled the south — a war that kille d 2 mil- lion Sudanese from 1983 to 200 5, when a peace treaty was finally signed. “Sudan became independent in 1956, so we worked on unity — no rth and south. But we want our own gove rnment because the people of the north d o noth- ing for the south,” Paleak said. Now the southerners have a ch ance to vote their way into complete in depen- dence from the north. Registration for the vote started Nov. 15, with almost four million citize ns reg- istering before the Dec. 5 deadlin e . The polls opened Jan. 9, and by Wedn esday, a representative of the referendum c ommis- sion announced the 60-percent turnout threshold required for the refere ndum’s validity had been reached, which is good news for Southerners hoping to create more inhabitable towns and villag es. AP photos Above, James Chol, a 31-ye ar-old Lost Boy from Southern Sudan w ho lives in Phoenix, shows his ink staine d finger at a voter registration facility in Glendale, Ariz. on Nov. 26, 2010. Local Sudanese support bid for secess ion AP photos Pro-separation activists hold s igns and chant pro-independe nce slogans outside the Juba airport in southern Sudan on J an. 4. Southerners commenced voti ng in an independence refere ndum on January 9, the outco me of which will determine w hether the south secedes to form the world’s newest country. By CLARE KENNEDY [email protected] OWATONNA — Next up on U.S. Senator Al Franken’s agenda: The trade deficit. “One of the things I learned today was a little bit of the un - even playing field with China o n excise taxes or tariffs on glass ,” Franken, a Democrat first elec t- ed in 2008, said Thursday on a visit to Owatonna. “I’m goin g to look into that and make sur e that our trade agreements ar e enforced and we aren’t chump s. I don’t want to be chumps i n trade.” Franken was not sure how this came to pass. More researc h was necessary on his part, h e said, but what he had heard s o far from officials at Viraco n concerns him. “If there’s a 30 percent tariff on our (glass) going into Chin a and a 5 percent tariff on the ir stuff coming here, that’s a n uneven playing field,” Franke n said. “I’m going to get to th e bottom of that.” Franken toured the plant floor at Viracon — a glass fabricatio n company that is the largest em - ployer in the local manufactu r- ing sector — watching as shee ts of glass bound for the forme r site of the World Trade Cente r made their way down the lin e. In 2007, Viracon was awarded a contract to supply glass to pro j- ects on the site, including th e Freedom Tower. “I love that the World Trade Center is being built right her e in Minnesota,” Franken said . “Manufacturing is a very impo r- tant part of the economy here, i n this part of Minnesota. We have to make things in the U.S.A . and we have to make high tech products like this glass.” Clare Kennedy/People’s Press U.S. Senator Al Franken, left , and Bill Wright, VP of oper ations at Viracon, examine a glass panel on Thursday. Franken’s team made a circuit of the re gion this week. By CLARE KENNEDY [email protected] OWATONNA — With 2010 in the past and a new year upon us, city officials took stock with their annual State of the City address. The last 12 months brought a few new business- es and a dash of residential development, free boneless chicken wings for a select few, and of course, an epic flood. Though no one is quite sure what 2011 will bring, one thing is certain: The city council will not contemplate a roundabout at the intersection of Mineral Springs Road and Cherry Street, though the subject did come up again. “Is there any chance that you may revisit the round- about? There seemed to be such a rush because Kwik Trip was quick to build and nothing is happening,” said Jerry Zetah, one of the only members in the audience of the sparsely attended event. The proposed roundabout was one issue that just would not die in 2010, in spite of widespread opposition to the plan. After a punchy public hearing in early February 2010, the council voted the measure down, only to have it resurface again when city employee Dave Gerhartz re- peatedly pushed the council to reconsider. The council voted it down again in early May. City administrator Kris Busse said that she thought it was a done deal. “We’ve made our plans. We’ve done our engineer- ing and everything,” Busse said. “There didn’t seem to be any futuristic thinking,” Zetah said. “I was listen- ing to several of the meet- ings. It wasn’t futuristic at all. It was all black and white, concrete, that we have to do it so they don’t bail out.” Busse and others said that the issue had been discussed and studied very thorough- ly. Council Member Nathan Dotson added that he did not want to set a precedent that would suggest that enough arm-twisting could get the council to go back on a fair vote. Most of the presentation centered on events like the realignment of Highway 14 — a $52 million project that has been in progress for two years — and new businesses that came to town. Though hardly a banner year, 2010 did bring some new development to town. Among them was a new manufacturer called Vision Processing Technologies, which makes powders for instant hot drinks by Green Mountain — cocoas and teas. The last 12 months also brought several new restau- rants to town: Owatonna Restaurant, Jimmy Johns, Buffalo Wild Wings and a new Chinese carry-out res- taurant. Mayor Tom Kuntz added that, at least anecdotally, Owatonna is in a relatively strong economic position with its robust commercial areas along the interstate highway. Council looks at 2010 in annual address Franken stops at Viracon as part of regional tour By ASHLEY PETERSON • [email protected] From the millions lin ing up to vote in the blazing south Sudan sun to the thousands braving the winter blizzards to vote in Omaha, Neb., Sudanese across the glo be are jubilantly voting in a first-ever referendu m that could allow the primarily Christian south to secede from the overwhelmingly Muslim north. See FRANKEN page A2 See ADDRESS page A3 See REFERENDUM page A3 Dayton weighs executive orders left by Pawlenty. • MINNESOTA NEWS, A7 Old orders A1 The Auto Connection Quality Body Repair Insurance Work Expert Refinishing Glass Installation Phone 863-303021 8th Ave NW, Pelican Rapids (behind the Pelican Mote l) Alan Johnson, owner BODY SHOP BODY SHOP BODY SHOP PERRIN AUTO BODY Complete Body Repair Expert Refinishing Frame Straighting 12 6th Ave. NE Pelican Rapids MN 863-4992 PETE’S Body Shop, Inc. 23 1/2 HOUR TOWING Automotive Unlock ing Service Complete Auto Body Repair Glass installation Expert Refinishing Frame Straightening • FREE ESTIMATES • 642 2nd Ave SE Pelican Rapids, MN 56 572 (218) 863-PETE (7383) PARTS CLASSIFIEDS TH E RESSP Page 3B June 22, 2011 FOR SALE F OR SALE WORK WANTEDFOR RENT WANTED HELP WANTED H ELP WANTED HE LP WANTED GET YOUR MESSAGE OUT! Advertise in the SERVICE DIRECTORY CALL 218-863-1421 IT’S WORTH THE SHO RT DRIVE, EXIT 54 I-9 4 • FERGUS FALLS 218-739-3247 or 1-800 -666-0952 Sales Hours: 9 am - 6 pm • Service & Parts Hours: 7:30 am - 5:30 pm Sales: Paul Tysver, Ric h Lutzwick, Brian Shore s, Erick Swanson, Tim Engelhart, Steve W eber, Paul Langseth, Pe te Thom Visit us on the web www.qua litytoyota.netQUALITY TOYOTA CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! To place your unwan ted items in the Pelican Press Ca ll 218-863-1421. We get Results! BUSINESS BRIEFS SERVICES NEW & USED STEI GER TRACTOR PARTS SAVE 10%-30% Made in the USA BIG TRACTOR PAR TS 1-800-982-1769 PLUMBING & GRAVEL, L .L.P. Erhard, MN Backhoe & Bobcat work Class 5 Gravel Excavation • Septic Sys tems Call for all of your excavating and demo proje cts. Phone 218-842-5100 Fax 218-842-5204 James Anderson Construction, L LC • New Homes • Re modeling • Additions • Garage s • Shingling 218.532.7486 SHULSTAD BUILDERS HOMES REMODELING CABINETS COUNTERT OPS INSULATED POURED W ALLS Insured Tom 863-3172 Lic.No.00 06269 AA APPRAISALS Home Lakeshore Farm STEVE ZIMMERMAN 218-863-2706 44499 Monument Beac h Loop Prairie Lake, Pelican R apids Lic. #4000004 DEAN NELSON SALES & SERVICE Quality Service Since 1984 • Geo Thermal Heating & Air Conditioning • Heating & Air Condition ing • Hydronic Radiant Floor Heating • Outdoor Wood & Corn F urnaces • Air Quality Issues • Biomass/Corn Stoves, G as Fireplaces DEAN NELSON 218-863-5345 218-770-4495 CONCRETE WORK Sidewalks - Drivewa ys Patios Bobcat Work Rip Rap - Landscapin g BLAKE MELAND Home: 218-863-6482 Cell: 218-770-8926 Black Dirt Compost • P ad Building Lot Clearing • Fill San d • Dozer Work Approaches • Drivewa ys • Snow Removal RANDY & JORDAN ARN TSON 16606 State Hwy 34 • Pelican Rapids, MN Home: 218-863-437 4 Randy cell: 218-731 -4714 Jordan cell: 218-731 -7887 CONSTRUCTION, LLC ARNTSON Licensed by State of Minnesota 218-747-2039 ASHBY, MN WELL DRILLING AND REPAIR HOME • FARM CITY • IRRIGATION Pump Sales & Service “If Better Wells Are M ade We’ll Make ‘Em” Over 50 Years of S uccessful Service! 218-747-2039 ASHBY, MN WELL DRILLING AND REPAIR HOME • FARM CITY • IRRIGATION Pump Sales & Servic e “If Better Wells Are Made We’ll Make “Em” Robertson Well Drilling, Inc. Licensed by State of Minnesota OUREN CONSTRUCTION, INC Erhard, MN For all your construction needs. Homes, Garages, Conc rete, Agricultural, Shingling , Remodeling, Custom B obcat Lic. # 0005499 Call Eugene or Steve 842-5172 8 42-5311 Class 5 Rip-Rap Black Dirt Recycled Concre te Recycled Asphal t Washed Sand & Rock Excavation Landscaping Septic Systems Backhoe & Bobcat Work Custom Crushi ng & Hauling Demolition EGGE CONSTRUCTION, INC. Pelican Rapids, MN 56572 218-863 -5886 In Business ove r 50 Years GENERAL CONTRAC TING • ROOFING & D ECKS REMODELS • NEW C ONSTRUCTION HEATING • A/C • AIR EXCHANGERS VENTILATION • DUC T WORK BRIAN STUVLAN D 218-205-8205 JEFF HEATON 218-731-0804 Lic.# 20634381 - B onded & InsuredPELICA N RAPIDS, MN LLC 218-841-1292 LANDSCAPING www.lakesareaserv ices.com LANDSCAPE DESI GN FREE ESTIMATES HOMEHOME IMPRIMPROOVEM ENTVEMENT SPECIALISSPECIALI STTSS TTO ADO ADVERVERTISE YTISE YOUR HOMEOUR HOME IMPRIMPROOVEMENT CVEMENT COMPOMPANYANY CCALL 2ALL 2118-863-18-863-14 24211 SERVICE DIRECT ORY CALL 218-863-1421 TO GET YOUR BUSINESS IN TH E SERVICE DIRECT ORY! CAXCA Residential & Commercial Lawn Care Peter Scott, Ow ner 218-731-3393 Pelican Rapids, MN THE YARDW ORKS Lawn Care &M aintenance • Mow & Trim • Thatching • Pruning • Vacuuming • Edging • Home Checks • Snow Remova l JASON HARLO W, PELICAN RAPID S YEAR-ROUND SER VICE DISCOUNTS Serving the Lakes Area Since 1994 INSURED Cell: 320-766-02 21 PELICAN RAPIDS T OWNHOMES 2 & 3 Bedroom To wnhomes • 1.5 Baths • Full Size Wash er & Dryer • Spacious Close ts & Storage • Water, Sewer, & Garbage • Playground & P icnic Area for Families • Garage, Plug-in s Enjoy the Peacefu l & Tranquil Setting Along the River. Call Linda today at 218-863-4810, or email at [email protected] minc.com Come Live With U s! MIDWEST TREE and Maintenance 218-863-1400 www.midwesttree.ne t TREE SERVICE LANDSCAPING RIP-RAP TED’S CONCRETE Driveways, Sidewal ks, ICF & Block Founda tions, Rock, Cultured Ston e, Tile, Paving Stone ALL OF YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS ! 218-205-3147 GET YOUR MESSAGE OUT! Advertise in the SERVICE DIRECTORY CALL 218-863-1421 THE BEST F LOOR HEAT WATER TUBING , also stainless steel outdoor wo odburning fur- naces. Order now, save. $600.00 to $12 00.00. All for Guaranteed Lo west Prices. Highest quality. w ww.mikesheat- ing.com 1-800-44 6-4043. tfc ———————— —————— OUTDOOR WO ODBURNING FURNACES, All stainless Steel. Lifetime Warran ty, Save with early buy disco unts.GUARAN- TEED LOWEST PRICES. Free Estimates! www.m ikesheating.com. 1-800-446-4043. tfc ———————— —————— FOR SALE: R ubber Stamps Royal Mark self -inking stamps as low as $16.05 . Ideal self-ink- ing stamps as l ow as $14.20. Pocket stamps $17.40. Notary stamps $25.50. Date Stampers $5.20. Stamp pads. Photo Plaques and aw ards, Custom engraving signs , Name tags, Pocket Badges. Pelican Rapids Press. tfc ———————— —————— FOR SALE: No te pads 3 for $1.00. Pelican R apids Press. ———————— —————— FOR SALE: FOL TZ BUILDINGS - Completely erected post- framed buildings , machine stor- age, shops, com mercial, horse and cattle buildin gs. 1-800-255- 9981. 1-28-tfnc ———————— —————— WANTED TO BUY: Paying $2.09 for each d ime dated 1964 and before. Bu ying old coins and gold rings an d things. Allan Schoenberger 87 7-847-1023.(Toll free.) 1-19-tfcw ———————— —————— www.affordablecu stomhomes.net Come experience customer service the way it was m eant to be! new home packages st arting at $85. Per square foot.www .ModernLiving Concepts.com 218 -841-2006 5-25-tfcw FOR SALE: Din ing room table, six chairs, 6’x9 ’ oriental rug, exercise bike. PHONE 863- 5540. 6-22-pd ———————— —————— FOR SALE: The N EW 2010 Otter Tail, Becker, Cl ay and Wilkin County Plat Book s are available now at the Pelica n Rapids Press. $31.00 + tax. TRANSFER VHF/C AMCORDER TAPES to DVD: LP’s /Cassettes to CD. The Sound S hop, Detroit Lakes. 1-800-240 -8901 or the- [email protected] et.net 6-22-c ———————— —————— WORK WANTED : Now schedul- ing spring and su mmer painting and finishing. C all Thompson Painting at 218-8 63-5368 12-2-tfc FOR RENT: Two and three bed- room low income housing units. A handicap unit may be avail- able Rental assi stance is avail- able. Heat, w ater, garbage included in rent. Equal Housing Opportunity. Ridgecrest Apartments. For application call 218-863-6600. tfc ———————— —————— FOR RENT: On e and two BR apartments, all u tilities included. Pets allowed. Re nt incentive of one month free w /12 mo. lease. Please call 1-88 8-710-7764 or 218-329-5063. 9-9-tfc ———————— —————— FOR RENT: One and two bed- room apartment s with garage. Water, sewe r, included. Riverside Apartm ents. 218-863- 2113. 9-16-tfc VISIT OUR S ERVICE AND REPAIR DEPA RTMENT We repair snowblowe rs, Chain Saws, and Small Eng ines. Lakeland True Value Hardw are. 863-5703.tfc ———————— —————— SAW SHARPE NING: Expert service on carb ide and steel saws, router bi ts, jointer and planer knives.Str and Hardware, Pelican Rapids 8 63-1811. tfc HELP WANTED : Subway and Southtown are cu rrently hiring for evening help. P lease apply in person. 3-9-tfc ———————— —————— HELP WANTE D: Part-time female caregive r. Experience preferred. Must speak fluent English. Good cooking skils required. Crystal Lake Inn. 701- 212-5294. 6-1-tfc ———————— —————— HELP WANTED: The City of Pelic an Rapids is see king an afternoon receptionist. Thi s position will pr ovide skilled rec eptionist, accoun t- ing and data entr y work to suppor t city services inc luding utility billin g customer servic e, financial spre adsheets, meeti ng agendas an d notices, filing an d copying. Gree ts public and an swers telephone lines, determine s the nature o f business, pro vides informatio n, answers questio ns, refers inqui ries to appropri ate departments , accepts paymen ts and helps pro cess utility bills. The successfu l candidate will ha ve excellent com puter skills and experience with Microsoft Office W ord, Excel and A ccess programs as well as expe- rience working w ith people. Appli cations are availa ble at City’s web site, www.Pelica nRapids.com, C ity Hall, 315 N. B roadway, Pelican Rapids or call 218-863-7076. Completed appl ications may be dropped off at C ity Hall, mailed to PO Box 350 or faxed to 218-863 - 7077 (if faxed, m ail original). Appl ications will be a ccepted until 5:0 0 p.m. on Wednes day, 06-22-11. 6-22-2c WANTED: Loo king to buy weaned New Zealand or California Rabb its, not regis- tered, for the fr eezer. Contact 218-205-0017. L eave Message. 6-29-2pdx �������������������������������� ������� ������ ������������������������ � ��������������������� ���� ������� ������ �������� � ���������� ��� ����������������� �������� ������ ������ ������������������������ � �������������� ������������������������� ����������������� ���� ��� ������������� ����� � ��� ������ ���������� ���� ������� ����������� ��� ����� ���� ������������� �� ������ ���������� �� ������ ������ ��� ��� ���������������������������������������������������� ������� ����� ���������������������� �� ��������� �� ������������ �������� �������� ���������������������� ������� ����������������������� ��� ��� �� ����������� ���� ��� ���������������� ����������������� ��� �� ������������ ������������ �������������� ������������������� ��� ������������� ��������������������������������� ������ �������������������� ��� � ��������� ��������������� ��� ����������������� ��������� ������ ��� �������� ���������������������� ������ ��� ��� � ���� ��� ������������������������ ���� ��� �������������������������������������������� � ������� � ������������� ������� ��� ������ ������ �� ����� ������������� ������ �������� ������ ������������ � ������ ������ �� � ����� ��� ���� ���������� ����������������������� ������� ��� ����� ��� �� ������ ������������� ���� � ����� �������������� ������� �������� �������� ��� ���� ����������� ������������� �������������� ��� �������� ���� ���� ������ �� ���������� ����������������� ��������������� ��������� �������� � ��������������������� � ���������������� ���������������������������� ��� ����������������� ������ ���� ������������������������� ���� ����� �������������������� ����� ������ ��� �������� ��� ���� �� ���������� ��� ���� �������������������� ��� ��������������������� ��� ��������������������������� �������� ��������� � ����� ��� �������������� ��� �������������� ��� ����������� ��� ���� �������� �������������������� ��� ���� ����������������������������� ������� � ������ ������������ ��������� � ���� ��������������� ��������������������������� ������������������������������������������������� � ����� ����������� �������� ����������������������� ���������� � ������������������ � ������������ � ���� �������� ������� � ����������� �������������������������������� ����������������� ����� �������� � ���������������� � ������ ���� ������� ����� ������� ������������������ ����������� ��������� ��������� �� ������������� ���� ���� ����������������������� ������ �������� ����������������� ����� ������������� ���������� ����������� ���� ������������������������ ������ � ������� ����������� �������� �������� �������������� ����� � �������� ��������������������������� ������ �������� ���� ����������������� ��� ���� ���� ��������� ���������������������������������� ������ ��� � ���� ��� ���� �� ��������������� �������� ����� ������������ ����� ������������������ ��������������������� ������������������� ����� ���������������� CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 16 All Dailies–11 entries First Place: Sentinel, Fairmont Eye-catching use of color. Like the Professional & Service Directory. Well-organized section. Second Place: The Journal, New Ulm Visually-appealing section. Great service directory. Consistent amount of ads, week-to-week. Weeklies up to 1,500–4 entries First Place: Kenyon Leader Clean and easy to navigate. I especially like the reader focus, spotlighting readers’ photos and prominently displaying their recent comments and top reads. Second Place: Tri-County News, Kimball Bold visuals make finding top stories easy, as does the list of recently updated/posted stories. Robust calendar tool and easy navigation. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–7 entries First Place: Farmington Independent A user-friendly design and strong focus on soliciting reader participation make the Independent the clear winner. An excellent community website. Second Place: ECM Post Review, North Branch The Post Review site proves that clean and simple can still be ef- fective and award-worthy. Features are easy to find and navigate to and photos are used effectively. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–10 entries First Place: Shakopee Valley News Clean, easy-to-navigate site. Easy access to top headlines on front page as well as clearly-defined section links. Like special page dedicated to multimedia. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune User-friendly site with ready access to all features at the top of the homepage. Like scrolling image header and links to latest and most read news on the homepage. Business page is great for a weekly newspaper! WebsiteIf You’re Planning a Special Event,Publicize it in the Classified Columns. You’ll Have a GREAT TURNOUT! 507-235-3303 CONSTRUCTION LABORERS E80 Plus Constructors, LLC, a national railroad bridge construction company, has immediate openings for construction laborers! Position requires ability to travel nationally in a job-to-job nature, conduct physical manual labor in varied weather conditions & no fear of heights. A valid driver’s license is a must. Excellent starting wage of $15-$17 per hour commensurate with experience, as well as $43/day travel subsistence. Wage premiums paid for stick welders & CDL holders. Send resume to [email protected] or contact Brenda at 888-846-6310 to re- quest an applications. EOE/M/F/D/V DRIVERS, WE Have immediate openings for construction truck drivers. We offer excellent start- ing pay, health in- surance and travel allowance. Must have Class A CDL, clean driving record and medical card. Call Rod at Myles Lorentz 507-625-3886 FAIRMONT AREA SCHOOLS is seeking to fill the following positions: Part-Time and Substitute Food Service Workers. Candidates must be able to work well with staff and students, serve meals, and perform limited clean up duties. The part-time position will be at the high school ;NIP9P�[email protected] throughout the school year, 11:30 a.m. – 1:45 p.m. Substitute Workers would be on an on-call basis to work at Fairmont Elementary or the High School. Hours for substitutes will vary. Apply at the Fairmont Work Force Center, 412 S State Street, Five Lakes Centre, Fairmont, MN 56031. Phone 507-235-5518. FULL TIME position working with machinery and livestock. References required. 507-773-4544 Office Assistant Data Entry, Inventory Control, Purchasing skills a must. Must be albe to use Mi- crosoft Word and Excel. Bilingual a plus but not re- quired. Please apply in person at: Mary Ann’s Specialty Foods 1511 East 2nd St Webster City, IA 50595 515-832-4740 1038 - Special Occasions 1048 - Happy Ads Forgotten Photos Stop in today to pick up any photo you may have brought in for an ad. 1500 Miscellaneous Need your classified ad to jump out and be noticed add a yellow screen to your ad for as little as $10 per day 1508 - Professional Communication Paraprofessional Prairie Lakes Area Education Agen- cy currently has an opening for a communica t ion paraprofessional in our Fort Dodge office beginning with the 11-12 school year. This individual will sup- port the work of Speech-Language Pathologists in developing the speech and language skills of children. Qualifi- cations include a minimum of a high school diplo- ma, (Associate degree preferred). Continued em- ployment will be conditional on successful com- pletion of the P a r a e d u c a t o r Generalist I Certi- ficate. Applicants must have good communica t ion skills and ability to relate to the student population being served. To apply for this po- sition please sub- mit an application which can be ob- tained through our website at: http://www. aea8. k12.ia.us/en / human_resourc es/current_ open- ings / We also require a letter of applica- tion and resume. These items can be sent to: Prairie Lakes AEA 500 NE 6th St. PO Box 802 Pocahontas, IA 50574 Attn: D Gade Application are be- ing taken August 26th Prairie Lakes AEA is an EEO/AA em- ployer. Minorities and under-represented groups are en- couraged to apply. 1510 - Medical CNA/PCA POSITIONS CK Home Health Care Inc., is currently hiring CNA/PCA’s to work in private homes in Min- neota, MN Variety of part time shifts available. We offer competitive wages and bene- fits. Please call 218-998-3778 for more information. 1514 Transportation 1526 - Full Time Wanted Assistant Manager Murphy USA is currently seeking a assistant manager for the Fort Dodge site. Our gasoline kiosk is located on the parking lot of Wal-Mart Su- percenter. Start- ing pay $10 per hour depending upon experience, monthly commis- sions, vacation. Applicants should possess strong leadership skills, solid basic retail math skills and enjoy supervision. Prior management experience is a plus. Apply on line at MurphyUSA.com EOE-MHFV 1526 - Full Time Wanted 1526 - Full Time Wanted 1514 Transportation 1500 Miscellaneous 1500 Miscellaneous 1500 Miscellaneous 1044 Entertainment Classifieds Entertainment Employment Real Estate Farm ing Rummage Sales Automotive • Marshalltown • Dysart• T raer • Webster City • EmmetsburgE stherville • Fort Dodge • Gladbrook • • Fairmont • Blue Earth Reinbeck • • New Ulm • Marshall Iowa-Minnesota • Tama • Toledo Midwest Regional Classified Network MRCN SPECIAL THE BEST DEALS ON WHEELS Midwest Regional Classified Network 25 Words 5 days for the price of 3 days ... $140 25 Words 10 days for the price of 7 Days ... $237 $5.75 each additional word Your network ad will appear in 27 papers in Iowa and Minnesota. Reach over 500,00 0 readers with just one phone call. Your ad will also appear on jobs.FarmontSentinel.com PLACING AN AD IS EASY Call Your Ad In: (507) 235-3303 or 1-80 0-598-5597 Fax: Your Ad In: (507) 235-3718 Email: [email protected] m Visit Us Online: www.fairmontsentinel. com Bring Your Ad In: 64 Downtown Plaza, Fairmont DEADLINES Line ads 11 am day prior for Monday - Thursday insertion 9 am Thursday for Friday - Saturday in sertion Display as 48 hours prior to insertion HOURS Office Hours: 7:30 am - 5 pm Monday - Friday After Hours: (507) 235-3303 Fax 24 hour 7 days a week: 235-3718 Email: [email protected] m 7 LINES FOR $25 Runs 100 Days! Sell anything on wheels in the classifie d section of the Sentinel. Private party only. STRETCH Your classified dollars further with our SUPER SAVER! 5 lines • 5 days • dollars Single, non commercial items not to exceed $200. Price must be included in ad BRIDAL GUIDE Published the first Thursday of each m onth. The charge is just $30.00 each time. Reach today’s brides with your messa ge WEEKEND EDITION 1C Sentinel-Fairmont, MN, Saturday, August 20 , 2011 People who love money, love the classifieds! LOOKING for a JOB? Read todayʼs Classifieds SHORT on CASH? Make some money fast with a quick -action Classified ad. THE RIGHT buys are yours when you shop the ads in the Classified Ads. Come join a world class manufacturing facility of walk in coolers and freezers. We offer competitive wages for first shift openings. We also pay for on-the-job training, and present a great benefit package. Full time positions available. Pay range $9.00-$14.00; pay based on qualifications and experience. Apply in person between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. or call for an application to be sent to you. E.O.E. Tuesday, Aug. 23 1-5 pm At The Cafe 915 Armstrong, IA JOB FAIR +*))(''&%$'*$#"!& $+*))(''&%$'*$�*� PC/Network Technician ��� �� ���� �� ��� ��� #""! ���������� ��������������"�������� ����� ���� ��"�������� �� � � ���������������� � ���������� ������������������ ��('&%$�*��('"�$�(�'!(#'$�"�$"�$*�&�(��$�*!$" �+��&'�*!�$�&#��(#("� $ &��*��(��&$�*!$'�& (��'"��"'(*��$)"(�'&�"�#&$"�%$����*!'$$*� �+��$ "�'*��$"�%$��(�$+�(&�'�$(�$"$ *#"� !&"$�&'�*!�$���(!*�)&�'$"�*��$�('�$*'�&!$ �&'�*!�&%$�&!(��&!"��$"�%$�'"�%$"�*�&$ #*)��'(��$&��(�)&�' $�*�('*!��$!&��*�%� '*$"�%$%*#�)&�'�$�&��$�&��$#"����$�!*�(%&�$ #*�&!"�&$�*!$�&��$�&��$�&!�(#&��$"%�(�&�$ #*)��'&!$��&!�$*�$#*!!&#'$��"�&$*�$ �"!%�"!&$"�%$�*�'�"!&�$�&!�*!)�$*'�&! '&#��*�*��$!&�"'&%$���#'(*��$"�$�&#&��"!� �!*�(%&$����*!'$'*$!&)*'&$�('&�$�*!�(��$(� +('!(�$"�%$���$&��(!*�)&�' $ ���(#"�' ��*��%$�&$�")(�("!$�('�$%&��'*�$�*�'�"!&$"�% #"�$�&$'!"(�&%$(�$*'�&!$"���(#"'(*��$��&% '�!*���$'�&$�"#(�('� $+*)��'&!$��&!"'*!$ +&!'(�(#"'(*�$�!&�&!!&% $+*)�&'('(�&$�"�"!� "�%$�&�&�('� $��&"�&$�&�%$"���(#"'(*�$*!$ !&��)&$'*� Presentation College is seeking applications for the following open position: Department Chair of Social Work A full-time Department Chair of Social Work faculty position. Social work classes are offered at our campuses in Aberdeen, Eagle Butte, and Sioux Falls, SD and through a growing distance education program. The Social Work Program also offers a BSW completion program in collaboration with Kilian Community College in Sioux Falls. Requirements for the position include MSW with a minimum of two years of experience, (Ph.D. preferred), previous college teaching experience and administrative experience at the college level. Benefit package includes financial assistance toward achieving a doctorate. Applicant must be eligible for appropriate licensures in the State of South Dakota. Career Services and Learning Center Coordinator A part-time position, Career Services and Learning Center Coordinator for the Fairmont Campus. The Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the supervision of tutors and assisting students in making a successful transition from their academic pursuits, to achieve their career/life goals; providing a well-balanced variety of direct services, educational programs, and resource materials, so students may secure meaningful employment or additional education. Bachelor’s degree preferred. Excellent interpersonal, organizational, oral and written communication and computer skills are required. Interested applicants for either position should email letter of application, resume, names and contact information for three professional and three personal references to [email protected] or mail to Linda Jo Van Dover, Presentation College Human Resources Department, 1500 North Main Street, Aberdeen SD 57401. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until position is filled. EEOZIERKE BUILT MFG. a growing metal fabrication ISO certified com pany, is seeking a DESIGN ENGINEER/DRAFTER to become part of our engineering departme nt. Must have SolidWorks and AutoCAD experie nce. A strong knowledge of structural steel, shee t metal and trailer design, assembly, and BOM is highly recommended. Ability to communicate and develop good w orking relationships within the organization, as wel l as customer service, is preferred. Strong problem solving , organizational skills and multi-tasking requi red. Benefits and competitive wage offered. Apply at: 120 6th Ave. SE, Winnebago, MN 56098 HELP WANTED: WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE PART OF A TEAM? Full-Time Night Shift LPN/RN. Includes every other weekend and holiday. Competitive wages. 401K & Health Insurance offered. STOP BY FOR AN APPLICATION: Colonial Manor 403 Colonial Avenue Lakefield, MN 56150 or call 507-662-6646 and ask Renee Dayton for more information. Westman Freightliner, located in Fairmont, MN, has an opportunity for an experienced mechanic eager to work in the fast moving trucking industry. This is a full time position with full benefits; pay is based on background experience. If you have a strong work ethic and desire to succeed, please send resume to [email protected] or call 507-344-2503. Elmore Truck and Trailer Service is currently seeking a full-time CERTIFIED DIESEL MECHANIC with experience. Requires the ability to diagnose and repair heavy duty trucks and trailers. Must be able to take instruction, responsible for your work, and be a team player. Elmore Truck and Trailer Service is a full service shop. Apply in person: 305 Hwy 169 S. Elmore, MN 56027 1-888-413-5818 Position Opening: Special Education Paraprofessional (B-2-1) Blue Earth Area High School Approx. 6.5 hours/day Position. open until filled Contact: Jack Eustice, Principal Blue Earth Area High School 1125 Hwy. 169 N. Blue Earth, MN 56013 507-526-3201 YSI ELMORE ACADEMY has an immediate opening for a PT COOK Competitive wages. Please call (507) 943-3440 or stop in for an application. ELMORE ACADEMY 202 E. North St., P.O. Box 98, Elmore, MN 56027 EOE Korte’s Bar & Grill Welcome, MN 728-8820 Sunday August 21 st 4 pm-8 pm STEVE LANG DRIVERS: Rabbe, Inc. is looking for full-time drivers for local hauling. Late model day cab tractors. Home every night. Hourly wage. Must have CDL and good driving record. Call 507-736-2004 for application. Classified Ad Section CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 17  Weeklies over 5,000–4 entries First Place: Echo Press, Alexandria User-friendly home page design. Nice use of external links; particularly liked recipe card, blog links and Talk About This Topic. Second Place: Star News, Elk River Liked useful elements such as clear links to RSS feeds from sections, Letter to Editor submission form, announcement submissions and section for public notices. All Dailies–8 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune I liked a lot of the details that made the site more useful to its audience: weather alert box under the regular weather info, Talk about it link with stories, clearly-labeled links to outside news sources, Browse by Date button on section pages. Clean design that includes enough art elements for interest without getting overwhelmed by them. The high school pages and Scrapbook section seemed to effectively draw on community. Second Place: Brainerd Dispatch Clean design avoids confusing readers. Nice use of vertical art, which is often not used on news sites. All Individuals–35 entries First Place: Echo Press, Alexandria, Nichole Roell & Stacy Haaven Integrity Title Very Professional. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Dave Aune Norby’s Campaign Excellent Campaign. Honorable Mention: White Bear Press, Alicia Streiber Athlete of the Week Great Concept. Advertising Campaign
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 18 Institutional Advertisement Sponsored by these community minded businesses Bloomfield FarMutual Insurance Co. Chateau de Chic CHS Culver’s of Rochester Essig Agency, Inc. First LeRoy Agency First State Bank Minnesota Foster Construction Fowler’s bp & Valley Wash Gold Street Pizza Lee Himle Insurance Agency Home Federal Savings Bank Hyland Motor Company Kappers Fabricating Inc. Kuehn Motor Co. & Body Shop Kwik Trip Stores Marburger Insurance Services - Mark Marburger Matt’s Body Shop & Tire Service Marzolf Implement Co. McConnell Electric NAPA Auto Parts Pioneer Seeds – Paul & Judy Frank Quilters Quarters Security State Bank Simpson’s A&W Drive-In Spring Valley Dental Center Spring Valley Tribune Spring Valley Vet Clinic State Farm Insurance - Mark Biermann Sunshine Foods Thauwald Funeral Home Thompson Motors of Wykoff, Inc. Zeimetz Motors Congratulations stateat the AndreaClementAndre aClement Kingsland state meet record for 36 holes (179) Fifth best individual in Section 1AA meet 39th place out of 88 golfers competing at state Only state athletic participant from Kingsland in 2010-11 school year Tribune, Spring Valley, Minn - June 22, 2 011 - 11 Summer living magazine 5 Follow us on www.firesidedl.com 1462 E Shore Drive • Detroit Lakes218.847.8192 Open 7 Nights a Week at 5pm Everything You’d Expect From A Fine Dining Restaurant. Except The Attitude. 253-1050 • 1-800-335-3866 • www.callanfurniture.com 2 Miles West of Crossroads on Divis ion M-Th 10-8 • Fri. 10-9 • Sat. 10-5 • S un. 12-5 CALLAN’S F U R N I T U R E Le t ou r Des i g n P ro f e s s i o na l s As s i s t You . Decorating Solutions START HERE. Our design consultants are not simply interested in selling furniture. Their passion is to help you create the home you want and need. That is why many of o ur clients have asked Callan’s to guide them through the de corating process–from choosing the perfect sofa for a Great Room to building an entire room’s layout. For many, decora ting is a challenge that can be overwhelming. But the truth is, we make decoratin g fun and easy–in five simple steps. STEP 1: Greeting her client, a design consultant gives her a tour of the showroom and as they talk , she is able to help her client define her style and get a sense of the solutions she needs. She then arranges to make a h ouse call. STEP 2: Visiting her customers home allows the design consultant to familiarize herself with it s layout and take measurements. Afterward, she will pu t together a floor plan so that the customer can see how the furniture might fit in the rooms and explore different possi bilities. STEP 3: Back in the store, this consu ltant presents her floor plan, along with some furniture choice s to her client. Once the furniture designs are agreed upon , she and her client will choose the fabrics that will work best for the furniture design. STEP 4: Rooms are not complete wit hout the perfect finishing touches. Accents can enhan ce a color scheme, introduce a texture, bring a sense of e legance or provide a function (e.g. lighting, clocks). STEP 5: After the furnishing choices h ave been finalized, the design consultant reviews the fina ncing options and the order is placed. Once the furniture and accessories have been delivered, she can visit her client again, making sure everything looks good and that h er client is thoroughly satisfied. COMPLIMENTARY IN HOME DESIGN AVAILABLE Amish Solid Wood Collections NOW 20% OFF Weeklies up to 2,500–14 entries First Place: Spring Valley Tribune, Lisa Vaupel Kingsland Golf Beautiful, what else can I say except great idea that was well executed. Second Place: The Paynesville Press, Andrew Enninga First Baby of the New Year This is too cute. I wanted to look at it again, and again. Weeklies over 2,500–17 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Mary Brenk Fireside Restaurant Mary Brenk did a really nice job of matching the quality of the fine-dining establishment with a clean layout, food appeal and one clear message/focal point. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Mary Brenk & Luanna Lake Central Floral-For all of life’s special occasions Very clean layout with a concise message and one clear message/ focal point. Honorable Mention: Echo Press, Alexandria, Deb Zens, Karla Mikkelson & Izzy Rusch Super Pizza Party Cute/unique way to advertise coupons for a pizza event. All Dailies–36 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times, Gary Schlickenmayer Callan’s Furniture Wonderfully-designed ad. Inviting image. Tells client’s story of making home decorating easy for you. Second Place: Marshall Independent, Derek Jensen Landmark Bistro Gorgeous, visually-appealing ad, showcasing multiple aspects of the business from the food and space, to its group-friendly offerings and daily specials.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 19  Self-Promotion or House Ad Page 12 Thursday, December 16, 2010 Tri-County News • Kimball, MNCommunity * ATM withdrawals and cash advance s are not considered qualifying entrie s. All entries, whether submitted automati cally by using a State Bank of Kimbal l Check Card or by alternate form, have an eq ual chance of winning. Eligibility is to all legal residents of the United States, 18 yea rs of age or older, except employees o f the State Bank of Kimball and their immediate family (spouse, parents, children and siblings and their respective spouses). Busine ss debit cards are not eligible. To enter the sweepstakes without usi ng a State Bank of Kimball Check Car d, print your name, complete mailing addres s and daytime phone number on a 3” x 4” piece of paper and deposit it between 12-1 -10 and 12-31-10 in the designated re ceptacle located in any State Bank of Kimball offi ce. Each piece of paper will count as one qualifying purchase. No purchase ne cessary to win. Winners will be select ed in a random drawing on 1-7-11 and the p rize will be granted to the fi rst named person/ business on the checking account to which qualifying purchases are post ed. STATE BANK OF KIMBALL 0�/��"/8����s�+)-"!,,��-)..%3/4!������ ���� ���� ���� www.statebankofkimbal l . com 10 MEMBER BRANSON ON THE ROAD! Featuring Debbie Horton! Mon & Tues Dec 27 & 28 1:30 & 7:00 Adult: $20 Senior: $18 These MN hometown boys are back for their annual holiday concert! Dec 29 & 30, 7:00 Fri Dec 31, 4:00 Tickets: $12-$24 Back again after 7 sold out shows last year! Dec 20-23 at 7:30 Dec 26 at 2:00 All Tickets: $19 PARAMOUNT THEATRE & VISUAL ARTS C ENTER DOWNTOWN ST. CLOUD MATINEES FREE EVENT PARKING For tickets call 320-259-5463 or order online at paramountarts.org BB Fo DODD WNTOWN ST. CLOUD MATA INEES FREE EVENT PARKINGPP HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT NEXT WE EK! Santa to take calls at DTV Once again, Santa Claus has set aside time in his very busy sched- ule to do a quick tour of the coun- try and find out what boys and girls want for Christmas. Santa will be at DTV Tuesday, Dec. 14, and again Tuesday Dec. 20, between 6 and 6:30 p.m. to take phone calls live on the air. Prior to Santa’s chat with the kids, DTB will feature live music performances from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Boys and girls can call in to the studio and give their first name to the helper answering the phone, then talk directly to Santa. Parents will want to be sure to mark their calendars and call any of these numbers: 351-7288, 256-7444, 597- 7444, and 764-7444. AAAAuxiliary needs aaaddresses The Kimball Americannnn LLeL gion Auxiliary is again askinggggg ffof r the addresses of area peo--- pplp e serving in the United Statesss aara med forces. The purpose is soo o ttht at the auxiliary can remem--- bbber them for the holidays in aaaaa ssps ecial way. Please deposit theeee aada dresses at the Kimballlll PPoP st Office in the RED BOXXXXX nnon t later than Thursday,y,, DDDec. 16. Thank you! Kimball Americannnn Legion Auxiliaryyyyy About 150 brave individuals gathered a t the railroad tracks where they cross H wy. 15 in Kimball to wel- come the Canadian Pacifi c Holiday Trai n at 9 p.m. Monday night, Dec. 13. Even in the sub-zero temper- atures, they cheered, danced, and enjo yed a concert by Melanie Doane and th ree other talented musi- cians. CP Rail employees donated $1,00 0 to our local food shelf. (In the past 10 years, CP Rail’s Holiday Train has raised $4.8 million and 2.3 m illion pounds of food for local food shel ves along its route.) The KAHS National Honor Society raised an additional $2,200 in cash and 5,330 po unds of food during this Holiday Train! past week. (More on that next week!) Staf f photos by Jean Doran Matua. See more in our photo gallery at www.tr icountynews.MN. Weeklies up to 2,500–15 entries First Place: Tri-County News, Kimball, Sue A. Hughes Give Yourself a Gift . . . Subscribe/Renew and SAVE Great holiday-themed promotion. Good call to action, prompting readers to subscribe or renew before Jan. 1 rate increases. Second Place: Tri-County News, Kimball, Sue A. Hughes Our gift to new subscribers: 2-month FREE trial subscription This ad captures the essence of the holiday gift-giving season. Great promotion. Weeklies over 2,500–29 entries First Place: The McLeod County Chronicle, Glencoe, Jessica Bolland Your Hometown Newspaper . . . Clear message, good copy paired with catchy design. Well done! Second Place: Thisweek Burnsville/Eagan, Ellen Reierson No, it’s not a dirty word. Clever design. Clear call to action. Way to send people to your website! All Dailies–19 entries First Place: Brainerd Dispatch, Lisa Henry Toy Box Great humor. Very eye catching. Second Place: St. Cloud Times, Theresa Erdman Restaurant Guide Very user friendly.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 20 Use of Color in Advertising Weeklies up to 2,500–25 entries First Place: Tracy Headlight-Herald, April DeSchepper Business Spotlight December 2010: KirPatrick’s Well-designed ad, visually-appealing use of color. Nice centerpiece ad for the client, highlighting several different ways to connect—including Facebook. Second Place: Spring Valley Tribune, Lisa Vaupel TJ Liquor The designer’s use of color in this ad is tasteful and effective, and plays well with the overall holiday theme of the page as a whole. Weeklies over 2,500–50 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader, Christine Dammann & Marne Long A Tribute to the Heroes of Memorial Day Effective use of color; nice clean design. Good choices on art and fonts. Second Place: Hutchinson Leader, Christine Dammann & Marne Long March is Red Cross Month Very creative use of color! I like how the designer highlighted only the color red for this Red Cross promotion. All Dailies–55 entries First Place: The Free Press, Mankato, Kellie Blanchard No Payments Until 2012! New 2011 KIA Soul! Great use of color and creativity. Second Place: The Free Press, Mankato, Ginny Bergerson Only At North Mankato Family Dentistry Background color works very well with the individual art elements. Great job. Honorable Mention: St. Cloud Times, Angel Amundson Antons Love the white space. Ad message is strengthened by the blend of color and background color.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 21  Best Advertisement CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  Page 2 Thursday, September 16, 2010 Tri-County News • Kimball, MNCommunity Pa id fo r b y t he “B ec au se O ur K ids M at te r” C om mi tte e. N o s ch oo l f un ds w er e u se d t o c re at e o r p ay fo r t his ad . This fall, voters in the Independent School District #739 (the Kimball School District) will be asked to approve two levy questions. #1 will replace the operating money that will go away when the current levy expires at the end of this school year. Adding question #2 will bring additional funding to our schools, allo wing them to pay for much-needed maintenance t hat has had to be postponed (like replacing the element ary gym fl oor), to replace obsolete technology and curriculum, a nd to expand programs as funds allow. Don’t our students DESER VE better than just getting by? We believe they do. And that’s why a group of concerned citizens is making sure people know the dilemma we’re in. Wi th our current levy expiring at the end of this school year, it is IMPERATIVE that at least question #1 pass, just to replac e it. We believe our students deserve the m oneys that question #2 will bring. (Vot ers must approve BOTH questions #1 and #2 in order for the Kimball Schools to receiv e the needed funding to make up for losses and to a ugment what we’ve got. On November 2, we urge you to vote “ Yes, Yes” – voting for both questions. www.BecauseOurKidsMatter.com Funding figures are from the Minneso ta Department of Education website: http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/D ata/Data_Downloads/SchoolFinance /index.htm “16YrGenEdRev96- 11[1]” spreadsheet Levy questions any Levy 8A • Wednesday, May 4, 2011 • the tRIBUne www.dl-online.com WE ATHER AVAILABLE 24 /7 2105907 Holiday Inn on the Lake 1155 Hwy. 10 East • Detroit Lakes, MN 5 6501 218-847-2121 | 1-877-251-9348 www.holidayinndl.com — Entreés — Chef Carved Ham Chicken Marsala served over Orzo Swedish Meatballs Breaded Pollock Breakfast — Items — Scrambled eggs, bacon, pastries, breakfast breads. Smoked Salmon display with toppings, Mashed potatoes & gravy, hot vegetable, salad bar, fresh fruit and vegetable display, Dessert Station and much more. Adults: ..................... $15.99 Seniors: .................... $10.99 Kids: (12 & Under) ......... $6.99 4 & Under ................... FREE Beverages are included in the price. MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS TODAY!! 218-847-2121 The just anot her hangover “Having seen Shields last time the Hangover tour came through town, I assure you the jokes and stories are no-holds- barred, and the tales of sex, drugs, drinking and incorrect politics are sure to offend someone. I laughed. I’m sure you will too.” Bob Doran/North Coast Journal Scot Shields — Limited Seating — Call for ticket availability ROCKSTAR DJ & KARAOKE PLAYING AFTER THE SHOW TOUR Scot Shields & Friends Friday, May 6 • 8:00 pm at the Ice House Restaurant Sunday, May 8 10:30am-2pm — Entreés — Buffet Castle Rock Supper Club & Lounge Hwy. 10, Hawley, MN 218-483-4604 Featuring 20 MINUTES FROM LAKES AREA ® FINA NCIA L SE RVIC ES C ARD Mother’s Day Buffet Sunday, May 8th • 11a.m. to 8p.m. Ham, Turkey & Roast Beef, Beer Cheese Soup, Salad Bar, Desserts & all the trimmings Happy Mother’s Day MOTHER’S DAY BUFFET Mai & Hoa Ngo Adults ~ $8.95 5-9 yrs ~ $6.95 Under 5 ~ $3.00 Washington Square Mall • Detroi t Lakes 847-2177 FROM ALL OF US! FREE Gift for Mom’s! (Limited Quantities) Valid on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8th ONLY. Mother’s Day SPECIALS Your Choice of. .. 705 Hwy 10E, Detroit Lakes 218-847-0472 $799 Kids Eat FREE 1 Free kids meal per adult meal purch ase, not valid with other offers. Eggs Benedict Deli smoked ham and two eggs serv ed atop a toasted english muffi n, sm othered with hollandaise sauce. Served with seasoned hash browns. Crispy Chicken Salad Crispy chicken tenders served over a bed of crisp greens, with tomatoes , cucumbers, your choice of dressing and fl atbread. Add a cup of soup for 99¢. Chicken Alfredo Grilled chicken tossed in alfredo sau ce with broccoli on penne pasta. Topp ed with diced tomatoes, parmesan cheese. S erved with fl atbread. Add a cup of soup or salad for 99 ¢. Grilled Shrimp & Rice Six large shrimp seasoned with garlic butter, served over a bed of rice. Served w ith two side choices. Add a cup of soup or salad for 99 ¢. Mother’s Day 583334 SpecialsSpecials Treat Mom to the Mother’s Da y of her dreams with help from these area bus inesses! Mother’s Day Sunday, May 8 Stop in and sign up for our Mother’s Day drawing! $25 ~ $50 & $100 Gift Certificates to be given away Mother’s Day afternoon, May 8th. *Need not be present to win. Happy away Mother’s Day away Mother’s Day afternoon, May 8th. afternoon, May 8th. afternoon, May 8th. *Need not be present to win. *Need not be present to win. *Need not be present to win. *Need not be present to win. $500 Off Hanging Baskets 1 mile North of Detroit Lakes on Richw ood Road 19165 County Hwy. 21 218-847-7520 HappyHappy OPEN 8am-8pm • 7 Days A Week Stop in and sign up HappyHappy Stop in and sign up HappyHappy Mother’s Day Weeklies up to 1,500–12 entries First Place: Tri-County News, Kimball, Jean Doran Matua Required Reading: 337 School Districts in Minnesota. Where does Kimball stand in funding? Genius use of art to illustrate complex information. Second Place: Portage News, Floodwood, John Grones Section 7A Runner-up! Gorgeous. Pro team design for the local winners! Weeklies 1,501-2,500–13 entries First Place: Renville County Register, Olivia, Adam Hoogenakker & Brooke Eischens Congratulations! Alex Steffel A unique way to congratulate a champion wrestler. Very clean layout and good hierarchy/flow of content. Second Place: Pelican Rapids Press, Jeff Meyer Relax Clear message, not cluttered and a good way to make insurance more appealing. Honorable Mention: Grant County Herald, Elbow Lake, Anne O’Flynn el4u Creative design. Catchy copy. Good message. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–33 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, DL Newspapers Staff Mother’s Day Great resource for Mother’s Day gift giving! A fantastic collaboration by the newspaper’s staff. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Connie Klopka & Luanna Lake Trick or Treat Game What a fantastic Halloween promotion. Great opportunity for advertisers and fun for even your youngest readers. Great design.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 22 Innovative Online Advertising Best Advertisement CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE areas of Hawaii were sent to refuge areas at community centers and schools while tourists in Waikiki were moved to higher floors of their hotels. People waited in long lines stocking up on gas, bottled water, canned food and gen-erators, and officials told residents to stock up on water and fill their cars with gas. The tsunami, spawned by an 8.9-magnitude earthquake in Japan, slammed the eastern coast of Japan, sweeping away boats, cars, homes and people as widespread fires burned out of con-trol. It raced across the Pacific at 500 mph — as fast as a jetliner — and likely won’t change speed until it hits a large area of land, said Kanoa Koyan-agi, a geophysicist for the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center. Waves are predicted to hit the western coast of the United States be-tween 11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. EST Friday. Evacu-ations were ordered in parts of Washington and Oregon, and people near the beach and in low-lying coastal areas in Santa Barbara County, California, were told to move immediately inland to higher ground. It was the second time in a little over a year that Hawaii and the U.S. West coast faced the threat of a massive tsunami. A mag-nitude-8.8 earthquake in Chile spawned warnings on Feb. 27, 2010, but the waves were much smaller than predicted and almost no damage was reported. Scientists acknowl-edged they overstated the threat but defended their actions, saying they took the proper steps and learned the lessons of the 2004 Indonesian tsuna-mi that killed thousands of people who didn’t get enough warning.On Friday, the Hono-lulu International Airport remained open but seven or eight jets bound for Hawaii have turned around, including some originating from Japan, the state Department of Transportation said. All harbors are closed and vessels were be-ing ordered to leave the harbor. Many islands in the Pa-cific evacuated after the warnings were issued, but officials told resi-dents to go home because the waves weren’t as bad as expected. But the size of Hawaii’s islands is expected to amplify the waves, which will crash hardest against harbors and inlets. “They’re going to be coming in with high cur-rents, they can pick up boulders from the sea floor ... they can pick up cars, they can pick up fuel tanks, those things become bat-tering rams and so it just amplifies the destruction in a big tsunami,” said Chip McCreery, director for the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center. Waves almost 5 feet high hit Midway, a tiny island in the North Pacific about 1,300 miles northwest of Honolulu. The warnings issued by the Hawaii-based Pacific Tsunami Warning Center cover an area stretching the entire western coast of the United States and Canada from the Mexican border to Chignik Bay in Alaska. In Alaska, a dozen small communities along the Aleutian Island chain were on alert. A wave just over 5 feet hit one area, but there were no reports of damage. In Oregon, sirens blasted in some coastal communities and at least one hotel was evacuated in the northern part of the state. Officials in two coastal Washington counties used a reverse 911 sys-tem, phoning residents on the coast and in low-lying areas and asking them to move to higher ground. “We certainly don’t want to cry wolf,” said Sheriff Scott Johnson of Washington’s Pacific County. “We just have to hope we’re doing the right thing based on our infor-mation. We don’t want to be wrong and have people hurt or killed. The tsunami warning was issued Friday at 3:31 a.m. EST. Sirens were sounded about 30 min-utes later in Honolulu alerting people in coastal areas to evacuate. About 70 percent of Hawaii’s 1.4 million population resides in Honolulu. Dozens of cities and villages along a 1,300-mile (2,100-ki-lometer) stretch of coastline were shaken by violent tremors that reached as far away as Tokyo, hundreds of miles (kilometers) from the epicenter. “The earthquake has caused major damage in broad areas in northern Japan,” Prime Minister Naoto Kan said at a news conference. The government ordered thousands of residents near a nuclear power plant in Onahama city to evacuate because the plant’s system was unable to cool the reac-tor. The reactor was not leaking radiation but its core remained hot even after a shutdown. The plant is 170 miles (270 kilometers) northeast of Tokyo. Trouble was reported at two other nuclear plants as well, but there was no radiation leak at any. Even for a country used to earthquakes, this one was of horrific proportions because of the tsunami that crashed ashore, swallowing everything in its path as it surged several miles (kilometers) inland before retreating. The apocalyptic images of surging water broadcast by Japanese TV networks resembled scenes from a Hollywood disaster movie. Large fishing boats and other sea vessels rode high waves into the cities, slamming against over-passes or scraping under them and snapping power lines along the way. Upturned and par-tially submerged vehicles were seen bobbing in the water. Ships anchored in ports crashed against each other. The highways to the worst-hit coastal areas were severely damaged and communications, in-cluding telephone lines, were snapped. Train services in northeastern Japan and in Tokyo, which normally serve 10 million people a day, were also suspended, leaving untold numbers stranded in stations or roaming the streets. To-kyo’s Narita airport was closed indefinitely.Jesse Johnson, a native of the U.S. state of Ne-vada, who lives in Chiba, north of Tokyo, was eat-ing at a sushi restaurant with his wife when the quake hit. “At first it didn’t feel unusual, but then it went on and on. So I got myself and my wife under the table,” he told The Associated Press. “I’ve lived in Japan for 10 years and I’ve never felt anything like this before. The aftershocks keep coming. It’s gotten to the point where I don’t know whether it’s me shaking or an earthquake.”Waves of muddy wa-ters flowed over farmland near the city of Sendai, carrying buildings, some on fire, inland as cars attempted to drive away. Sendai airport, north of Tokyo, was inundated with cars, trucks, buses and thick mud deposited over its runways. Fires spread through a section of the city, public broad-caster NHK reported.More than 300 houses were washed away in Ofu-nato City alone. Television footage showed mangled debris, uprooted trees, up-turned cars and shattered timber littering streets.The tsunami roared over embankments, washing anything in its path inland before reversing directions and carrying the cars, homes and other debris out to sea. Flames shot from some of the houses, prob-ably because of burst gas pipes. “Our initial assessment indicates that there has already been enormous damage,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said. “We will make max-imum relief effort based on that assessment.”He said the Defense Ministry was sending troops to the quake-hit region. A utility aircraft and several helicopters were on the way.A large fire erupted at the Cosmo oil refin-ery in Ichihara city in Chiba prefecture and burned out of control with 100-foot (30 meter) -high flames whipping into the sky. From northeastern Japan’s Miyagi prefec-ture, NHK showed foot-age of a large ship being swept away and ramming directly into a breakwater in Kesennuma city.NHK said more than 4 million buildings were without power in Tokyo and its suburbs.Also in Miyagi, a fire broke out in a turbine building of a nuclear power plant, but it was later extinguished, said Tohoku Electric Power Co. the company said.A reactor area of a nearby plant was leak-ing water, the company said. But it was unclear if the leak was caused by tsunami water or some-thing else. There were no reports of radioactive leaks at any of Japan’s nuclear plants. Jefferies International Limited, a global invest-ment banking group, said it estimated overall losses to be about $10 billion. Page 12 • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, March 11, 2011 DJW_3292Fah_St. Patty’s Day/ $5 Weekend _AlbertLeaTribune_4.916”x10”_PRO_Rundate: 3/11 MARCH 17 FREE HOT DOGS 11am-1pm $500 KARAOKE CONTEST* Sign-up begins at 4:30pm | Contest begins at 6pm St. Patty'S DayC E L E B R AT I O N 2011 it’s 3 days of $5 fun!it’s 3 days of $5 fun! $ MARCH 25-27 EntErtainmEnt, Dining, anD morE! 777 DiamonD Jo Lane, northwooD, ia 50459 www.DiamonDJo.Com | 1-877-323-5566 Must be 21 or older. If you or someone you know needs gambling treatment, call 1-800-BETS OFF. YOUR KIND OF PLACE YOUR KIND OF PLACE yOuR kINd Of Place! *Limited to 36 contestants. See Diamond Club for details. See Diamond Club for details. Absolutely BRILLIANT! “ “ ... riveting performance... “ “ ★★★★★!“ “ COMING IN APRILFeaturing hints for summer wardrobe, martini recipes, spice review, family fun calendar, tips for staying fit while pregnant, a column on what men want, 10 quick ideas for romance. Read our featured articles on handling childhood depression and overcoming eating disorders. And, of course, tips for wearing high heels. ALBeRT LeA | AusTIN | OwATONNA Just in time for Spring Earn extra cash on your spring walks. The Albert Lea Tribune has routes in the following neighborhoods available: Bridge Ave/Hills LnBridge Ave/Crystal Dr Harmony Ave Hartland/ManchesterCherry Ave., Johnson St. and Stevens St. Start your route today! Call 507-379-3422 Japan: Dozens of cities shakenContinued from Front Page Hawaii: All harbors are closedContinued from Front Page Weeklies over 5,000–25 entries First Place: Echo Press, Alexandria, Deb Zens, Karla Mikkelson & Izzy Rusch Super Pizza Party Each coupon stands alone as a well-designed piece, but the impact of the whole page is fantastic. Second Place: Echo Press, Alexandria, Nichole Roell & Izzy Rusch Full Service Bike Shop Stunning! All Dailies–67 entries First Place: Albert Lea Tribune, Stacey Bahr Southern Minnesota Venus Clean, visually-stunning ad. Great play on a movie poster. Second Place: The Journal, New Ulm, Becky Wilbrecht & Matt Irwin You’ve Never Seen Bankers Like This Before Appealing design, great use of a fun photo. Definitely illustrates the client’s message. Nice concept. All Weeklies –6 entries First Place: Echo Press, Alexandria, Jenny Wagner & Shelly Beaulieu Karrow Jewelers Love it!!! These ads are speaking directly to the buyer and in a most creative way! Second Place: Echo Press, Alexandria, Nichole Roell & Jody Hanson Steinbring Motorcoach Great use of photos. All Dailies–10 entries First Place: Owatonna People’s Press, Kerri Pohlner & Deb Theisen Reggie’s Brew House Nice design and use of eye-catching colors. The schedule of events is a nice addition - just what people look for when they go online! Second Place: St. Cloud Times, Gary Schlickenmayer Grand Casino Fantastic online ad. Love the rotation of four different images, each with a different attraction for the web user.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 23  Human Interest Story CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  By Lisa Brain ard Chatfield News Stan Fieseler o f Chatfield is retired after 20 years in the military, both i n the Army and in the Air Force . It might not surprise you to learn he’s spen t time recently in a valley ringed with mountain s. You’re thinking a little skiing, perhaps, as par t of some rest and recreation in Colorado, right? Well, no t exactly… Fieseler has be en working as a civilian contr actor with a pri - vate security gr oup at the Bagram Air For ce Base in Afghanistan sin ce October. He returned to the United States for a 15-day bre ak, leaving to return to the M iddle East near - ly immediately after this inter - view in Chatfie ld Feb. 16. The base where Fieseler is located, in the p rovince of Parwan and no rth of the province of Kab ul, has moun- tains around it , while it sits in a desert Bagram Base is a “pro- cessing point” f or U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Troops come th rough there to leave for or retu rn from Forward Opera ting Bases (FOBs) in othe r provinces. According to Fi eseler, thats where most of the real militar y action is. The tr oops are there to stabilize the region and its nomadic Taliba n warlords. Contracting Fieseler said th ere are a “tremendous am ount” of pri- vate contractor s in active mili- tary areas. He f igures there are over 30,000 at the Bagram Airfield. Of tha t number one- third play supp ort roles and ar e civilians. They maintain logis- tics support in numerous area s, as well as many tasks. He noted, for e xample, Oshkosh Truck has around 10 0 contractors at B agram. Trained in the U.S., the y service trucks and are liaison s back to the fa c- tory. “They’re g etting real-time testing in the fi eld,” said Fieseler. As for his work , Fieseler holds an “Esco rt-Monitor” (EM) title and p osition, work- ing in conjunct ion with the Ai r Force. He helps escort both LNs (“local nat ionals”) and TCNs (“third co untry nation- als”) to constru ction sites and then observes a nd guards them while they’re th ere. He makes sure workers don’t do anything wr ong or wander off. The job is o n the flight lines, 100 ft. fro m jets landing. There are six or seven jobsites on the base. “My position is unarmed. We have armed sec urity people with us. A lot o f it is eyes - and ears.” Fieseler said so metimes the civilian contrac tor EMs will catch someone doing some- thing, like mark ing off a grid pattern. If that were not caught, it could provide coordi - nates for rocke ts and mortars from “outside t he wire” - or base - later. He knew about this type job because of his a ssociation with the military. An Army friend in a similar positi on contacted and told him, t o quote a well- known phrase, “We’re looking for a few good men.” Fieseler’s contr act runs out the end of May with an option for a one-year e xtension avail- Stan Fieseler of Chat field wears an Afghan hat and his s ecurity clearance armband. (Chatfield News pho to by Lisa Brainard) Volume 156 – N o. 8 Wednesday, Fe bruary 23, 2011 75 cents By Gretchen Mensink Lov ejoy and Lisa Bra inard Chatfield News An audience of around 50 too k a sentimental journey at the Chatfield Publi c Library the ev ening of Feb. 17 , in honor of th e library’s ninety -sixth birthday . Rhonda Laurie and the Sidewa lk Café band pe rformed tunes to the theme of “H appy Days are H ere Again: Upli fting Songs of t he Greatest Gener ation.” Minnes ota’s Greatest G eneration prog rams are presented b y Minnesota Re gional Public L ibraries in part ner- ship with the M innesota Histor ical Society. Library Directo r Monica Erick son stated after looking throug h program evalua tions from the audience on La urie’s program that just as she susp ected, “Everybo dy loved it.” She continued, “When asked w hat they liked b est about the p ro- gram folks com mented that th ey enjoyed not only the great m usic, but the memor ies it inspired. You could see i t... wistful smil es, toes were tappi ng, bodies sway ing, and eyes w ere looking dre amy. “Others expres sed an apprecia tion for the inte resting Minnes ota history woven t hroughout the program, share d through stori es behind the son gs and the time s that inspired them. It really was a nostalgic walk down memory lane, even for t hose who are n ot of the ‘Greatest G eneration.’ “ Tunes were of t he genre includ ing “Sentiment al Journey,” “Cheek to Chee k,” “I Got Rhyth m,” “Dream a L ittle Dream of M e,” Rhonda Laurie and t he “gypsy jazz” band Sidewalk Café perfo rmed at the Chatfiel d Public Library Feb. 1 7. (Photo submitted to Chatfield News) ‘Greatest Generation ’ recalled at library anniversary That’s a mighty big jump!!! Fillmore County Sheriff’s Office deputies and Sheriff Daryl Jensen again took part in the Law Enforcement Polar Bear Plunge held Feb. 12 at Rochester’s Foster Arend Park. Around 830 plungers raised over $183,000 for Special Olympics. (Photo submitted to Chatfield News) By Gretchen Mensink Lov ejoy Chatfield News There’s a Ph.D. prowling Chat field Elementary Sch ool. He’s on the loo se and literary. “‘Dr. Seuss on t he Loose’ is our theme for I Love to Read Month,” said C hatfield Elementary Sch ool reading spe cialist Judith Brockwa y, anticipating the upcom- ing Seuss on th e Loose Family Fun Day, on the calendar fo r this Sunday a fternoon, Feb. 27. “We decided to join together w ith Community Ed ucation this yea r and pro- vide a family fu n day based on that theme for all Chatfield students in kin dergarten through sixth g rade and their parents. We did a similar fa mily fun evenin g when our theme was ‘Wil d About Readin g’ a few years ago.’ There will be re ading and math games, story reading, c omputer games , a book share, face pain ting and more. It is being held as a rewar d for students w ho read throughout the month so that the elemen- tary could reac h its goal. Ther e will be a visit from the C at in the Hat, so families should be sure to bring their c ameras for photo opportun ities. Brockway — alo ng with Comm unity Education Dire ctor LuAnn Kle van, teach- ers Stacy Baum and Julie Youn g, and Minnesota Rea ding Corps volu nteer Theo Manahan — co llaborated to cr eate activi- ties for Seuss o n the Loose thr oughout the month and for the family fun d ay. “It has been a f un theme. Our fifth and sixth grade stud ents created ou r morning ‘Words of Wisd om’ in Dr. Seus s style and have been shar ing those and s ome great book recomme ndations durin g our morn- ing broadcast. T here have also been Mystery Reade rs coming to th e classrooms and Poetry Bre aks from our th ird grade students. Of co urse, there are always the weekly rewards for meeting ou r reading goal to look for ward to.” Reading during I Love to Read Month earned the stud ents the family fun day, and Brockway is pleased that they were so enthusiastic ab out finishing ye t another book. “I think that th e students enjo y collabo- rating on a com mon goal. It ge ts the whole school involved , and I think th at they enjoy that very much. It is ver y fun and exciting to cele brate with the s tudents on being successfu l with their rea ding goal, and it is also fu n to celebrate r eading and Read up on it - Seuss on the loose at elem entary Chatfield Elementar y School’s Dr. Seuss o n the Loose Family Fun Day is set for this Sunday, Feb. 27, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the elementary school ca feteria. Life in Afghanistan : Fieseler works on ba se as civilian contrac tor At work on the Air Force base in Afghanistan, it’s private contractor Stan Fieseler. From left these phot os are of bazaar goo ds — which include such things as rugs, dishware, hand-hew n wooden bowls, jew elry, hand-painted ceram ics and more; an Afg han shopkeeper at t he bazaar; and an Af ghan truck driver. (Photos submitted to Chatfield News) Fieseler – Continued on page 6 Generation – Contin ued on page 6 Seuss – Continued on page 6 Weeklies up to 1,500–36 entries First Place: Chatfield News, Lisa Brainard Life in Afghanistan: Fieseler works on base as civilian contractor Excellent organization of ideas. Good layout and page design. Second Place: Portage News, Floodwood, Paul Gregersen For the love of the game Well-written and draws the reader’s attention immediately. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–58 entries First Place: Jackson County Pilot, Justin R. Lessman Blood Links Blood Links demonstrated that an appreciation for history and tradition can be infused with humor by letting the subjects relax and speak their minds. This fly on the wall approach to the interview process results in a true sense of the fun of this annual sausage-making event, much more so than the 60 Minutes interviewing style of many of the other entries. Second Place: Grant County Herald, Elbow Lake, Chris Ray Letters to soldier husband ‘works of art’ This story takes the reader back in time to the urgency of World War II, and to the importance of letter writing in our past. The story helps preserve the work of one woman who made a difference in not only her husband’s life, but in all of the military personnel who saw her artwork. Honorable Mention: Delano Herald Journal, Ryan Gueningsman Designing a legend Fascinating profile of your community’s “best kept secret.” Weeklies 2,501-5,000–87 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Brian Wierima Emmanuel’s Best Friend I could imagine her walking the halls and getting on the elevator. Great work. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Brian Basham Roll out the barrel Love how this story flowed. Very interesting. The pictures were great. Honorable Mention: Lake Country Echo, Pequot Lakes, Pete Mohs Man isn’t embarrassed to sit on Pequot Lakes street corner looking for work Very relevant story especially during these hard times.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 24 Human Interest Story CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Weeklies over 5,000–78 entries First Place: Isanti County News, Cambridge, Elizabeth Sias A Miracle for Monster: Easten Engstrom receives heart trans- plant at 5 months old In A Miracle for Monster, Elizabeth Sias does a great job of bringing life to a family’s moments, both in the daily routine of play and the dramatic details of baby Easten’s medical ordeal. The writing is descriptive yet clear and active. The quotes are well chosen for emotional impact, and Sias does not rely on cliches to tell the story. She also is able to fold in the medical information in a way that makes it interesting to read instead of slowing down the flow of the story. Second Place: Southwest Journal, Minneapolis, Nick Halter Honoring plane crash victims Nick Halter’s Honoring plane crash victims is an unexpected and well-told history piece. The details from Diane Doughty Madsen and Floyd Roman about the night more than 60 years ago are vivid and compelling. Halter ties them in well with the modern- day story line of Mark Kaplan’s quest to memorialize the plane crash. An interesting story pulled from a little-known event. Dailies under 10,000–43 entries First Place: Mesabi Daily News, Virginia, Jesse White Unlike any other at the Olsons, they waited for Dad to return from a tow This story surprised me, made me laugh, gave me details unlike the other stories and was a tale well told about something that normally would be considered mundane. Second Place: Hibbing Daily Tribune, Kelly Grinsteinner Angels Must Have Intervened When I read this feature, I said ‘wow’ several times because of the drama of the accidents, the touching quotes and emotion of the story. Honorable Mention: Faribault Daily News, Joseph Lindberg Service before self/Last bastion of men The lede got me from the start. War stories can be mundane, but this one was personal, had great use of quotes and historical information that clearly didn’t come only from the subject. PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE P AID Permit No. 51 Cambridge, MN Wednesday, June 15, 2011 75¢ z Knitting bring s people togethe r at GracePointe Cro ssing p. 3 z Enjoying Brah am Appreciation Day p. 19 z Open Range C owboy Church m oves to Isanti; special ev ent planned Jun e 26 p. 6 What’s Inside Two state medals fo r Cambridge-Isanti High School Track page 10 Hundreds turn out fo r Race the Rum event , Cambridge Day Out pages 2 & 11 isanticountynew s.com Volume 111 Numb er 21 Smartphone Fri endly Q R A pp R eq ui re d Scan Me! Tracked 2D barc ode provides a link directly to our website Elizabeth Sias [email protected] cm-inc.com Derri Engstrom wraps her 10-mo nth-old son Easten in her ar ms, holding him close. His fa- ther Nick and b rother Deven si t nearby, warm smiles on their f aces as they wat ch. When Easten cu rls his mouth in to his infec- tious smile, all t hree beam. “Grrrr!” Easten suddenly exc laims, and 9-year-old Deve n replies with a growl of his own. “His nickname at home is Mon ster,” Derri explains, smiling and laughing wi th her boys. Simple moments such as this on e are some- thing the Engst roms were not accustomed to for the first six months of Eas ten’s life. Born Aug. 10 with a heart defect, Easten had no choice but to u ndergo open he art surgery at just six days old . With a conditio n known as hyp oplastic left heart syndrome , the left side of Easten’s heart was underdevel oped. Only the right side was pumping blood. “He essentially had just half a h eart,” Derri said. ‘He almost died in my arms’ It was 20 weeks into her pregn ancy when an ultrasound technician noti ced something wrong with the b aby’s heart and asked Derri to return for a leve l two ultrasound . That’s when do ctors discovere d Easten’s heart defect and told the Engstr oms he would have to undergo surgery. “The doctor lef t to look at eve rything and when she came back, she told Nick and I that from one out of ten, with ten b eing the worst, that this was a t en — this heart condition was one of the wor st heart conditi ons you could have,” Derri said . “We were deva stated.” Doctors told th e family their b aby would have to undergo three surgeries : one between three to six days old, one at three to six months and another at a year-and-a-half. During Easten’s first surgery a t Children’s Hospital in Minn eapolis, doctors placed a shunt in his heart to h elp circulate blo od. After three weeks in the ho spital, the Engst roms, exhaust- ed but relieved , were able to b ring their son back home to W yanett Townshi p for the first time for what th ey thought woul d be months. Eric Hagen Anoka County U nion Over 2,500 m otorcyclists w ill be roaring thro ugh communiti es in northern Anoka County and sou thern Isanti County o n Saturday, Jun e 18 to provide a vis ual show of sup port for the people t hat served or ar e still serving in the m ilitary. The Patriot Ride brings out moto r- cyclists and obs ervers, some wh o are veterans themse lves and others who just want to sho w their support . For the second year in a row, the ev ent’s home base is H am Lake Lions Park, which is located on the south si de of 157th Avenue an d not too far we st of Hwy. 65. The deadline t o pre-register f or the event is J une 16. Visit h ttp:// thepatriotride.o rg to pre-registe r. The cost is $25 per r ider and $10 per pas- senger. You can register the day of the event, but the c ost increases to $35 per rider. The registration period, regardle ss if you pre-regis tered or not, b egins at 9 a.m. June 1 8. The ride begi ns at noon. Doug Bley, a M innesota Patrio t Guard board m ember, encoura ged members of the community to a ttend this event to su pport the riders and troops. Besides the ride itself, there will be morning and afternoon cer- emonies and an evening dance fea- turing the classi c rock band The Wild Hogs. A display of World War I I and Vietnam era mi litary equipmen t will be on display. N ew this year is a n ob- stacle course se t up by the Minn esota National Guard. There is no cha rge to attend th e event unless y ou are riding, Bley pointed out. Including the rid ers and observe rs, there have been over 5,000 peop le at Free summer day camp provides fun, safe environment for kids Elizabeth Sias [email protected] cm-inc.com Kids in the C ambridge community will be able to swim, fish, kaya k, play sports and board g ames, make crafts, listen t o music, go horseback ridin g and go for a pontoon ride all in one af- ternoon this su mmer. And it won’t cost a pen ny. A group of c ommunity members are h osting a free community da y camp for children to be held on Lake Fannie for eight sessions this summer. The camp, calle d Kids at the Beach Outre ach (KABO), started last y ear after a simple idea b ecame real- ity. A group of people who meet once a wee k to pray for Cambridge sta rted talking about what the y did during the summer wh en they were kids. One organizer, K itty Ship- shock, mention ed how she used to hop on her bike and go to the creek for a swim and realized t here are no longer many ine xpensive op- tions for summ er activities. She then said her church, Chadashchay M inistry (Lake- side Church), has a beach and a playgrou nd and won- dered if they c ould open it up for kids. One thing led to another, and s oon enough, kids were laugh ing and play- ing in a safe env ironment free of charge. “It was one of those off- the-top-of-your-h ead things and we thought we would for- get it, but nobo dy forgot it,” Construction beg an on the 2nd Av e. SW bridge project in Cambr idge this week. M otorists will now be detoured to Hwy. 95. The project is ex- pected to be com pleted by the end of October. Residents can sti ll continue to pa rk along 2nd Ave. SW and use the city park fac ilities. Motorists will al so encounter a road clo- sure at the Burli ngton Northern S anta Fe rail- road tracks on H wy. 95 in Cambri dge on Tues- day, June 21, for a track repair p roject. Work will begin at 8 a .m. and should b e completed by 4 p.m., weath er permitting. Photos by Rache l Kytonen Easten Engstrom receives heart transplant at 5 months old Over 2,500 to ri de for the men and women of t he military Work begins on 2nd Ave. SW bridge project Fun in the Sun See MIRACLE on p age 5 See RIDE on page 5 See CAMP on pag e 5 Derri and Easten smile and laugh together. Derri s tays at home wit h her son to mon itor his vitals, track his weight and administer h is medicine seve ral times a day, watching for any signs of his body rejecting th e new heart. Photo by Elizabe th Sias June 18 ride incl udes a resting stop in Ca mbridge The sixth annua l Patriot Ride will include a sto p at the Cambridge Arme d Forces Reserve and Com munity Center on June 1 8. NEWS File photo Children enjoy s wimming at Lak e Fannie last sum mer as part of a new free summ er day camp call ed Kids at the Be ach. The camp will run this sum mer on Tuesday s and Wednesda ys from July 12 to Aug. 3. Photo submitted
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 25  Social Issues Story CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  by Sue Austreng Staff Writer With determined eyes fixed on a rocky financial horizon, Anoka- Hennepin School Board members unanimously approved $3.2 million in budget cuts for the 2011-2012 school year. That action, during the board’s reg- ular Jan. 24 meeting, was taken when board members adopted the $408.5 million budget for fiscal year 2012 – a budget drafted on the assumption that District 11 would receive no more and no less in state educational funding than it received last year. Superintendent Dennis Carlson, expressing disappointment in Minnesota’s failure to adequately fund education, said, “The state Legislature needs to get a job done and fund education. “This board has been fis- cally responsible. I would argue that the state needs to be fiscally responsible, too.” Anoka-Hennepin’s budget cuts will not affect teachers or pro- grams, but will affect outside-the- classroom services and activities: • Business services will be cut $75,000 – $45,000 of that result- ing from the district’s decision to implement paperless payroll. The other $30,000 comes from supply reductions and outsourcing. YOUR WEEKLY COMMUNITY NEWS SOURC E FOR 48 YEARS A SECTION Phone: 763.421.4444 Fax: 763.421.4315 www.blaine-slplife.com CIRCULATION C O U N C I L VERIFICATION FRIDAY JAN. 28, 2011 Vol. 48/No. 40 3 sections/32 pages $1.00 © 2011 ECM Publishers, Inc. Quote for Life Smartphone Friendly Q R A pp R eq ui re d Scan Me! Tracked 2D barcode provides a link directly to our website ���������� �� ��� ������ ������ ����� ��� �� ����������� ���� �� ��� ���������� ��������������� ���� �������� ������� ������ � ��� ���� � ������� � ���� ������� � ������ ��� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � ��� � ��� � ���� by Elyse Kaner Staff Writer Two teachers from Spring Lake Park High School are in the running for 2011 Minnesota Teacher of the Year. The SLP teachers who have accepted the nomi- nation and completed the application process are Brook Magid Hart, guid- ance counselor for the class of 2014 (now ninth-grad- ers), and ninth grade math teacher Lori Thompson. They will vie for the top spot among 106 other teach- ers from throughout the state. The Teacher of the Year Program, orga- nized and underwritten by Education Minnesota, celebrates the tradition of excellence in education. Magid Hart is in her 11th year as a counselor at the high school. In her 16th year in educa- tion, she worked for one year in the Minneapolis Public School system and in the Ashland (Wisconsin) School District from 1995-1999. Last year at her urging, nearly 95 percent of the SLPHS graduating class, a record number, applied for college, an institute of high- er learning or the military. Thompson was named 2010 SLP District 16 Teacher of the Year - sec- ondary level, sponsored by Spring Lake Park Teachers United. Thompson is SLPHS girls’ basketball coach and in her fifth year of teaching at SLP. She has taught since 1998 in Minnesota school districts, including Detroit Lakes high and middle schools and Cherry and Greenway high schools. The Teacher of the Year will be announced May 1 at Northland Inn in Brooklyn Park. A team of 23 communi- ty leaders are reviewing the 108 candidate applications and in the next few weeks will name semifinalists fol- lowed by finalists. Education Minnesota represents 70,000 teach- ers, educational support professionals in Minnesota public school districts, state community and technology colleges and the University of Minnesota campuses in Duluth and Crookston. It also represents retired edu- cators and student teachers. The organization is affili- ated with the American Federation of Teachers, National Education Association and AFL-CIO. This marks the 47th annual Teacher of the Year Program. Elyse Kaner is at elyse. k a n e r @ e c m - i n c . c o m District 11 cuts $3.2 million ‘District 11’ continued on Page 8A Teachers, programs spared in latest bud get trimming effort by Elyse Kaner Staff Writer Ah, the joy and perils of raising a child. Scott Kranz’s students know them well. Kids file into class fuss- ing over their babies. One student swaddles hers in a teal baby bunting. She props a yellow cap – com- plete with pom-pom – atop its head. She lifts it ador- ingly. Others ignore theirs. They look forward to final- ly untethering them – giving them the boot. “All right, let’s get the babies out,” Kranz yells to his students. He checks over each and every one carefully. A dog ate mine, says one student, showing her flour baby, all wrapped in plastic. It is the last day of an exper- iment Kranz has assigned for more than 10 years in his advanced placement psychol- ogy classes at Spring Lake Park High School. Advance placement psychology teac her Scott Kranz at Spring Lake Park High School checks over a flour baby as part of a student assignment teaching dev elopment and some serious duties of parenting. (Photo by Elyse Kaner) by Elyse Kaner Staff Writer Spring Lake Park School District 16 will host its first- ever information and enroll- ment evening next month. The event will take place Wednesday, Feb. 9. Stop by the District Services and Welcome Center anytime between 6:30 and 8 p.m. The center is located at 1415 81st Ave. N.E., Spring Lake Park. If you are considering enrolling your child in school and want to learn more about the district, this is your oppor- tunity to visit with school principals, Superintendent Jeff Ronneberg and program representatives. The district’s vision for the future is to be recog- nized as a world-class learn- ing community of choice aligned around improving student learning. District schools include: Northpoint Elementary (K-3), Blaine; Park Terrace Elementary (K-3), Spring Lake Park; Woodcrest Elementary (K-3), Fridley; Westwood Intermediate School (4-5); Westwood Middle School (6-8); Spring Lake Park High School (9-12) and the Learning Alternatives Community School. The SLP School District serves 5,000 students from the cities of Blaine, Spring Lake Park and Fridley. Among its innovative programs are personal- ized learning, technology- rich learning and teaching, half- and full-day Spanish Immersion kindergar- ten, Spanish Immersion Program at Westwood for kindergartners through second-graders and Spanish preschool. The district offers programs for the gift- ed and talented, online learning opportunities, Opportunities in Emergency Care, early childhood, ath- letics and other activities, such as music, dance line and theater. If parents wish to enroll their child, they may do so at this evening event. If you’d like a school tour, sign up for a spot for Tuesday, Feb. 15. or Thursday, Feb. 17. Call 763-786-5570 for more information Elyse Kaner is at elyse. k a n e r @ e c m - i n c . c o m District 16 will host enrollment, information event Students use ‘flour power’ to learn about parenting ‘Parenting’ continued on Page 8A District 16 staffers vie for Teacher of Ye ar Lori Thompson Magid Hart The Teacher of the Year Program, organized and underwritten by Education Minnesota, celebrates the tradition of excellence in education.The Teacher of the Year will be announced May 1 at Northland Inn in Brooklyn Park. AT A GLANCE Education is the best provision for old age. -Aristotle Blaine resident has unique TwinsFest perspective Blaine resident Mark Genosky is pleased TwinsFest 2011 is rolling into town, even though he won’t be helping fans live out their baseball broadcast fantasies. Genosky is a 1989 Blaine High School graduate. He’s been employed by the Minnesota Twins since 2007 and is the team’s game-day producer for radio broadcasts. When TwinsFest is held at the Metrodome, Genosky is responsible for running a booth where fans don a headset and microphone and do radio play-by-play. “That’s been taken off the table this year [in Blaine] because the event has been downsized,” Genosky said. “Basically, we cut an audio CD of a fan calling plays from a 10- or 12-play highlight package from the previous season. They have a chance to be John Gordon or Dan Gladden and call the radio play-by-play.” After graduating from BHS, Genosky attended college at Gustavus Adolphus in St. Peter. “I really wasn’t sure what my focus was going to be, and after some unique experi- ences and opportunities, I set- tled into the communications world, and actually carved out a niche with a broadcasting emphasis,” he said. For more about Genosky and TwinsFest, see Page 2A. Anoka County unveils highway plan Anoka County has unveiled its five-year highway improve- ment plan for 2011-2015. While 2011 highway proj- ects included in the plan have been approved by the Anoka County Board as part of its 2011 budget, improvements proposed for years 2012 through 2015 are for planning purposes only and have yet to receive an official stamp of approval from the board. For more about the high- way plan, see Page 3A. Dailies 10,000 and over–64 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Mila Koumpilova Struggling to succeed The lede hooked me right away: Specific, evocative and illustrative of the problems that this immigrant community is facing. Really interesting package that suggests the reporter spent a lot of time thinking about her subjects AND her readers. Well done. Second Place: Duluth News Tribune, Jana Hollingsworth For generations, Duluthians have come together at Central Really thoughtful storytelling about the history of Duluth’s Central High School and—in particular—what it means for a community to have a single secondary school. A well-organized story and a fine piece of community journalism. Weeklies up to 1,500–13 entries First Place: Blaine-Spring Lake Park Life, Elyse Kaner Students use flour power to learn about parenting Like the story of a teacher’s unconventional way to get students to learn about parenting. Second Place: Lake Region Life, Waterville, Lisa Ingebrand Participate, but you can’t score for team on wheels Compelling story of a girl’s desire to compete. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–22 entries First Place: Houston County News, La Crescent, Ryan Henry Is K2 a problem in La Crescent? This entry fulfilled the criteria for the category the best. One of its strengths was using a variety of sources to cover the issue from several perspectives, especially the mother’s story. It alerts parents and others to a potential problem of which they may not be aware. The writing was straight-forward and understandable. Second Place: Renville County Register, Olivia, Shelby Lindrud Area schools united against bullies The entry covered an issue that is extremely relevant today. The administrators and law-enforcement officers provided a thorough overview of the issue and how they’re dealing with it. Thursday, September 9, 2010 Serving the greater La Crescent, Hokah and Dakota, Minn., area $1 Inside the News Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2AChurch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4APeople . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5ALocal news . . . 6-8A, 4B, 8B Volume 129, No. 36 Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6ACountry living . . . . . . . . 1B Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3BPolice report . . . . . . . . . 4B Courthouse report . . . . 4BMeetings . . . . . . . . . . . . 5B Public notices . . . . . . . . 6B Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7B ‘Pennies’ opens this weekendsee page 8A Scholze wins big at fair see page 1B Boys & Girls Club reopened By AUTUMN GROOMSLee Newspapers The La Crescent Boys &Girls Club site re-openedTuesday after being shut downfor 15 months due to lack offunds. Three years of funding havebeen secured for the La Cres-cent club, and the organizationwill continue to develop adonor base to sustain the site,said Mike Desmond, executivedirector of the Boys & GirlsClubs of Greater La Crosse. Heestimated the organizationwill need $150,000 a year tooperate the La Crescent site,520 S. 14th St. “We are extremely thankfulto these people in the La Cres-cent community who steppedup and saw the need andopportunity that the club pro-vides,” Desmond said.The site will be open from 3 to 6 p.m. daily and will col-laborate with the La Crescent-Hokah School District on pro-gramming. School officials say thecommunity needs more after-school programs, primarily formiddle school youth, Des-mond said. The La Crescent site wasclosed in June 2009 aftertough economic times reducedgrants, endowments andfunding from an outsideagency. Officials originallyplanned to reopen the club forthe 2009-10 school year buthad to wait until funds couldbe secured. The La Crescent club hadaveraged 20 to 25 kids a day,and continued to offer athlet-ics while the site was closed. Volunteers make St. Peter’s projects happenNew playground highlights improvementsBy CRAIG MOORHEADFor the Houston County News St. Peter’s Catholic Churchand School in Hokah has a freshlook this year. A new playgroundand sidewalk were constructedover the summer at the urging ofthe school’s insurance carrier.“We pretty much tore every- thing up and started fromscratch,” School Board PresidentRon Petersen said. “It wasn’treally a state or federal mandateor anything. It was more from aliability insurance standpoint.He (the school’s insurance repre-sentative) said our choice was toeither replace the playgroundsurface and the equipment or take the equipment out. It’s kindof hard to have a playgroundwithout any equipment on it.”Principal Rachel Fishel said inan e-mail to Petersen that “theupdates have totally changed theappearance of our school. We’vereceived many complimentsfrom community members. Also,we have several new familiesenrolled this year. I can onlyassume that the improvementshave played some role in that interest. It’s a huge asset to all ofHokah.” The updates include severalnew retaining walls and someextensive landscaping. Thatallowed the playground surfaceto be leveled and topped with alayer of wood chips. New play-ground equipment was pur-chased because some of the olderitems were no longer consideredsafe. The safety of children andpedestrians is the reason for both projects. “It all started with theresearch,” Petersen said. “Wesent out a letter of explanationon why we needed to do this,what it’s going to cost and thehelp we’d need. We just told peo-ple, ‘Let’s get it done.’“The school board put out acall for volunteers. Really, therewere two projects. They werekind of separate, but they were Playground see Page 6A KELLEY MCCALL/ASSOCIATED PRESS Local officials say they’ve seen the use of K2, a synthetic cannabinoid that mimics the effects of marijuana, increase in recent months. At this point, the substance is legal, but it’s banned in other countries and individual states, and some cities have even passed ordinances to eliminate the sale of it. Is K2 a problem in La Crescent? Local officials say they’re seeing a disturbing trend emerging: the use of legal synthetic marijuana known as K2. They urge parents to become aware. By RYAN HENRY Houston County News She had heard about K2 butknew nothing of it. She reallywasn’t concerned until it wasbrought to her attention. Thenshe started reading up on it. Themore she learned, the more sherealized K2 wasn’t something totake lightly. Then one day, she found outher child was invited to a partywhere K2 would be present.“Through a series of textmessages, it was clear to me thisgroup of kids ... is not the groupyou would stereotypicallythink,” said the concerned par-ent, who spoke on the conditionof anonymity. “The one boy told my (child) all about it: You’rehigh for two hours, you need tohave someone watching you(while) you’re hallucinating,how to get the odor off and whoelse might be there that night.”Her child didn’t go.Though not mainstream, theuse of K2 is rising and, accord-ing to the parent, it’s becomingan issue in La Crescent.K2 — also known by “Spice,”“Genie,” “Zohai” and otherpseudonyms — is a substancemany compare to marijuana. It’smarketed as incense but can besmoked like marijuana, causingthe user to get high. But one glaring differenceexists: K2 is legal, and lawenforcement has virtually no recourse in policing it.K2 is a blend of herbs andspices that’s sprayed with syn-thetic cannabinoids, whichmimic the effects of cannabis.When ingested, it can causeincreased agitation, soaringheart rates, paranoia, elevatedblood pressure, vomiting and, inextreme cases, death. It can be15 times more powerful thanmarijuana, though little else isknown about its long-termeffects, according to the gover-nor’s office. But all one needs to know canbe summed by the case of DavidRozga, an Indianola, Iowa, teenwho, just days after his high K2 see Page 3A Funny-looking fish are no laughing matterAquarium releases of exotic fish like pacu and Asian carp pose risk to our areaBy CRAIG MOORHEADFor the Houston County News When Jake Nelson went out July18 on the fishing float below Lockand Dam No. 7, he got a surprise.“I was fishing on the bottom forsunfish,” he recalled. “I had on aplain hook, red worm and a sinker.”Jake got a bite, but the fish didn’tfight well. “I thought it was just asheepshead. I reeled it right off the bottom.” What came out of the riverlooked a little like a piranha butwithout the pointed teeth. “It hadteeth that looked almost like ahuman’s,” Jake said. “The bottom teeth looked likeour back molars.” Jake’s dad turned to Fred Meyer,retired director of a U.S. Fish andWildlife Service fisheries lab.“(He) came to my house with apail, asking if I knew what it was. I took a look and told him, ‘It’s apacu,’” Meyer recalled.Pacu hail from the Amazon andare becoming popular as aquariumfish. As a tropical species, theyaren’t supposed to be able to survivein the upper Mississippi. However,the owner of the fishing float toldJake the fish he caught was thefourth one of that type he has seenthis year. Pacu see Page 3A SUBMITTED PHOTO This is the pacu La Crescent teen Jake Nelson caught while fish- ing the Mississippi River. The invasive species is an Amazon native that is becoming a popular aquarium fish. With funding in place, club ready for school
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 26 Social Issues Story CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Weeklies 2,501-5,000–48 entries First Place: Chaska Herald, Mark W. Olson The grave matter of John Goetz A great read that turned what could have been a simple event story into a look at a community’s changing perceptions. Exactly what social issues reporting should be. Second Place: Waseca County News, Ruth Ann Hager Unsolved Murders Most papers would have been satisfied doing any part of this story (event preview, interview, live coverage). Kudos for taking the time to use all three to put these unsolved murders back into the spotlight and to dig deeper into the issues they raised. Weeklies over 5,000–32 entries First Place: Chanhassen Villager, Unsie Zuege Seeking liberty and justice for all Compelling, candid, personal story relayed succinctly and effectively. Funny, appropriate lead, and great quotes, humor and heartfelt sentiments that cover a range of emotions throughout. The writer’s handling of the subject matter is appropriate, and the story itself covers several social issues within the scope of one. Great work. Second Place: Robbinsdale/Crystal/New Hope/Golden Valley Sun Post, Susan Webber Homelessness touches the suburbs Sound reporting and thorough look at a challenging social issue. Where most other entries focused on the problem, this entry went the extra step of providing ways that people can help to do something about it. Effective anecdotal lead and quotes, as well. Page 2/ Chaska Herald /Thursday, O ctober 28, 2010 Laura’s priorities are YOUR priorities: Growing small busine ss and creating jobs Improving the econom y Investing in our stude nts and schools Fighting for fair and e quitable taxes Prepared & paid fo r by the Helmer Vo lunteer Committee , 8596 Drake Cour t, Chanhassen, MN 55317. AN HONEST, OPEN LEADER FOR OUR COMMUNITY Vote for Laura Helm er November 2 ww w.LauraHelmer.org 20 57 53 ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT Free workshop reveals ways to slash college costs. CHASKA, MN— If y ou’re the parent of a high s chool student who’s plannin g on attending a four-year state college or private unive rsity, you must attend one of these popular FREE worksho ps. The workshop will foc us on little-known ways of g etting money for college, no m atter how much income you m ake, or how good of a studen t you have. The class will in clude such topics as how to inc rease your eligibility for free grant money, and the single bi ggest mistake that 9 out o f 10 parents make when pla nning for college. The workshop date is Sa t. Oct. 30, from 9:30 am to 11 am in the Dry Craft Room at C haska Community Center. 1661 Park Ridge Dr., Chaska. The workshop is being taught by College Pla nning Specialists, Inc (CPS ). A leading expert on he lping families prepare and pa y for college. For over nin eteen years CPS has been he lping families pay for co llege without changing their lifestyle or going broke. Seating is free, but li mited by the size of the room . To reserve your seat, please e mail: [email protected] et 22 14 80 The grave matter of John Goetz PHOTO BY MARK W. OLS ON Civil War vetera n John Goetz is b uried off to the s ide of the Guard ian Angels Catho lic Cemetery. Grave blessing What: Consecration of the grave of suicide v ictim and Civil War veteran John Goetz, w ith American Legion H onor Guard Where: Guardian Ange ls Cemetery, on the no rth side of County Road 40, about a mile west of Chaska Boule vard. When: After the 10 a.m . mass at Guardian An gels Catholic Church Suicide Warning Signs Observable signs of s erious depression: Un relenting low mood; pessimism; hopelessn ess; desperation; anxi ety; psychic pain and inner tension; withdraw al; sleep problems. Increased alcohol and /or other drug use Recent impulsiveness and taking unnecessa ry risks Threatening suicide o r expressing a strong wish to die Making a plan: Giving away prized possessi ons; Sudden or impulsive purchase o f a fi rearm; Obtaining other means of killin g oneself such as poiso ns or medications Unexpected rage or a nger Source: American Fou ndation for Suicide Pre vention Suicide crisis? Call 1- 800-273-8255 More information: afs p.org or save.org Church hopes Sunday blessing sheds light on diffi cult subject By Mark W. Olson On a Friday morn ing, Lake- town Township f armer John Goetz woke about 6 a.m., built a fi re and put the c offee on the stove. Then he wa lked outside into the barn, clim bed into the loft and hung hims elf. The Nov. 6, 1884 H erald re- ported that the m arried Civil War veteran, fath er of three children and two s tepchildren, “was comfortably fi xed fi nan- cially and had no family trou- bles, and must ha ve taken the fi nal step while lab oring under a fi t of temporary insanity.” Goetz, 51, was bu ried two days later. The Her ald reported that “a very large funeral pro- cession followed hi s remains to its last resting plac e.” What wasn’t repo rted was the location of Go etz’s resting place. One-hundred and t wenty-six years later, Guard ian Angels Catholic Cemetery is still lov- ingly kept up, with generation after generation of parishioner buried neatly side by side. That is, except for John Go- etz. Goetz’s grave is a sto ne’s throw from his parish and family, down a ravine, in a sm all clearing amidst tangles of b rush. Because Goetz was a suicide victim, he wasn’ t buried on consecrated groun d. Consecration Public understa nding of mental illnesses, such as de- pression, has com e a long way since the reported “temporary insanity” of Goetz . Perceptions in th e church have also chang ed over the years. “When it ha d been con- sidered an absolut e moral evil, it was thought to be the worst possible mortal si n one could commit,” stated, t he Rev. Paul Jarvis, in a Guar dian Angels newsletter. “Suc h so-called sinners would b e deprived the privilege of b urial within consecrated ground – where dis- ciples were sleepi ng, awaiting the general resurr ection. This prohibition was b y no means confi ned to Cathol ic Christian practice. This was both a com- mon attitude and p ractice.” When Jarvis, Gua rdian An- gels pastor for thre e years, was familiarizing hims elf with the cemetery, he saw a path that went off into the hollow. “I followed it and fo und there’s a lone tombstone there, and I asked about it an d, really no- body knew anythi ng about it,” Jarvis said. Even the name on the worn white st one was dif- fi cult to decipher. With help from pa rishioner and genealogist De bbie Boe, he learned Goetz was a suicide vic- tim – the reason for his unusual gravesite. “I know now this sounds a little unusual, but g iven that he was buried off of consecrated grounds … separa te from his family and his ch urch family, I thought that per haps there’s a way we could br ing him into the cemetery. But t hat would be impractical 126 yea rs later, so I thought the next be st thing is to bring the cemetery to him.” So this Sunday, aft er Guard- ian Angels’ 10 a.m. mass, Jarvis will consecrate th e unconse- crated grounds w here Goetz is buried. There will be an American Legion P ost 57 Honor Guard at the eve nt. The cer- emony is being hel d on the day Goetz died. It is als o the Sunday closest to Nov. 2, A ll Souls Day, a “day in which w e remember and honor deceas ed relatives and friends and oth er disciples of Christ,” Jarvis said. “Not only could w e do right of a Civil War ve teran and a loving father by c onsecrating the ground by wh ich he lies, but also highlight , for a large number of people t oday what is a much misunders tood mental health issue,” Jarv is said. Turnabout Among those plann ing to at- tend the blessing of the grave are Goetz’s relative s, including Sue and Lyle Goetz , of Waconia, and Joyce Schmidt of Glencoe. John Goetz is Lyle and Joyce’s great-grandfather. Sue recalls visiting the grave with her mother-i n-law, years ago. The area was overgrown and the grave was h ard to spot. “In our times ri ght now, especially when t here’s been so many young peo ple commit- ting suicide ... this is the right time,” Sue Goetz said of the blessing. “God lov es everyone the same, and it d oesn’t make any difference.” As a little girl, S chmidt’s father would take h er for a ride past the cemetery , telling her, “That’s where gr eat grandpa was buried.” He ex plained that he had taken his ow n life, which was why he was outside the cemetery. “I think it’s won derful,” Schmidt said, of t he blessing. “I think we should have done it a long time ago.” Prevention Others who plan to attend the blessing are A l and Mary Kluesner, suicide prevention advocates, who h ad two chil- dren die from suic ide. The Rev. Paul Jarvis met th e Kluesners while at a previou s parish as- signment. The Kluesners’ daughter Amy, 21, died of su icide in 1985 while a student a t Iowa State University. “It wa s the shock of our life,” All rec alled. “When you get caught with a suicide in your life, you’re to tally demol- ished,” Kluesner s aid. “I was wondering , ‘Would God let her in heav en,’ because of my Catholic ba ckground. I was so preoccupied with that, it stopped me from d oing stuff.” When Kluesner wa s a child, church attitudes regarding suicide were still entrenched, Kluesner recalled . “They did exactly what was going on in 1884 in Chaska. Th ey wouldn’t bury them in the c emetery.” The Kluesner’s so n George suffered from bipo lar disorder, and died of suic ide in 1997. (Kluesner prefer s the term “suicided.” “You co mmit crime and you commit si n. When you say ‘Commit suic ide’ you’re already stigmatizin g everyone.” Kluesner said.) Pastoral Care Mini stry Coor- dinator Jean Rief s ees parishio- ners struggle with suicide. “Be present to listen. Le t them know they’re not alone,” Rief said, of both those struggl ing with de- pression, and those with a lived one who died of su icide. “I think it’s healin g – heal- ing for anyone w ho suffers,” Rief said of the gr ave blessing. “Suicide is a dise ase and can affect anyone.” Gridlo ck Bus ters! “Call on us to bring re al, non-partisan, solut ions to the challenges facin g our state.” Tom Horner For Governor www.horner2010.c om Tim Biros For State Senate www.timbiros.org Prepared and Paid for by the Committee To Elect Tim Biros, 1075 0 County Road 135, N orwood Young Americ a MN 55397 We do not accept mon ey from PACs or other special interest groups and can alway s act in your best interest! 22 06 25 184232 Century WINE & SPIRITS 952-401-9463 • www.ce nturywine.net Century WINE & SPIRITS P ow er s B lv d. Highway 5 C en tu ry B lv d. H w y. 4 1 N . FREE WINE TASTING* Come check out our wine shop! *Must be 21 years or older to attend CENTURY WINE OUTLET–WHERE WINE IS ALWAYS ON SALE! Great service, great selection and closer than you think. Thursday, November 11 from 4 to 7 Page 24 — Chanhassen Villager — Thursday, October 7, 2010 GALLERYThree Qs Heidi Gould Heidi Gould’s first news-letter for the Carver County Historical Society (CCHS) gave a shout out to the museum’s many volunteers. “Volunteers make our world go round here at the Carver County Histori-cal Society!” Gould wrote. She recently joined the CCHS as its education/volunteer coor-dinator. “Without your support we would never be able to accom-plish as many projects and goals as we do each year,” she added. “Thank you for your dedication and support, no matter in what area —garden-ing, quilt-making, exhibits, or in the library!” Volunteers from throughout the county are encouraged to help with the “Journey Stories” exhibit at the museum, from Dec. 11, 2010, to Jan. 22, 2011. Volunteers are needed daily to staff the “Journey” gallery during museum hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Journey Stories” shows and tells how our ancestors came to America, from Native Americans to our most recent and newest American citizens. In short, it’s a transportation story combining our need to move and build new lives, and transportation technology. The story focuses on immigration, migration, innovation and freedom. “Journey Stories” is part of the Smithsonian Institute’s Traveling Exhibition Service program, Museum on Main Street, which combines the talents of the Smithsonian and rural museums. According to its Web site, www.museumon-mainstreet.org, “One-fi fth of all Americans live in rural areas and one-half of all U.S. museums are located in small, rural towns. Though rural mu-seums demonstrate uncanny enthusiasm for local heritage, they have the fewest opportuni-ties for funding or technical assistance of any segment in the museum field. Museum on Main Street provides these museums access to otherwise scarce resources and assists them in making lasting im-provements that advance their institution’s ambitions.”Gould most recently worked at the Science Museum of Minnesota and the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, and interned with the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis and the Eiteljorg Museum of Amer-ican Indians and Western Art. She has an undergraduate degree in Anthropology and a Master’s in Museum Studies.Q: How did you happen to become interested in his-tory? A: I wouldn’t say it was neces-sarily history that I was interest-ed in, but in museums and muse-um education. I like the informal way of learning, of getting kids attention, making learning fun, giving kids a chance to have the “Aha” or “Wow, I get this” mo-ment, where they just can’t wait to learn more, and want to make learning a lifelong habit. The his-tory I enjoy the most is Ancient Greek, Roman and Celtic history, the Elizabethan and Victorian eras, and the French Revolution, American pioneer times, and ancient Egypt. Q: If you could live in a period of history other than the 21st century, what time period would it be, where, and why? A: Fashion wise, I would choose the 1930s and 1940s. Specif-ic time period, I would probably choose ancient Rome or Greece, because as a woman, in those two time periods, women had a surprising number of jobs and rights available to them.Q: Any insights in how to get young people interested in history? A: Make it fun. Focus on the big events, but make it personal, as through the eyes of a child their age who lived through that event. Make it hands on. The senses make things real for us. For a child to be able to touch, feel, smell, etc, a little piece of history, makes it all the more alive and real for them.For more information about the “Journey Stories” exhibit, and/or to volunteer, contact Gould at [email protected], or call (952) 442-4234. — Unsie Zuege Seeking liberty and justice for allChanhassen couple advocate for tolerance, equity, understanding for all gay Americans PHOTO BY UNSIE ZUEGE After building successful careers in nursing home management and health care, same- gender partners Jane Weiss and Bonnie Zahn see their next life stage devoted to spreading the message of tolerance and respect for gay youth, and equity for same-sex relationships. “You and No Other” Authors: Jane Weiss and Bonnie Zahn Style: Memoir, 223 pagesPublisher: North Star Press of St. Cloud Availability: www.amazon.com and www.northstarpress.comInformation: www.YouandNoOther.com. Editor’s note: In recent weeks, there have been several news reports of teen suicides across the country, including a teen boy from the Twin Cities. The most high profi le suicide reported is that of 18-year-old Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi. He jumped off the George Washington Bridge near his college campus in New Jersey on Sept. 22, after learning his roommate had videotaped him having sex with another male in their col-lege dorm room, then uploaded it to the Internet. Clementi’s suicide further underscores the mission that Chanhassen residents Jane Weiss and Bonnie Zahn have set in motion, to be a resource and support to gay youth. By Unsie Zuege “How can I be gay?” Bonnie Zahn thought. “I’m homopho-bic!” In 1980, Zahn and Jane Weiss were living traditional lives of wives, mothers, and working professionals, juggling their careers with home and fam-ily. But within a year and a half, their worlds changed and they began a journey together, fi lled with both deep love and painful family divisions and rejection. Their memoir “You and No Other,” was just published by Northstar Press of St. Cloud. Weiss and Zahn, longtime Chanhassen residents, have written the story of their 30 years together, describing the joy of fi nding each other, and the despair and pain they experienced in the early years of their relationship.Today, the women have reconciled with their children and other members of their families, enjoying time with their eight children and 12 grandchildren. They said they’ve never kept their rela-tionship a secret, but as with most gay people they know, they don’t fl aunt it either. So why write a book now, when they could live quietly, enjoy their retirement and their healed relationships with family? Speaking out “Gay teen suicides are the highest of any group,” Zahn said. “We wrote the book to help families acknowledge their gay children, to help teach everyone to use less pe-jorative words and put downs like ‘You’re so gay.’ It was dif-fi cult enough for me and Jane to go through what we did and we were adults, married and with children. “Young people don’t have the resources to cope,” Zahn said. “We don’t wear our rela-tionship on our sleeve but [if by writing the book] we can save the life of one teenager, it’s worth it.” Zahn said the story of the Twin Cities teen boy who com-mitted suicide recently really hit close to home. “I have a nephew age 14 who is gay,” Zahn said. “He couldn’t handle the self-hatred and felt so alone until he came out. It’s so frightening to feel you have this secret and that if people fi nd out, they will despise you or treat you differently.“We had it happen to us in middle age and it took all of our resources to deal with and cope with the resulting backlash and implications to our families … We really believe in education of the issue,” Zahn said. “The value of our book is that through story, we can humanize this is-sue and continue the education process by speaking to groups. Something needs to be done to turn the tide to stop looking at gays and lesbians as second-class citizens. Much of our society is still not in that place.” Lesbians? Us? When the two women met in 1980, each was married, Zahn for 13 years, Weiss for 18. Each had four children, ranging in age from 3 to 18. They said they couldn’t have been more tradi-tional. Zahn and her family lived in South Minneapolis; Weiss was a stay-at-home mom/country club wife in Eagan.“I called her Mrs. Homes and Gardens Suburban Meatloaf Queen,” Zahn said. When they met, they felt an immediate bond. They found they could talk and discuss everything. It was so different from how they felt with their partners in marriage. The two women shared interests in spirituality, prayer, personal growth, their careers and being moms. Even their opposite charac-teristics seemed to draw them closer instead of apart. Zahn was outgoing and confident; Weiss was quiet and refl ective. Eventually, the two women realized that what they felt for each other was love. It confused them. They were married. They had children. How could they be lesbians? They didn’t even know any lesbians. “I was so homophobic,” Zahn said about her confused feel-ings at that time. “I was mad at God.” While Weiss wasn’t quite as homophobic, she too didn’t un- derstand what was happening. Neither one could have predicted the emotional roller coaster and the heartbreak that would come when both left their husbands to live together. “It was so emotionally diffi -cult,” Zahn said. “I was so in love with this person, but I couldn’t talk about it or acknowledge it. I felt I had to make up stories about what I was doing and who I was spending time with.”“I’d never felt this way be-fore,” Weiss said. “It threw us for such a loop. We were examining our whole lives, asking ourselves, ‘Was it something I repressed all these years?’ And then you’re afraid, ‘If other people fi nd out, what will happen to our ca-reers?’” Yet through it all, “It felt to me,” Zahn said, “that I would have loved the soul of Jane, no matter what package it came wrapped in, color, race, gender. It happened to be female.” Fall from the pedestal Acknowledging their rela-tionship, then dealing with the subsequent ostracism, preju-dice, and outright hate was dif-fi cult for the women, especially for Weiss. “It was a terrible fall from the pedestal,” Weiss said. “My husband and I had been part of the country club set, and all that changed overnight. Now I was despised. I got phone calls from women who’d been friends. ‘I never want to speak to you again,’ they’d say and hang up.“I had to re-examine who I was each time I was hit with an attack,” Weiss said. “My family thought I was demon-possessed. It was horrible and painfully demoralizing.” Although Zahn’s family was equally surprised, her family was more accepting. But Zahn struggled, too. “Ultimately, I couldn’t believe it,” Zahn said. “I was very ho-mophobic. I felt shameful. ‘Oh my God,’ I thought. ‘Am I one of them?’ We had an apartment near Lake Harriet, and Jane and I would sit on the beach and watch all the families there picnicking. “I’d think, ‘Now who am I?’” Zahn said. “I’m not a wife, I don’t have a traditional family anymore. People looked down on my relationship. It took a good two years for me to regain my equilibrium.” Are we the only ones? “Having so much adversity brought us closer,” Zahn said. But they felt isolated. They won-dered if there were other women in same gender relationships out there, women they could talk to and share their experience and perhaps learn how to deal with their confl icting feelings. “I started studying and read-ing books about homosexuality,” Zahn said. “I thought, ‘If I’m going to be one of them, I better fi nd out more about it.’”Eventually, they found several circles of women in same-gender relationships. It was a revelation, especially for Zahn. “They’re from every walk of life,” Zahn said. “I can’t say enough about these women who are among the brightest, the most accomplished people. My stereo-type of gay women had been the bull dyke in motorcycle boots and a buzz cut. But it runs the gamut, from the stereotype to lipstick lesbians like us. These women are doctors, lawyers, artists, actors, professionals. And, they included us in their circles.” Humanizing the issue “We stayed under the radar for so many years for our kids,” Zahn said. Today their adult children are in their 30s and 40s, with families of their own. “Now we feel we have a huge education role to play,” Zahn said. “One of the reasons that the public/media/pulpits write such scandalous articles about homosexuality is that for too long, we’ve let the radical gay/lesbian fringe set the tone, when actually there are a lot of view-points. “We have friends in every profession, all who are very low-profi le people,” Zahn said. “Unfortunately, the ones that get visibility in the media are the radicals.” Ten years ago, the women began their book project, hop-ing their story could help put a face on gay relationships, how two traditional women and their families reeled and then healed from the effects of their revelation. “It’s not just about homosexu-als but families and changes with jobs, homes, families,” Zahn said. “It’s about a journey — the transitions of women at mid-life. The women have been an informal resource for others going through similar transfor-mations. The book “opens up the issue to a broader audience,” Zahn said. “We’re just beginning this journey to speak out.”Last week, after learning of the suicide of Tyler Clementi, Weiss and Zahn asked, “How many more deaths will it take before we realize that the op-position of society and reli-gious dogma to gays is what’s causing this level of self-hatred in young people who have so little (emotional) reserve other than just escaping from it all? “It’s so important for fami-lies to have conversations with their children about the issue that oppression of any individu-als or groups can have devastat-ing effects,” Zahn wrote in an e-mail. “And that name-calling by children — based on any difference, whether it be racial, religious, sexual preference, in-telligence, body type, etc., — is simply not acceptable. Parents might ask their children what it would feel like if other kids called them dumb, or Jew, or fat, or gay, or etc., and stipulate that, “Our family doesn’t do this to other people because it’s so hurtful.”Focused fundraising highlights many needsI read an article in the Star-Tribune last week about foun-dations and corporations that have started to redirect more of their resources to one spe-cifi c issue, rather than giving lesser amounts to a greater number of causes. This is good news, certainly, for the issues and conditions that are receiving greater attention and more resources. But it’s disastrous for those that will now be losing out on the fund-ing they would otherwise have received. The idea, of course, is to fo-cus and concentrate resources on one major issue at a time in order to have a more meaning-ful, measurable and long-last-ing impact on the situation, perhaps even eliminating it entirely – as would be the case with fi nding a cure or vaccine for a specifi c illness or disease, or coming up with a treatment or protocol that would address both the problems that bring about a certain condition and the problems that are caused by it. Poverty, obesity, and il-literacy are a few examples, although they’re a lot more complex than any one solution would be able to address. Betty LIEDTKE FIND YOUR BURIED TREASURE And that’s the whole point. Whether they affect millions of people or just a handful, whether they are deadly or merely annoy-ing, whether their symptoms or consequences last for a few days or for generations to come, the issues and illnesses facing us to-day need time and attention, and they need money for research and development, for testing and treatment, for education and for implementation. Deciding who gets what, and how much, is no easy task. Nor is getting the funds to distribute in the fi rst place. As an individual and a mem-ber of society, I want to help, and I’m happy to make donations when and where I can. But I’ve also grown cautious and suspi-cious over time because of the number and frequency of re-quests that come in the mail and on the phone, and because of the fraudulent and frivolous use of funds collected by many organi-zations. Like most people, I just want to know that my donations are being well-managed and well-spent, and that they’re being used to make a positive difference for the people they’re meant to help and for the problems they’re meant to overcome.The day after I read the news-paper article about focused giv-ing, I saw its power in action when my husband and I sat down to watch the Bears vs. the Giants on Sunday Night Football. The entire NFL is supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month not only with an awareness cam-paign, but with fundraising ef-forts all over the country. I found this promising and exciting for a number of reasons. One is that, as a breast cancer survivor, I find it very gratifying that an organization as male-oriented as the NFL is supporting a cause that is so female-oriented in terms of the people who are most directly affected by it. I felt very emotional looking at the human “pink ribbon” on the fi eld before the game started, consist-ing of breast cancer survivors dressed in pink and holding up an enormous length of pink fab-ric to form the symbol for breast cancer awareness. And I was both inspired and entertained by all the pink accents and embel-lishments on the uniforms and equipment of the players, staff, and offi cials. When that many people rally behind a cause, a lot of money can be raised, and a lot of people can be inspired to help. But at the same time, my heart and my concern go out to the smaller, less visible organi-zations and causes, especially knowing that they’ve most likely lost funding due to the effects of the economy, and now due to more focused and concentrated efforts by big foundations to fund major initiatives. So I’m pay-ing more attention to “quieter” causes whose needs are just as great, whose beneficiaries are just as worthy, and whose results can be just as profound. I’ll make more of a point now of donating things like books, backpacks, paper and pencils to schools and churches that provide sup- plies for children in need. I’ll spend more time putting people I know in touch with each other when one has information and resources that the other can use. And I’ll pay better attention to what’s going on around me so I don’t miss opportunities where I can make a difference in another person’s life, even if it’s a one-time thing or it affects only a few people or does so for only a short amount of time. It may not seem to have as much meaning or impact as sizeable donations made to major issues and initiatives, but whatever actions we take, and whatever donations we make, can be just as far-reaching, and can have a ripple effect that expands well beyond our awareness. I hope that the focused giving being done by major foundations and fundraisers has the desired effect of reducing or wiping out some of the serious ills and is-sues in our society today. And I hope that all of us will do what we can to work on the rest of them. Chanhassen resident Betty Liedtke is a writer, professional speaker, and Certified Dream Coach®. Visit her website at www.fi ndyourburiedtreasure.com.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 27  All Dailies–62 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune, Brandon Stahl Treatment Without Parole: the Minnesota Sex Offender Program Out of more than five dozen entries in this category, this series really stood out. An in-depth and sometimes shocking look at a system that is clearly not working while also costing taxpayers millions. At the same time, the series shows the difficulty in treating these extremely tough cases and the understandable hesitation at simply releasing these sex offenders. Provocative, well-written and thoroughly researched. Second Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester, Jeffrey Pieters Wet House Series With so many worthy entries second place in this category was an extremely tough decision. But I kept coming back to the people and the program chronicled in the Wet House package of stories. Not only is it a story well-told—the characters depicted here are likely to stick with me for some time—but it puts into stark relief a counter-intuitive solution to the very tough problem of chronic alcoholism. And while the story shows it’s not a perfect solution, it gives valuable time and column inches to a potentially life- changing approach to this social problem. Weeklies up to 2,500–28 entries First Place: Lake County News-Chronicle, Two Harbors, Mike Creger Good idea, good timing led to beloved trail Really in-depth package. Reporting that matched the importance of the trail to the local community. Second Place: Jackson County Pilot, Dan Condon A piece of history Tied the past in with the future very nicely. Weeklies over 2,500–47 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Brian Wierima Ageless Ace Technically sound, good quotes, great story. Second Place: Mille Lacs Messenger, Isle, Rob Passons Return of the Sodbuster Well written, great story idea. Honorable Mention: Becker County Record, Brian Basham The Mighty Muskie Hunter Interesting subject, story captured character. Sports Story CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  NewsNews Chronicle SHERIFF’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . .2A NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3A SCHOOLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6A SHORELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B OBITUARIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3B BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4B OUTDOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5B CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6B REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7B Just 9 holes open at g olf course PAGE 3A LAKE COUNTY VOLUME 38 ● NUMBER 1 6 TWO SECTIONS ● 16 PAGE S SERVING LAKE COUNTY S INCE 1890 ● WWW.TWOH ARBORSMN.COM FRIDAY APRIL 22 2011 $1 INSIDE ● How do your local groceries stack up? years on the Superior Hiking Tr ail25 Forum Newspapers A group of hikers stand on Ely’s Peak in Duluth in 2005. The Duluth se ction of the Superior H iking Trail is the latest section completed in th e 25 years since the trail be gan as an idea by outd oors enthusiasts along the North Shore. The t rail is 275 miles long a fter starting with just e ight miles. SHTA file Some of the earliest bu shwhackers and builde rs of bridges for the tra il were workers laid off by Reserve Mining i n Silver Bay. The pay w as in the $5-6 range bu t was an appreciat- ed alternative to no inc ome in bleak economic times along the Shore . Forum Newspapers Hiking trail pioneers ar en’t comfortable with n aming a favorite portion of the t rail but, when pressed, the Twin Lakes loop out of Silve r Bay often came up. Mike Creger Gayle Coyer, executive director for the Superio r Hiking Trail Associatio n, is busy this month at the Two Harbors office plan ning the May 6-8 annu al meeting at Wolf Ridge in Finland. The event m arking the 25th anniver - sary of the trail will kic k off a “Seven Summit s Challenge” offering p rizes to those who climb the highest peaks along th e 282 miles of trail from Duluth to the border w ith Canada. The associ ation isn’t resting on its birthday laurels. It still needs plenty of volunte ers in the coming mon ths and years to help blaze and maintain trails and trailheads. Good idea, good timi ng led to beloved trai l NEWS-CHRONICLE Saying “it seemed lik e a reason- able thing to do,” Lee Schaar put pen to paper in 1985 an d wrote down what fellow foresters in the Tofte area had known for years: T here could be a nice hiking trail alon g the ridgeline overlooking Lake Su perior on the North Shore. Schaar’s “Thomas Jeff erson” mo- ment eventually led to today’s Supe- rior Hiking Trail that runs from Du- luth to Canada with just a 17-mile gap left to blaze. With the general ide a on paper, organizers went to w ork in 1986. This year marks the 25 -year anniver- sary of the first carvin gs of the trail and the formation of the association that keeps it a Minne sota treasure. Memories from the m any volun- teers and agency leade rs who helped gather funding and m omentum for the trail – and those who went into the wild for flagging , blazing, and building bridges – ho ld fond mem- ories of what has been called a “syn- chronicity of events.” Today and next week , we take a look at some of the ea rly trailblazers who helped on the g round and in organizing the Superio r Hiking Trail Association, which to day consists of more than 3,500 mem bers, 300 ac- tive volunteers and 28 2 miles of care- fully maintained trail . Learn how a nation al disaster marked the first meet ing for the as- sociation, how tough e conomic times were leavened by wor k on the trail, and why hikers can find what can seem like unusual tw ists and turns along the way. There were many cha racters who played parts. We offe r a small sam- pling as the Superior Hiking Trail marks 25 years in Ma y at the associ- ation’s annual meetin g in Finland. INSIDE ● Step into trail history,4A-5A , 7A. BY MATT SUOJA [email protected] om Retail food prices incre ased during the first qua rter of 2011 nationwide, ac cording to the latest America n Farm Bureau Federation’s “M arket- basket Survey” that in cluded comparisons to averag e costs in state by the Min nesota Farm Bureau. The News-Chronicle did its own local survey on food prices at grocery store s to see how they compare t o state and national averages . We visited SuperOn e in Two Harbors and Zup ’s in Sil- ver Bay for some pric e com- parisons. It’s not a sc ientific study and prices can fl uctuate for a variety of reaso ns. We looked for the cheapes t prices we could find for th e foods outside of special sale s. Both SuperOne and Z up’s came under the natio nal and state averages for veget able oil ($1.66 in Two Harb ors and $2.62 in Silver Bay fo r a 32- ounce container). In the na- tion it cost $2.88, up 29 cents, and it come s in at $2.66 in Minnesota. Boneless chicken br easts were more expensive a t Zup’s and SuperOne per pound. They were $3.99 at Zu p’s and $4.71 at SuperOne co mpared to $3.06 in Minneso ta and $3.32 in the nation (up 22 cents per pound). Zup’s came in at $2.5 0 for five pounds of potatoe s while it sat at $2.65 in Mi nnesota and $2.64 in the nati on. Su- perOne came way un der the national and state ave rage at $1.69. Overall potatoe s are up 14 cents nationally. Even though baco n is down 46 cents per po und in the nation at $3.86 , Zup’s came in at $4.67 a pound while it was $3.49 a t Super One. The state ave rage is $3.87. Overall, most prices a t the locations were similar . It was more expensive to buy orange juice and whole milk in Two Harbors and Silver Ba y com- pared to the nation an d state while it was cheaper to buy bread. According to the AFB F, re- tail prices for some foods, meat in particular, w ill con- tinue to rise during th e year as it takes time for farm ers to increase the size of the ir herds to accommodate an increase in demand. “Home cooks shoppin g for staples to make their favorite shepherd’s pie or chic ken pot pie recipe will definite ly leave the grocery store with lighter wallets,” said John An derson, a Farm Bureau econ omist. “As anticipated, the in creased consumer demand fo r meats and dairy products t hat be- gan in 2009 and con tinued through 2010 remai ns evi- dent as we look forwar d to the middle of 2011.” According to the Un ited States Department o f Agri- culture, Americans sp end just under 10 percent of dispos- able income on food, t he low- est average of any cou ntry in the world. INSIDE Apples to apples ● See how local grocery s tore prices on your favorite s taples compare to state and na tional averages as general foo d prices rise. Page 1B. duluthnewstribune.co m $1.50 Sunday, June 26, 2011 duluthnewstribune.co m $1.50 2011 26, June Sunday, DuluthNewsTribune Contents Lotteries A2 Obituaries D3-5 Opinion A9-11 Outdoors C6-8 Lotteries A2 Sports C1-5 TV listings F8 Travel C5 Get home delivery (218) 723-5252 or (800) 456-8080 Today: Partly sunny, chance of rain High: 73 Low: 58 Weather Tomorrow: Better chance of storms High: 73 Low: 50 News tips (218) 723-5300 SKIHUTEAST • 1032East 4th Street • 218.724.8525 SKIHUTWEST • 5607Gran dAvenue • 218.624.5889 www.theskihut.com SKI HUT EAST • 1032 East 4t h Street • 218.724.8525 SKI HUT WEST • 5607 Grand Avenue • 218.624.5889 www.theskihut.com SkiHut’sKayakan dSUPSALE Now thru July 3 R001132278-0626 Great savings and rebates on our selection of Ka yaks and Stand-Up Paddleb oards! Quetico adventure C8 Millions spent on rehabilitatio n, but no one has been rehabilita ted NEWS TRIBUNE GRAPHIC S Cost to run the Minnes ota Sex Offender Progr am since 2005 0 20 40 60 80 100 2005 2006 200 7 2008 2009 2010 $25,263,400 $59,219,900 $71,087,200 $58,765,700 $74,537,000 $25,263,400$25 263 4003 $59,219,900$ 0 $58,765,705 $74,537,000$7 0 Co st (in m ill io ns of do lla rs ) 134.4% increase 20.0% increase 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 30 149 575 618 1,109 Po pu la tio n 396.7% increase 285.9% increase 7.5% increase 79.5% increase 1990 2000 2010 2011 20 20* 3030 149 575 618618 396.7% increase 285.9% increase 7.5% increase 1990 2000 2010 2011 20 20* *Projected The offender populatio n continues to skyrock et and is expected to dou ble in the next 10 year s To run the MSOP in 20 10, the state of Minnes ota spent nearly as much as it cost to r un three prisons and h ouse nearly 3 1/2 times as many offende rs. Cost Population MSOP $58,766,700 605 Prison totals $61,986,000 2,066 Moose Lake $25,040,000 1,033 Oak Park Heights $20,884,000 448 Shakopee $16,062,000 585 SOURCES: Minnesota Depa rtment of Human Services, D epartment of Corrections, of fice of the legislative auditor Minnesota Sex Offender Program costs Minnesota Sex Offe nder Program at Moose Lake MINNESOTA SEX OF FENDER PROGRAM | TREATMENT WITH OUT PAROLE | PAR T 1 OF 4 BRANDON STAHL [email protected] .com Y oumight not care about people like 43-year-old Russell Lynn Norton, a form er Eveleth and Duluth resident and convicted sex o ffender whom the state of M innesota considers a psychop ath un- able to control his im pulses to reoffend. But in 2010, the stat e spent an average of $120,000 a year to house, feed and treat offenders like Norton through theMinnes ota Sex Offender Program, nearly 3½ times as much a s it would spend if he w ere in a state prison. Created in themid-1 990s, MSOP is not suppose d to be incarceration. LikeN orton, nearly all the offende rs there have completed thei r prison time and are commi tted to the center for intensive treatment for eventual release back into society. Thehundred s of of- fenderswhohave go ne throughMSOPare c alled “pa- tients” or “clients” in stead of inmates. Yet despite spending $386.9million since 2 005 alone, the number of patients successfully rehabili tated— permanently release d back into the community — is zero. Some have served li fe sentences there; mo re than 18 have died in the h eavily secured facility surr ounded by razor-wire fences . Critics have used that poor success rate to labelMSOPM in- nesota’s Guantanam o or Gulag. Norton said he saw his commitment as the equiva- lent of a death sente nce, which he said he an d three others tried to escap e last year. “It came down to a n eces- sity, protectingmys elf, pro- tectingmy very psy che, to leave this place. Bec ause it’s just punitive,” Nort on told the News Tribune d uring an in-person interview . “People in here shouldn’t be treated any differently than people out there on the stre ets. To do so would be puni tive; it would be punishme nt. And this isn’t supposed t o be about punishment. It’s sup- posed to be treatme nt.” MARTIGA LOHN Associated Press ST. PAUL—Minne sota’s top leaders holed up in a generic con- ference room for a s econd day on Saturday, trying to break through the budget gridlock with an impending gover nment shut- down only six days away. They emerged after almost eight hours with little to s ay except that they planned to keep talking today. After months of pub lic dis- agreements and rec riminations, Gov. Mark Dayton a nd top Re- publican lawmaker s said they are committed to av oiding a shut- down. The Democra tic governor said a pact to stay q uiet about the content of negotiati ons is critical to getting a deal don e. “We all see the poss ibility of working things out to avoid a shutdown, and we’r e all in favor of keeping that effor t going to try to realize that goal,” Dayton said after the talks. The discussions too k place in the State Office Bui lding across the street from the C apitol, with Dayton advisers an d key law- makers responsible for specific pieces of the budget shuttling in and out as negotiati ons turned from higher educat ion to the en- vironment, then he alth and wel- fare programs and f inally, taxes. Reporters and photo graphers loi- tered outside the ro om, waiting for details from the meetings on the other side of gla ss windows sheathed bymini-bl inds. “We have a conside rable road trip ahead of us,” sa id Rep. Jim Abeler, the Republi can House leader on health an d social serv- ice spending, after t alks in his area finished. Along with taxes, h ealth and welfare spending is the most con- tentious budget are a between Dayton and the Rep ublican Legislature. Dayton,GOP to continue budget talks today Online View video inter- views with sex offenders com- mitted to Moose Lake and St. Peter at duluth newstribune.com About this series The Minnesota Sex Offen der Program at Moose L ake is called a treatment cente r for high-risk offenders. But since it opened in the early 19 90s, the program has ne ver re- leased a client. Does MS OP offer treatment or pu nishment? A four-part Duluth News Tribune series starting to day, using extensive research and interviews with offic ials, experts and sex offender s, tries to answer that qu estion. Today The state of Minnesota s pent an average of $120,000 in 2010 to hou se, feed and treat sex offenders throughM SOP, nearly 3½ times asmuch as it spen ds for state prison inmates. The legislative a uditor’s office, ex- perts and sex offenders o ffer a harsh critique of the program. More on Pages A6-7 Monday Three sex offend- ers committed to MSOP in Moose Lake explain why they don’t believe they’ll ever be released. Tuesday Confining sex offenders with- out genuine treatment ha s been found to be uncons titu- tional in Washington stat e. And many former MSOP em- ployees say that’s what’s happening in Minnesota. Wednesday A small minority of sex o f- fenders havemade it to t he final phases of treatment in St. Peter, where they live in more homelike settings. Some argue not even the y should be released. $155 IN COUPONSINSIDE See MSOP, Page A7 Russell Lynn Norton, 4 3, tried to escape from the Min nesota Sex Offender Program in Moose Lake last year. Bob King / [email protected] s.com See Budget, Page A4
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 28 Business Story Sports Story All Dailies–42 entries First Place: Marshall Independent, Matt Dahlseid Finding a new home The story, like the protagonist himself, meets everything head on. The lead—your PlayStation or your well-being, essentially—was simple yet powerful. Well done. Second Place: St. Cloud Times, Andy Rennecke SCSU senior back on field after accident I read this story feeling just like Geissler’s friends . . . simply couldn’t imagine going through this myself. The writer did a great job of just getting out of the way and letting the details, both gruesome and inspiring, tell the story. Honorable Mention: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Ryan Clark Eligibility fuels debate Clearly the best hard news story in the category. Presents the student’s eligibility situation clearly and concisely, while not taking sides on who’s right or wrong. I’m sure there is more on this, I’ll actually take time of my own to find out what happened. Weeklies up to 1,500–10 entries First Place: Citizen’s Advocate, Henning, Chad Koenen Green pastures ahead for Gardens Gourmet A business story with a human element. Writing is tight, easy to read. Nicely done. Second Place: Lakefield Standard, Justin R. Lessman It Took Teamwork Writer did a good job of showing how the events of this story would impact the whole area. Nicely done. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE NFL roundup................ ........2B Big Ten notebook ......... ........3B New US soccer coach .. ........4B Area racing points leade rs......5B Lynx continue hot streak at home vs. Seattle Storm SPORTS 1b INDePeNDeNT-MaRSHaLL, M INN. SaTURDaY-SUNDaY JULY 30-31, 2011 amateur Baseball Essig 2, Lamberton 1 IN THE NEWS Saturday’s games amateur Baseball Marshall at Mankato Twins Milroy Yankees vs. Watkins at Eden Valley Sunday’s games amateur Baseball Lamberton at Essig SCHEDULE S CORES Phillies acquire Pence from astros PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Ph iladelphia Phillies made anothe r dead- line splash Friday night, acquir ing All-Star right fielder Hunter Pence from the Houston Astros. The NL East-leading Phillies go t Pence and cash from Housto n for three minor leaguers and a pla yer to be named, shoring up th eir lineup as they try to make it back to the World Series for the third time in four years. The 28-year-old Pence began the day with a .309 batting ave rage, 11 homers and 62 RBIs. Page 3b By Alex Oey [email protected] ependent.com The Schwan’s USa C up is the largest youth soccer t ournament in the Western Hemisph ere, and this year Marshall was re presented in the under-16 girls p ortion of the tournament. Marshall freshman Megan Vogl had wanted to play in the Schwan’s USa Cup f or years, but other commitments k ept her from making the trip. This year, after jo ining the Dakota alliance for the summer, everything came to gether per- fectly and Vogl fo und herself heading to blaine fo r the tourna- ment, which started o n July 19. “I’ve been wanting to do this for a couple years, b ut I’ve never been able to sign up because of conflicts,” said Vogl . “because I played on the Sioux Falls (S.D.) team this year, I had a chance.” Vogl took advantag e of the guest Player Program at the USa Cup, where coaches who need to fill out their rosters c an find play- ers, like Vogl, that w ant to com- pete. “You just have to go o nline and answer a few question s (to be con- sidered),” Vogl said . “If a team was short players, the y could look at what you said and could e-mail back (if interested).” Vogl was one of the lu cky play- ers to be picked u p when FC Northwest explosio n of Win- nipeg, Manitoba, C anada con- tacted her to p lay outside midfielder. “They got ahold of me two weeks before the tournament started,” said Vogl. “ (The coach) asked me where I wa s from, how many years I had b een playing, my positions and oth er things.” Kelly Moar, one o f the FC Northwest coaches, s aid that after finding Megan it w as a few e- mails and calls befor e deciding to add her to the team. “First we sent them an e-mail and told them a litt le about our eDeN PRaIRIe (aP ) — Donovan McNa bb didn’t agree to a trade to the Minnesot a Vikings to sit on the sidelines and mentor a young rookie. That’s not why the V ikings brought him h ere, either. The Vikings officiall y announced their tra de with Washington on Friday, shortly aft er league rules permi tted new contracts to be signed. The Vikings sent a 2012 sixth-ro und draft choice and a conditional 2013 sixt h-rounder to the Red skins to get the veter an quarterback they nee ded. With first-round draf t pick Christian Pond er already in the mix an d the 34-year-old Mc Nabb coming off a down ye ar with the Redskins, some wondered if there wo uld be an open compe tition for the starting job in training camp. but M cNabb and Vikings head coa ch Leslie Frazier put those questions to rest Frid ay night. “When you trade fo r a guy who has bee n a starter for 12 years, you’re not bringing him in here to be a backup ,” McNabb said. “Y ou’re bringing him in here to win now.” Frazier got to know McNabb well when he was an assistant in Ph iladelphia from 1999- 2002, McNabb’s first four seasons with the e agles. When the NFL locko ut wiped out all of the minicamps and orga n- ized team activities th at would have helped Ponder prepare to sta rt right away, there was one guy Frazier targ eted to bridge the ga p from brett Favre to P onder. “We’ve signed him h oping he’s going to b e our starting quar- terback barring some unforeseen circumsta nces,” Frazier said. “H e looks great. He’s eve rything I thought he w ould be in our conver - sations and I fully ex pect him to go out an d lead our football tea m to the 2011 season.” The Vikings announ ced they signed New Orleans defensive tackle Remi ayodele to a three-year deal an d re-signed kicker Ry an Longwell to a four-ye ar deal. They have als o agreed to terms wit h BriNgiN’ HEaT oN THE WEsT CoasT AP Photo Minnesota Twins’ Fr ancisco Liriano work s against the Oaklan d Athletics during the first inning Friday in Oakland, Calif. The Twins led 5 -2 after the top of the sixth inning as the In dependent went to pr ess. Liriano had three strikeouts and gave up one one , five hits and two ea rned runs in five inni ngs. Vikings formally announce mcnabb deal McNabb Page 2b McNabb By Matt Dahlseid [email protected] llindependent.com One hundred dollars for his Playstation. That was the deal. eddie Turcios neede d the money. Video games couldn’t satisfy the t eenager’s appetite fo r activity anyway. He was crav ing the game he had played in his native Honduras ev er since he could stand upright. He needed soccer. “In my country, ever yone plays. It’s insid e you,” he said. The $100 was what T urcios had to collect t o buy a soccer uniform and jo in the Marshall United Soccer association youth pro gram. Selling his Play sta- tion was about the on ly option he had to g et enough money. He ha d no one else to go to. With cash in hand, Tu rcios went to reg- ister, but his plan hit another snag. “They asked me my a ddress and I was like, ‘I don’t know my address. I don’t have a house,’” he said. Turcios, now 18, stru ggles to piece together his tim eline. It’s understandable, his life has gone through a whir lwind of change in just a few short years. He said he came to the United States in 200 7, liv- ing for about a half a year in Montevideo with friends before headin g to Marshall to live with an aunt. She went back to Honduras in June o f 2009, leaving Turcio s without a home. Finding a new home Turcios Page 4b Photos courtesy of K athy Bartz/ Illustration by Aaron Schlemmer Leaving Honduras for an un known country, Eddie Turcios scraped by unt il the Marshall soccer community brought h im in Marshall’s Megan Vogl suits up with neighbors from the Nor th Photo courtesy of To dd Vogl Marshall’s Megan Vo gl, left, holds off a d efender for the ball d uring a pool play contest aga inst Orono at the Sch wan’s USA Cup. Vog l was a guest player with FC NW Explosion, from Winnipeg, Manitoba, compet- ing in the under-16 s ilver bracket. Vogl Page 2b Family entertainmentFamily Fun Night at Henning School featured everything from popcorn to movies and games. Page 2 Meet the artist The Landmark Center hosted an open house for residents to meet artist Aldo Moroni last week. Page 12 Monday, April 4, 2011 $1.00 Single issue Copy Citizen’s AdvocateHenning, Minn. est. 1891 Get a one year subscription to the Citizen’s Advocate for as low as $27 WHAT’S INSIDEOpinion................................... 4Obituaries............................... 5Ottertail................................... 6 Church ...................................7Entertainment.......................8Classifi eds............................... 9Sports....................................10 Contact informationPhone: (218) 548-5585Fax: (218) 548-5582Email: [email protected] Citizen’s Advocate By Chad Koenen [email protected] While many rural communities are struggling with declining popu-lations, Henning and much of Otter Tail County continue to enjoy an anomaly of a growing population. According to the 2010 Census, nearly all of the communities in Ot-ter Tail County experienced a growth in population from 2000 to 2010. Of those communities, fi ve communi-ties in central Otter Tail County have increased their population by over 10 percent in the past 10 years. In Henning, the 2010 population has increased by 11.5 percent from 2000. According to the 2000 Census, Henning had a population of 719. Today, the total population eclipsed the 800 mark with a total of 802 peo-ple. The increase is a change from the de- cline in p o p u - l a t i o n Henning Elementary stu-dents will be jumping rope and shooting baskets for more than just fun in April. Henning students will par-ticipate in the Jump Rope and Hoops for Heart program from April 4-26. During the three-week event, students in grades K-4 will participate in the Jump Rope for Heart and students in 5-6 grade will par-ticipate in the Hoops for Heart program. The programs help raise money for the American Heart Association. Last year Henning students raised the fi fth most money in the state for school’s that participate in both the Jump Rope and Hoops for Heart program. While the $7,520 the students raised was the fi fth most in their division, it is not a school record. The most money raised in the Jump Rope and Hoops for Heart program in Henning was $8,737 in 2008. Volume 120, Issue 14 Photo by Chad Koenen A new green house is bringing life back to Gardens Gourmet in rural Henning. The old green house was destroyed in the June 17 tornado that hit the area. Green pastures ahead for Gardens Gourmet Gardens Gourmet builds new green house in wake of tornado Area communities show strong population growthLatest census fi nds Henning, Ottertail, Vining grow by double digits in past 10 years Refsal to teach wood carving in Vining See Communities grow Page 3 Kindergarten registration set for April 12 Henning students to jump/ shoot for a cause Built last fall, with the help of a group of people from the tornado assistance, the green house is al-ready fi lled with everything from tomatoes to peppers and cucum-bers that will soon go on sale to residents throughout the area. “It’s all about trying to grow food, locally for local people,” said Chuck. But the new green house isn’t the only new addition to Gardens Gourmet. Two grants will give the farm an opportunity to experiment with a high-tunnel house and an elevated bed, which features in- fl oor thermal heat. High-tunnel house Resembling a stripped down version of a giant green house, the Webb’s will unveil a new addition to Gardens Gourmet this spring—a high-tunnel. Funding for the project was made possible by a grant, and will allow the Webb’s to see if the structure can adequately grow plants like a green house for nearly half the price. Chuck said a high-tunnel is a naturally ventilated house that is protected from the elements by a sheet of plastic. There is no heat or ventilation system, which means the structures can be built fairly inexpensively when compared to a green house. Chuck said having a high-tunnel will allow Gardens By Chad Koenen [email protected] As blowing snow falls from the sky, Chuck Webb makes his way to his new green house. ¶ At fi rst glance, one would never know that nine months earlier the green house at Gardens Gour-met was destroyed by a tornado that rolled through Otter Tail and Wadena County. Just months after the storm, new life has been brought back to the grounds at Gardens Gourmet in rural Henning. ¶ Filled with a bevy of green produce inside, the cli-mate and scenery inside the new 3,000 square foot green house is a stark contrast from the late March snow outside. See New greenhouse Page 2 The Vining Community Center will play host to one of the foremost authorities in “fl at plan carving” from May 10-11. Harley Refsal, who grew up in Hoffman, will be teaching his knowledge and skill with other carvers from across the area. Refsal has carved a niche for himself in the Scandina-vian-style fl at-plane fi gure carving world. He has taught on both sides of the Atlantic for more than 25 years, and his woodcarving has appeared in multiple exhibitions. He recently retired as professor of Scandinavian folk art at Luther College in Decorah, See Wood carving Page 3 Serving central Otter Tail County since 1891 2010 Census highlights Battle Lake 875Clitherall 112Deer Creek 322Henning 802New York Mills 1,199Ottertail 572Parkers Prairie 1,011Perham 2,985Vining 78 Henning Public School is hosting their kindergarten registration and in-formation night on Tuesday, April 12 from 6-7 p.m. Kindergarten registra-tion will be held at the Henning School Library. During the meeting, parents will be provided with a variety of information including school procedures, expecta-tions, transportation provisions, and the chance to visit a kindergarten class-room. The meeting is open to all Henning School District children who will be fi ve years of age by September 1. Par-ents are asked to bring their completed kindergarten registration form to the meeting. For more information contact the school offi ce at 583-2927.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 29  CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  Weeklies 1,501-2,500–14 entries First Place: Jackson County Pilot, Justin R. Lessman Teamwork gets it done I have to commend Mr. Lessman on not only a great job on his entered story about how this company came to town and how local, state and national resources came together to bring jobs to this community, but the entire front page package he put together—it appears—by himself. A great comprehensive package of stories showing how these jobs will affect the town. Second Place: Renville County Register, Olivia, Susan Williams Poised for growth A neat story on a niche market and its impact, not only locally, but on the Upper Midwest. Very educational if you don’t know a whole lot about sheep shearing. Honorable Mention: Lake County News-Chronicle, Two Harbors, Mike Creger Vikings great teams up on new city sports bar A very cool off-the-beaten-path story about a sports legend and a local businessman teaming up. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–34 entries First Place: Northfield News, Jacqueline A. Pavek Why do Northfield’s restaurants fail? This is a very good topic in many communities, and the reporting steps outside each business to look inside. Attractive page design compliments solid effort. Second Place: Mille Lacs Messenger, Isle, Rob Passons A new kind of dream job Unlike previous generations, we don’t always keep the same job throughout our careers anymore. Topic is timely, written well, with solid presentation. Now and then photos are a plus. Weeklies over 5,000–20 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader, Jorge Sosa Niesen seeks good times at Hard Times Strong lede backed up by very interesting story. Proof a solid story doesn’t have to be 50 inches to get its point across. Great job. Second Place: Hutchinson Leader, Doug Hanneman Hutchinson Technology moving production out of town Well-written story about an extremely tough subject; story back up by pertinent breakout boxes, good art and solid wordsmithing. Business 9A SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HUTCHINSON LEAD ER HAVE AN ITEM FO R THIS PAGE? Submissions and story ideas for t his page may be sent in the form of e-mail, f axes and letters. For more inform ation, call Terry Davis, Lead er staff writer, a t 320-234-4153 . Buffalo Lake truc king firm manager tou ted Kyle Kottke of Kottke Truckin g in Buffalo Lake r ecently receive d top honors from th e Minnesota Tr ucking Association at i ts 79th annual c onfer- ence for his sig nificant contrib utions to the trucking industry. Kottke was the r ecipient of the 2 011 Outstanding S ervice Award. This award was cre ated to recogn ize an individual who has significant ly con- tributed MTA’s programs and mis- sion. He has b een a member of the MTA board of directors for si x years and has worke d for Kottke Tr ucking since 1998. Now the general ma nager, Kyle is part of t he third genera tion of Kottkes who ha ve run the com pany. Kottke Truckin g is comprised of about 70 truck s and 100 traile rs that operate in the Midwest, Sou th and Southeastern part of the U nited States hauling frozen foods. It has been run by th e Kottke family since its formation in 1938. Silver Lake loses its convenience store Owners Lisa an d Steve Hauer h ave closed the SL E xpress Maratho n gas station/conven ience store along State Highway 7 in Silver Lak e. The Hauers purch ased the sto re in November 2006 and moved to Silver Lake from the T win Cities. Steve Hauer c ited the contin ued bad economy a nd escalating p rice of gasoline as the main factors i n their decision to clos e. He said the co st of a tanker truck o f fuel had mor e than doubled to $31 ,000. Hauer told the Silver Lake Le ader one thing that attracted his fa mily to Silver Lake wa s that he grew up in Montgomery, a nother town w ith a Bohemian heri tage. They also joined Holy Family Ca tholic Church, which was the same name as their former church in St. Lo uis Park. Hutchinson insura nce agent honored Roger Mies, an American Fam ily Insurance agen t in Hutchinso n, has been recognize d for customer satis- faction excelle nce under th e J.D. Power and Ass ociates Disting uished Insurance Agen cy Program. The service dis tinction was de ter- mined through an evaluation p rocess conducted by J .D. Power and A ssoci- ates. The proce ss consists of a cus- tomer satisfact ion survey mea suring customers’ ove rall experience with their current Am erican Family a gent. Mies, with an of fice at 95 Hassa n St. S.E., has been a n agent for Am erican Family since Ju ne 1961. Chamber hires Po pp for tourism/mark eting Rachael Popp , a native of the Hutchinson are a, has been hir ed by the Hutchinso n Area Chamb er of Commerce, Co nvention & Vi sitors Bureau as touri sm and market ing coordinator. Popp, who has a bachelor’s deg ree in business ma n- agement/mark et- ing from the C ol- lege of St. Be ne- dict, will use her sales and mark et- ing background in her new positio n. She can be con - tacted at the chamber by e-m ailing rachael@ explo rehutchinson.c om, or by callin g 320- 587-5252. BUSINESS BR IEFS Niesen seeks good times at Hard Tim es Entrepreneur giv es the hospitality enter prise another try even in the midst of road w ork By JORGE SOSA Staff Writer Given the cur rent economic cli- mate, it’s got to be a challengin g time to open a new r estaurant. But to do it o n a highway t hat’s under construc tion and closed to traf- fic? That might require a person with a bent sense of w it. Enter John Nie sen of Stewart, who has knowingly n amed his newe st ven- ture the Hard Times Bar and Grill. From the bars tools, made fro m sal- vaged car seats , to the menus , lami- nated onto plai n sheets of card board, Niesen embrac es the fact tha t times are indeed har d. He’s looking for the humor in the si tuation. “It seems like e verybody is sho rt of money and it almost sounds like it’s going to be th at way for awh ile,“ he said. “It actually has been that w ay for the restaurant i ndustry, too.” Neisen got his start in the bus iness in 1987, when h e bought Stewa rt’s for- mer downtown municipal liqu or store and operated i t as Neisen’s B ar until 1999. He then established C actus Jack’s in the c ity’s former Am erican Legion post on U.S. Highway 212. He sold the restaur ant and leased out the building in the fall of 2008 to fo cus on a nonprofit re lief effort he helped found, Food Fo r Kids. The restauran t changed han ds a couple of times during the pas t three years until Nies en said he deci ded to “try and run it myself again.” The re- christened eate ry opened on Ju ly 1. “I know there’s a hundred wa ys to not make it in the restauran t busi- ness,” Niesen s aid. “I think it’s easier for me to do lo wer prices and higher volume. That’s what we try fo r. They always say the m ost expensive th ing in the restaurant i s empty seats.” According to Minnesota De part- ment of Transp ortation engine er Kelly Brunkhorst, th e stretch of H ighway 212 that runs through Stewa rt will reopen in mid - or late-Septe mber. Until then, cus tomers still see m to be finding their wa y to Hard Times . “The local peop le in the surrou nd- ing communiti es have been s upport- ing us well,” N iesen said. “Th ey take the gravel road s. It says that th ey kind of like it here. I t’s kind of a nic e mes- sage. We try to make it worthw hile for them. The ide a is that ever ybody leaves happy.” Typical menu items include burg- ers, ranging fro m $3.50 to $5; sand- wiches from $ 2.50 to $4.50; dinner specials at $5.9 5 and other as sorted deals. “If everything wasn’t perf ect,” Niesen joked, “the free ice cream smoothes over a lot of bump s in the road.” As this report er’s interview with Niesen began winding down , Mon- day’s lunch cr owd started fi ling in. Many of the cu stomers greete d John by name. As if o n cue, Neil Diam ond’s “Forever in Blu e Jeans” began playing in the backgrou nd. The song s eemed to fit a place t hat Niesen hop es will become a han gout for “peop le who work hard and want somethin g good to eat, and som e good convers ation. Maybe a little re cycled humor.” RESTAURANT /BAR NOW OPEN Located at 1st Ave SE, Hutc hinson Next to Library Square Wednesdays 3-6 pm Saturdays 8-no on FAR MERS MARKET 70834-S28-40 Robert G. Ovrebo , DVM Business: 507.96 4.2682 Cell: 507.995.05 07 Experienced in D airy, Beef, Swine, Ultrasou nd Repro, Clinical Medicin e & Surgery, Consultation Ser vices 79 22 6 S3 3- 45 LARGE ANIMAL VETERINARIAN At our Collision Cen ter: You will be 100% satisfied– that’s our guaran tee. 74 06 8 FORD • LINCOLN • MERCURY • CHRYS LER • DODGE • JEE P 320-587-4 748 1-866-66 2-9243 1165 Hwy. 7 West • Hu tchinson www.jaym alonemoto rs.com Family Owned ~ 1 Owner 1 Deal ership Dave Skoog Replacement Windows All Custom Mad e With Welded S ashes & Frames . Tilt in Sashes • Many color opti ons 612320-587-33 45 Free Estimates • Lifetime Warra nty DO YOU HAVE openin gs at your Daycare? Run an ad in the Hutchinson Lea der for only $20! Includes: 20 wo rds in bold, border and photo. Your ad will run Wednesday, and in the Sunday Leader and Shopper. * 36 Washington A ve. W. Hutchinson, MN 55350 320-587-5000 hutchinsonleade r.com *Receive a FREE “S coop, the Newsh ound” coloring/activity book for each c hild in your Day care. Ad good for in-h ome daycares o nly. 75 35 9 PARKVIEW DENTAL 10 Hassan St. N E., Hutchinson 320-587-2726 e-mail parkview @hutchtel.net is proud to announce the addition of associate dentist Dr. Trevor Smith Dr. Smith receive d his Doctor of Dental Medici ne from the University of Pit tsburgh Dental School an d recently completed a Gen eral Practice Residency at the University of Minnesota Physi cians Dental Clin ic. Dr. Smith’s hobb ies include readin g, outdoor recreatio n and traveling. He is also an avid baseball fan. Dr. Smith is exci ted to enter priva te practice in Hutch inson and looks forward to develo ping relationship s with his patients and the commun ity. Dr. Smith began seeing patients August 1st and w ill be offering evening appointm ents. www.parkviewd entalofhutchinso n.com Trevor Smith, DMD 76 72 8 PARKVIEW DE NTAL STAFF PHOTO B Y JORGE SOSA BELLYING UP T O THE BAR AT HARD TIMES I N STEWART Mo nday were staffe rs, from left, Kim Bacon, John Nie sen, Eric and Ba rb Koester, and c us- tomer Daryl Riek e. In keeping wit h the bar and re staurant’s frugal theme, Niesen m ade bar stools fr om car seats. Rachael Popp Hutchinson native will help “sell” others on her hometown WHAT’S INSIDE: Record A 2 News A3, A1 0 Opinion A 4 Faith/News A 5 Community A 6 Public Notice/ Classifi eds A8–A 9 Sports B1–B3, B 6 JCC Winterfest B4–B 5 Education B 7 County B 8 A publication of HOW TO REACH US Phone: 507-847-3771 E-mail: inf [email protected] m Fax: 507-847-5822 Web: www.jacksonco untypilot.com 121ST YEAR/ISSUE 5 THURSDAY, FEBRUA RY 3, 2011 See EXPANSION on A3 Photo courtesy of AGCO /Broadhead Co. Eric Fisher (front le ft), director of opera tions at AGCO-Jack son, and Bob Crain, senior vice presiden t and general manager of AGCO- North America, seal the deal for a majo r expansion of manu facturing operations at Jackson with a handshake la st Thursday, as state ag commissioner Da ve Frederickson (bac k left) and local stat e Sen. Doug Magnus applaud. by JUSTIN R. LESSM AN Publisher After helping to ush er in the an- nouncement last we ek of hundreds of new jobs in Jackso n as a result of a planned expansion at AGCO, Gov. Mark Dayton this w eek pegged the community as one of more than 300 targets for further job creation as a re- sult of proposed critic al infrastructure improvements. Since his inaugural address last month, the governor has repeatedly said his top priority i s to get Minne- sotans working again, arguing that job creation and econom ic development are the keys to diggi ng the state out of the economic dold rums. As of late, by JUSTIN R. LESSM AN Publisher It was a team effor t of citywide, countywide, statewi de — even na- tionwide — proport ions that led to last week’s announce ment of a major expansion of manuf acturing opera- tions at AGCO in Jac kson. From members of the Jackson Economic Develop ment Corp. to the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Em ployment and Economic Developm ent, from the Jackson City Counci l to Minnesota’s governor and represe ntatives in Con- gress, and from the line workers at AGCO-Jackson Op erations to the company CEO, the d ecision to move the manufacturing a nd assembly of several models of tra ctors to Jackson was the result of six months of hard work and dedication from countless groups and individua ls — with Jack- son as the starting po int. “So many people we re involved in the process,” Sue P irsig, Jackson’s economic developm ent coordinator and coordinator of the JEDC, said Monday, four days af ter company of- ficials made news of the impending expansion official wit h an announce- ment ceremony in Jackson. “And much of the work and effort was done on a volunteer basis — local people working hard for the benefit of this community. I say J ackson’s doing something right.” AGCO officials cert ainly thought so, rewarding all tha t hard work by so many with plans t o break ground in mid-May on a 75, 000-square-foot addition to its tractor assembly facility that will extend the a ssembly line by 125 feet and allow for construction of a 17,000-square-foot state-of-the-art visitor center, featur ing a showroom and theater. More than 100 per manent jobs TEAMWORK GETS IT DONE Photo by Mike Jordan Gov. Mark Dayton was all smiles last Thursday as he helped usher in more than 100 new p ermanent jobs at AGCO in Jackson. Jackson emerging as corn erstone of governor’s job creation eff ort it seems Jackson is t he epicenter of his efforts. “The best way to dig us out of the chronic budget deficit s facing the state of Minnesota is to get people working and paying taxes,” th e governor told a roomful of reporte rs during an ad- dress at the annual co nvention of the Minnesota Newspap er Association last Thursday in Blo omington, just prior to boarding a p lane to Jackson. Dayton said he was confident in his fellow citizens’ ability to band together to “fulfill t he commitment we all share to puttin g the people of Minnesota back to w ork.” Hours later, Dayton was in Jack- son to help announc e the expansion See JOBS on A3 Partners in progress The support of count less individuals, agen cies and organization s was critical to Jacks on landing the much sought- after AGCO facility ex pansion, said Sue Pir sig, Jackson’s econom ic development coor dinator and coordina tor of the spearheading Jackso n Economic Developm ent Corp. Key to assem bling the winning eco nomic development package were the following: “I want to give credi t to my pre- decessor, Gov. Paw lenty, and his administration, the Department of Employment an d Economic Development … cit y officials, the county — everyon e who pulled together and work ed so hard to put together an eco nomic devel- opment package t hat will keep jobs and add jobs f or the benefit of this part of the st ate and for all of Minnesota.” Mark Dayton Minnesota governor “Bringing jobs b ack to the heartland is an exa mple of what we can do when we work together to revitalize our loca l, rural econo- mies.” Tim Walz U.S. Congressman “It was great to see a ll the differ- ent groups of peopl e who worked together to get this done — from the local level on up to the state.” Wayne Walter Jackson mayor “So many people we re involved in the process. And much of the work and effort w as done on a volunteer basis — local people working hard for t he benefit of this community.” Sue Pirsig Jackson economic de velopment coordinator “This didn’t just ha ppen over- night. There was a lot of work ahead of time layin g the ground- work for this.” Rich Koch Former JEDC presiden t by JUSTIN R. LESSM AN Publisher City promoters this week are shifting their focus f rom creating jobs to creating home s. With the news last w eek of hun- dreds of new jobs o pening up in Jackson over the c ourse of the next year, city leader s on Monday expressed interest in making sure all those new employ ees live where they work. “That’s the hot topi c right now — the real big questio n,” said Jack- son Mayor Wayne Wa lter. “I’m sure there will be much d iscussion lent to that over the nex t few months With jobs secure, h ow about them living h ere? and it’s some- thing we need to figure out for sure.” Sue Pirsig, the city’s eco- nomic devel- opment coor- d inator and coordinator of the Jackson Economic De- velopment Corp. — the group in- strumental in AGCO ’s decision to expand manufacturin g operations in Jackson — said t he JEDC has already engaged me mbers of the See HOUSING on A 3 Mayor Wayne Walter Local troops prepare for deployment by JUSTIN R. LESSM AN Publisher Jackson-based Nat ional Guard troops are among 2 ,400 Minnesota soldiers scheduled for a one-year deployment to the M iddle East be- ginning in May, par t of the state’s second-largest deplo yment of troops since World War II. The affected soldiers were notified late last month. The soldiers, mem bers of the Minnesota Army Na tional Guard’s Bloomington-based 1 st Brigade Com- bat Team, 34 th Infantry Division, w ill deploy on May 22 in s upport of Oper- ation New Dawn, the U.S. drawdown phase of Operation I raqi Freedom. “Soldiers of the 1 st Brigade Combat Team have demonst rated that they are a confident, cap able and ready force,” said Maj. G en. Rick Nash, adjutant general of M innesota. “I am honored that our Mi nnesota soldiers have been asked to t ake part in this historic mission.” The 1st Brigade Com bat Team, 34 th Infantry Division con sists of 29 units from 27 Minnesota c ommunities, in- cluding Jackson. The Minnesota sol- diers will play what m ilitary officials called an “important role in the final drawdown of U.S. fo rces from Iraq.” First Brigade Soldie rs, stationed in Kuwait, will provide base defense in Kuwait and perform route security operations in suppor t of U.S. forces throughout Iraq. See DEPLOYMENT on A3 Pilot ranked among top papers in state The Jackson County Pilot was hon- ored among the top n ewspapers in the state last week during the annual con- vention of the Minne sota Newspaper Association. The Pilot, Jackson County’s top source of local new s and informa- tion for the past 121 years, received major awards for ge neral reporting and sports reportin g. News editor Ryan Brinks was also recognized indi- vidually for an in-dep th analysis news article that ran in th e Oct. 15, 2009, edition of the Pilot. Pilot staff members received the awards Thursday eve ning in Bloom- ington during the annual Better Newspaper Contest A wards Banquet, a gala event annually s ponsored by the MNA, an organizati on representing nearly 370 newspaper s across the state of Minnesota. In recognizing the P ilot for excel- lence in general re porting, judges commented: “This p aper is loaded with stories that matt er to its readers. See PILOT on A3 AGCO-JACKSON EXP ANSION • Gov. Tim Pawlenty and Gov. Mark Dayton • State Sens. Jim Vick erman and Doug Magnus • State Rep. Rod Ham ilton • State Rep. Bob Gun ther • U.S. Sen. Amy Klob uchar • Jackson County Co mmissioners Loren Tusa, Roger Rin gkob, Bill Tusa, Dave Henkels, R osemary Schultz and Kim Hum mel • Jackson Mayor Mit ch Jasper and Mayor Wayne Walter • Jackson City Counc il Members Jerry Palmer, Tom Am brose, Ed Willett, Fred Bern, Ga ry Willink, Ken Temple and Chris Vee • Southwest Initiativ e Foundation • Iowa Great Lakes C orridor • Sanford Health • Minnesota West Co mmunity and Technical College • Federated Rural Ele ctric Cooperative • Lakefi eld Mayor Da rrell Nissen • Jackson Area Cham ber of Commerce • Jackson County Ce ntral Schools • Minnesota Departm ent of Employment and Eco nomic Development Source: Jackson Econ omic Development C orp. The first operation is scheduled for this w eek by RYAN BRINKS News Editor The new, state-of-th e-art operat- ing suite at Sanford Medical Center Jackson was first sc heduled to be put to use Tuesday after months of renovation. A brand new lapa roscope, en- doscope, arm boar d for shoulder operations, added equipment for orthopedic and pod iatric services and electronic medic al records for all the charting in the su rgical suite are among the most prom inent upgrades, along with space. “We’ve about double d the size of our old surgical sui te,” said Dawn Schnell, chief nursing officer. Staff moved out of th e old operat- ing room at the end o f June 2010 but work didn’t actually s tart on the new suite until September . They were tem- porarily housed in th e old obstetrics area, where they pe rformed minor surgical cases and en doscopies. Now with the latest an d best equip- ment, the still-being -built team can Sanford Jackson debuts new surgical suite See SANFORD on A 3 Cheer team fi nishes third at state The Jackson County C entral varsity compet ition cheerleading team finished third a t the state competitio n Saturday and the elementary team fini shed second. Story, B1 Rutt is ranked third i n the nation Former Jackson Cou nty Central wrestler Travis Rutt is ranked third in the na tion while wrestling fo r the University of Wisconsin Badgers . But he’s not the only former Husky ranked collegiately. Story, B1 Sanford Medical Ce nter Jackson’s new s urgical suite was sch eduled to debut this week under the direction of team members (from left ) Deanna Smith, a r egistered nurse; Daw n Schnell, chief nursing officer; Michele Storbeck, op erating room manag er; Linda Winkelman , circulator; and Liz Nielsen, scr ub technician. Photo by Ryan Brin ks The Aloha couple Jackson County Central seniors William Baker and Leslie Handzus were crowned king and queen Sunday during the Aloha- themed Winterfest 2011 coronation. Photo by Ryan Brin ks Newsstand $1.25 www.northfieldnews.com Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 8 Northfield Historical Society grows, 8B 8 Plans for Wabasha historic hotel, 3AGuggisberg resigns, 1B Northfield News [|xbIIGDJy00000lz[ Main Line: 507-645-5615 Newsroom: 507-645-1113Sports: 507-645-1111 8 Contact Us 8 Coming Up An adult club came to Owatonna. It set up business just off the interstate. Two North-field council members disagree on where such businesses should be located. 8 Deaths, 5A Find us on Facebook and become a fan. 8 Now on Facebook Northfield musician joins new band, 9A Carl Leidner, 75 Shane Meehan, 38 Shea Stremcha, 25 Take a video tour of the new-and-improved Scriver Build-ing, the home of the Northfield Historical Society. N On the Web A1A1 507-645-44781201 South Hwy. 3, Northfield“Northfield’s only locally owned new car dealership.” See Our EntireInventory of New & Pre-Owned at Dokmo.com Always Not ONE PRICE PriceYour open & closed TIMING RESTAURANTS IN NORTHFIELD 2004 1947 July 2010 2005 2004 Sept. 2010 2009 Jan. 2008 Feb. 2010 2008 Mar. 2011 2005 July 2011 Erbert & Gerbert’s Subs and Clubs Tiny’s Hot Dogs Tea Creations Froggy Bottoms River Pub Wendy’s Pan Pan International Café Butler’s Steak and Ale Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Kentucky Fried Chicken Ole Café 620 Grill Bittersweet Eatery Bittersweet Eatery March 2010 July 2010 in operation Sept. 2010 2010 in operation Nov. 2010 Jan. 2011 Jan., 2011 Feb., 2011 in operation June, 2011 in operationNorthfield News Graphic by Joni Berg Why do Northfield’s restaurants FAIL? Five reasons we can’t keep them in business WHY CAN’T WE GET A CHIPOTLE?REQUIREMENTS AND GENERAL LOCATION NEEDS• Urban and suburban with strong residential and daytime population. • Preferred generators include residential, office, retail, university, recreation and hospitals PREFERRED SITE CRITERIA• Urban storefronts, shopping center end-caps and pads, freestanding buildings • Current sizes range from 1,000 to 2,800 square feet depending on trade area characteristics• 25 feet minimum frontage• Patio seating preferred • Zoning to accommodate restaurant use and allow liquor license (beer & margaritas)• Parking adequate for restaurant use• Building exterior to allow Chipotle standard storefront design and signage• Excellent visibility and access BACK IN BUSINESS? The National Restaurant Association forecasts a positive growth for the nation in 2011, after three years of negative sales growth. According to its 2011 Restaurant Industry Forecast, our region is expected to see a 3.1 percent growth in sales this year.In food services and drinking places, Rice County employed, on average: 1781 in 2006 1967 in 2007 1332 in 2008 1585 in 2009 Progress Northfield News 2011 A rollercoaster year in Northfield Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 Portraits Northfield News 2011 Saturday-Sunday, July 23-24, 2011 2131 in 2010* *Fourth quarter data not yet available, average of Q1 through Q3 — Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Quarterly Workforce Indicator — Source: Chipotle.com INSERTED IN THIS ISSUE By JACQUELINE A. [email protected] We’ve all had the same conversation.“What restaurant used to be there?” If you’ve been in Northfield long, it isn’t easy to recall all of the past and present restaurants in town. There has been a lot of movement in that sector in recent years. Behind each of those businesses are people who were willing to invest a lot of time, energy and of course, money, into their dream. Owners must juggle resources to keep each part of the business running smoothly, but consumers have to support them, too. Why can’t we — customers and entrepreneurs — keep them in business long-term? Business lessons Jennifer Torgrimson of Northfield had always been smart about her finances. She invested carefully and did her homework, but she knows now that frugality isn't always enough. See RESTAURANTS, 6AShutdown over: New budget cuts funding to schools, cities By SUZANNE ROOK, [email protected] and TIM PUGMIRE, MINNESOTa PUBlIc RadIO NEWS Gov. Mark dayton signed a series of budget bills Wednesday, ending a nearly three-week state government shutdown.Though Republicans passed the bud-get during a one-day special session, neither side has fully embraced the final product, which relies on borrowing and accounting measures. But both sides say they're glad the shutdown is over.dayton, who described the bills as the best option available, wanted an income tax increase on top earners, but Repub-licans refused. They eventually resolved the stalemate and resulting shutdown with a combination of tobacco bond bor- rowing and additional delayed state pay-ments to school districts.If the voters are angry about that, dayton said the blame falls squarely on the GOP. "I think the people of Minnesota should know that their preference is to borrow another $1.4 billion rather than raise taxes on millionaires and multi- millionaires,” dayton said. “They'll have to explain to the people of Minnesota why that is a better priority. I don't agree. I would not have voted for the tax bill if I were a legislator. But I signed it because otherwise Minnesota would not go back to work." Two of the area’s Republican legisla-tors, Rep. Kelby Woodard and Sen. al deKruif, see things differently.“I held my nose and voted for some-thing I don’t believe in,” deKruif said, ex-plaining his desire to get Minnesota back up and running. “This was the best deal the governor would agree to,” said Woodard.The deal shifts 40 percent of state aid payments to schools to the following year. Even with the planned repayment of a 30 percent shift from 2010-11, Northfield Superintendent chris Richardson says the district will receive $2.4 million less than it was promised in 2011-12. Rich-ardson says school officials will soon determine whether it needs to borrow to pay its bills. and that borrowing, he said, will cost the district money in the form of interest. charter schools will catch a break as the education bill assures they’ll be re-paid faster than non-charters.The upside, said Richardson, is that the education bill signed Wednesday no longer allows the state to temporarily withhold payments when it gets low on cash. Twice in the last couple of years, the Woodard Dekruif Dayton See BUDGET, 10A By Suzanne [email protected] For years, whenever his family would gather in front of the television, Shea Stremcha would be focused on his sketchbook. as they watched TV, S t r emc h a’s father, Jeff S t r e m c h a said, his y o u n g e s t son would be drawing, filling one bound pad after another with an array of images: designs, cars, creatures, people. Family and friends say Stremcha, 25, wasn’t just creative, but that he also overflowed with energy and enthusiasm. “He had a zest for life,” Jeff Stremcha said of his son who was shot and killed early Wednesday in an apparent home invasion at the south Minneapolis home he shared with his fiancée, ashley Faeth. On Friday, police arrested a 23-year-old man and a 27-year-old man in connection with the 2004 Northfield High School graduate’s death. The two were booked into Hennepin county Jail where they wait for investigators to take their case to the county attorney for possible charges.Police haven’t speculated on what motivated the killing. Jesse Stremcha, the oldest of the Stremcha siblings, remembers his brother as a young man who loved motorcycles and cars — especially a 1979 Trans am nicknamed “The Bandit” that he restored. along with their father, the two brothers enjoyed visiting the North Shore, hiking on the Superior Trail and annual motorcycle trips. Recently the three rode to Memphis, Tenn. Police arrest 2 in Northfield man’s death See ARREST, 5A Stremcha
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 30 Business Story CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE All Dailies–42 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times, Adam Couzens Healthful investments Making business coverage interesting, informative and useful to a mass audience is one of the challenges facing newspapers today. By merging the business of health with human-interest factoids and wellness - a popular topic these days, this piece accomplishes that. The liberal use of breakout boxes, graphics and pictures helps break up the text into manageable chunks. The article also effectively uses numbers to help tell the story of why it makes sense for businesses and employees to embrace wellness programs. Adding a piece that many newspapers forget, the story also shows people how to get involved and where they can go to get additional information. In all, a very timely, well thought-out and designed story. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Marino Eccher Ghosts in the stones Often, business coverage is thought of as a number-based pursuit that has to be forward looking. This piece by Marino Eccher breaks that mold, taking a romantic and fact-fueled look back at the businessmen - and the buildings - that helped shape and grow Fargo. And that there’s hardly a number in the story does little to diminish its business-centric nature. The graphic elements on the front - from the nontraditional headline to the mugs of the historic buildings, and the map - immediately draw the reader in and give a sense of personality and identity to the story. The heavy use of historical facts and tidbits helps place the reader in an earlier time, while current references bring the old buildings to life. In all, a piece that transcends the usual stale nature of business coverage while still hitting the mark. Well done. { cover story } By Adam Couzens Special to the Times You only have to ask Co ld Spring Granite Co. Pres ident John Mattke what he di d on his last vacation to realize h ow much he values health and wel lness. In January, the 52-year- old climbed Africa’s highest peak, Mount Kilimanjaro, risi ng 19,341 feet above sea lev el in Tanzania. A lifelong fitness advoca te, Mattke is a driving force — with owner and CEO Patrick Alex- ander — behind Cold S pring Granite implementing a formal agenda to promote work site health and wellness. The program has been r un- ning for five years and w ill cost the company $58 per em ployee in 2011. And it is well worth the HEAlTHful InvESTMEnTS LocaL companies find th eir weLLness programs are paying off in savings, productivity 10 | roi | April -June 2011 Group motivatio n: Janet Jerzak (near) a nd other ING Direct emp loyees work out Feb. 23.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 31  Arts and Entertainment Story Weeklies up to 1,500–5 entries First Place: Blaine-Spring Lake Park Life, Elyse Kaner Dino Might Dino Might is one of the most unique stories I have read in a newspaper. Both the medium Estrada uses and Kaner’s approach to the story are wonderful. Second Place: Ely Timberjay, Scott Stowell Art from the earth Interesting story about a creative community art program. Not your typical A & E story. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–19 entries First Place: Pelican Rapids Press, Louis Hoglund Drums across the millennia The writer put the extra time and effort into this piece and it shows. Great work. Congratulations! Second Place: The Paynesville Press, Michael Jacobson Frank and Nat: Their Way Nice writing grabbed the judge’s attention. Honorable Mention: The Paynesville Press, Michael Jacobson The Love of Music Excellent writing made the difference in this story. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–21 entries First Place: Litchfield Independent Review, Brent Schacherer Comin’ home to play A very colorful look at an entire era of music—and what happens after musicians grow up. Second Place: Waconia Patriot, Todd Moen The Carnival Life A layer of mystique is removed from the carnival worker. An interesting angle to take on an annual rite of passage—that can easily lead to the same story year after year. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  S E N T E R T A I N M E N T FRIDAY DEC. 17, 2010 B SECTIONARTS e is neither faster th an a speeding bullet nor can he leap tall building in a single bound. B ut Da- vid Estrada is most certainly a man of s teel. A man who carries a torch for art. An ox ygen acety- lene torch. Estrada is emerging as a popular steel sc ulpture artist in his own right. Pro of be told, someone from Madison, Wis., recently purch ased one of his mam moth dinosaurs. Other people from a s far away as China own his pieces. “I always tell people , some day when I g row up, I want to be an artist, ” Estrada said from his home in Ham Lake where he enjoys a detached s tudio in his backyard. Estrada, 51, a man w ith a salt- and-pepper fu manc hu moustache complemented by a full head of white hair that be lies his age, makes dinosaurs. Bi g dinosaurs. Lumbering allosaur uses. Sixteen- feet long stegosauru ses. Out of steel. Meanwhile, his fl am ing red- head woodpeckers a nd delicate eagle feathers – all f orged of steel – are some of his best sellers. So are his waist-high blue h erons. Blue, you say? Steel? Yes, blue. Estrada manages to conjure a pal- ate of hues on his fi n ely detailed steel art pieces, depe nding on the heat intensity of his torch on metal. He came from a lin e of blacksmiths Estrada has gone fro m creating ants and butterfl ies out of washers, bolt s and railroad spikes to turning ou t eight-feet tall sunfl owers, with pet- als made of dappled steel, an effect he ge ts from hammer on anvil techniques. A craft not too far r emoved from the lon g line of blacksmiths in his fa mily. That would be his grandfather and great grandfath er on his dad’s side. Also, his father was a metal polisher by trade. Oh, yeah. Estrada c rafts miniature moto rcycles from steel as well. They h ang, more than thre e-feet in length, on his studio walls l ooking as if they’re ready to thunder off onto an open hig hway. One of his favorite p ieces, a 14-feet high steel sculp- ture refl ecting his N ative American heri tage, rises above Kaposia Park in Sou th St. Paul. The piece, commissi oned by the River E nvironmental Action Program, be speaks symbolism. A circle for the earth. Two brothers for the Dakota and Lakota tribes. They hold a drum, representing the hea rt beat of the Sioux. A bison for f ood. An eagle, the carrier of prayer s. Four feath- ers representing the four direc- tions, north, south, east and west. Estrada fi nished the sculpture in 2007. He has been t apped to do two more projects in the park. Not bad for a kid w ho in the late ‘70s fl unked his entrance exam into St. Paul’s Techn ical Voca- tional Institute. Not bad for a kid w ho grew up in a tough neighbor hood in south Minneapolis, where he faced ethnic challenges. “I was an outsider a nd I had to fi ght everybody,” sa id Estrada, who laughs easily and ex udes a certain calmness and satisfa ction with his life today. He’s been working since the age of 12 Things changed for the better when his family mov ed to Champlin. He was an eighth-gr ader at the time. He made new friend s. Friends from Jackson Junior High whom he still gets together with n early every week. His mother Kathlee n Estrada recalls he r son, the eldest of three boys and a younger sister , starting a paper route at the ag e of 12. He was a re sponsible kid who baby sat for peo ple on his route, she said. And he’s been working ev er since. In junior high, he br oke a track record a nd in high school he was a spri nter and played foot ball, but he wasn’t into art, she s aid. He did, however, tak e a cake decorating class. “What impressed m e is he could make b eautiful, beautiful roses,” she said. “They were so real, they didn’t look like frost ing.” Estrada knew at the early age of 13 that he wanted to be a pipe fi tter. While attendin g Anoka High School, he too k a preparatory cou rse to get into St. Paul’s TVI. But he failed the ent rance exam. He aske d for tutoring. None w as available. He con tacted the Bureau of India n Affairs. No luck. Hardly one to give u p, Estrada got in touch with the St. P aul Urban League. T hey supported African-A mericans. Maybe th ey would help. But, at the time, they had n o programs for Estrad a, a mix of Mexican and Lower Sioux (o f the Minnewaukan Tribe) on his mothe r’s side and Swedish and Mexican on his father’s side. Still, at the age of 17 , the league answere d Estrada’s call for help. He esti mates the league spe nt about $1,000 to tutor him for two -and-a-half months, mostly, on math and spacial percepti on. “That’s $1,000 that they invested in me as a kid,” Estrada said. “I’ve b een a productive wo rker ever since then.” A pipe fi tter and an artist Today, Estrada is a p ipe fi tter foreman fo r Northern Air Corporation of Vadnais Heights. Bu t innately, he is an artist. Always str iving for perfection. After graduating fro m Anoka High Scho ol in 1977, Estrada not only rea lized his dream of b ecoming a pipe fi tter at the age of 1 9, he later earned a master’s pipe fi t- ter license. He work ed at several differen t union jobs, the Monticello and Pra irie Island Nuclear P ower Plant, the Ashland Refi nery. In the mid 1980s, he suffered a knee inju ry at work. A six-inch pipe fell fro m a stand and hit hi s knee. He was unable to work for t wo years. He later returned to a job at the St. Pau l sewer plant. After a time, Estrad a had had enough. The job held no cha llenges for him. “And that’s what go t me into the artwor k,” Estrada said of his water tre atment plant job. “I hated it. It was a boring job. It was just dry toast. The p roduct you’re dealing with gave m e no satisfaction.” At about the same ti me, in 1989, he start ed attending art shows at museum s with his wife, Jeani e. They visited the Walker Art Cent er. The Minneapolis Institute of Arts. “He always would s ay to me, gosh, I cou ld do that,” said Jeanie, Estrada ’s wife of 21 years a nd a former art teacher. Estrada was 31 at th e time. He started o ff simple. Us- ing his welding expe rtise with an oxygen acetylene torch, he joined metal shap es. He made large an ts from railroad spikes and nails. He made fantasy birds Jeanie refers to as Goonie birds. The body of the bir d from a metal shovel scoop, and a hoe handle for the h ead. So why does he use an old-school oxyge n acetylene torch for his sculptu res? “If you use a compu ter plasma machine, that’s not art. That cheats the system,” he says. Besides the plasma c utters spew a fi ne powder he has n o interest in inhaling, he says. He wanted to make a dinosaur About eight years a go Estrada took a drive around the Lake of the Isles and spotted a monstrous metal dinosaur. It was in front of on e of the homes, and, well, th e rest is his- tory. Ancient histor y. Jurassic Period history. “I came home and t old my wife I want to make a dinosaur.” “OK, Hon, go for it ,” she said. “It was just one way of getting me out of her hair,” Estrada says, jokingly. His fi rst attempt at c reating the mammoth creatures took nine months. He studied children’s illustrated books an d drew up plans for a template . Accuracy was important to hi m. W W W .A B C N E W S P A P E R S .C O M I believe implicitly th at every young man i n the world is fascina ted with either shar ks or dinosaurs – Peter Benchley (American author of novel “Jaws,” 19 40-2006) David Estrada crea tes dinosaurs of steel, some weighing more tha n 700 pounds. This stego sau- rus nestles in front of his Ham Lake home. (Photo by Elyse Kaner) I always tell people, some day when I grow up, I want to be an artist, “ ”- David Estrada Estrada uses an ox ygen acetylene torc h to create his art pie ces. (Photo by Bruce S ilcox) ota and m, e le, h- t. n am up th nic to who in his r mplin. ime. om If you use a comput e art. T Be fi n in He too the m h to P w “ me o jokin H m m il p w Estrada was commis sioned to create this statue refl ecting his Native American heritage. The statue stands in Kaposia Pa rk in South St. Paul. (Photo courtesy of Davi d Estrada) DINOmight/ continued on page 6 By ELYSE KANER | ST AFF WRITERyy ||| Courtesy Otter Tail County Historical Society Many local residents haveforgotten, but Pelican Rapidsrates a prominent place instate history and there is amonument commemoratingthe event just 3 miles north ofthe city on U.S. Highway 59.A monument stands on thesite of the discovery of "TheMinnesota Woman" the skele-tal remains of a woman that isbelieved to be at least 10,000(possibly as much as 20,000)years old.It was June 16, 1931 and ahighway department crew wasat work leveling what engi-neers had labeled "frost boilfive" when the grader bladesuddenly bit into soft earth.Crew member Carl Steffen,who was following themachine, thought he sawsomething odd. Stopping fora closer look, he was shockedto see an empty eye socket ofa human skull peering up athim. "We had this tough old guywho came over and said, 'thiswon't take long!' and jammedhis shovel into the ground.But I warned him away fromit. 'We'll make a man out ofit,' I said,’” Mr. Steffenrecalled. Steffen indeed tried to"make a man out of it," byexhuming the bones, and lay-ing them out in anatomicalorder in the ditch. Today such an unintentionaldiscovery of human remainswould stop a project cold,while experts were hustled into make a thorough evalua-tion of the undisturbed site.But this was 1931 and inter-estingly enough, the boneslay there overnight untilretrieved by the district super-visor who eventually gotthem to Dr. Albert Jenks fromthe University of Minnesota,while the road work contin-ued. At least two artifacts -- aconch shell pendant and a dag- ger made from an elks' horn -- were discovered with thebones. It did not take Jenks and hiscolleagues long to realize theyhad a find of immense impor- tance. The pelvis immediatelyidentified it as a maturefemale, but young enough tonever have borne children.From Steffens description ofhow the bones lay, expertsreasoned they had not been rit-ualistically buried, so an acci-dental death was suspected.The bones had been coveredwith a layer of deterioratedclam or mussel shells.That layer of shells provedextremely troublesome -- aninconvenient piece in the sci-entific puzzle -- for it indicat-ed death by drowning. Perhapsshe had broken through thinice, or perhaps she had beenfishing and had fallen from alog or crude raft. Then herbody had sunk into the mudand had slowly been covered with other layers of silt andsand. There had been no waterthere for at least 10,000 years,when glacial Lake Pelicanincluded all the lakes in thePelican River Chain, and cov-ered considerable high ground,as well. And the soil coveringthe body had been laid downcenturies before that. In fact,the lake had been formed bythe melting of the great gla-ciers which covered most ofour continent long ages ago.Prior to 1926, most scien-tists believed human beings'appearance in North Americadated from about the last cou-ple thousand years. The dis-covery of what was to becomeknown as "The MinnesotaMan" (the name officiallychanged in 1976 to "The Min-nesota Woman") pushed thedate even beyond that, backfurther than many were will-ing to concede.But eventually, the evidencebecame irrefutable. Sciencenow recognizes this Minneso-ta Girl (who is sometimesreferred to as "Lady of theLake"), as a proto-Indian, amember of a race who livedvirtually in the shadow of gla-ciers at the end of the last IceAge. Her forebears had comefrom east-central Asia, per-haps by walking across theBering Straights on ice, per-haps on a "land bridge"exposed by lower sea levels.Retreating glaciers left a bandof rich alluvial soil at theirbases, upon which grew lushgrasses to feed great herds ofbison, elk, perhaps woolymammoths, as well. Thus Otter Tail Countymay claim to have been thehome of one of the firsthuman beings to have livedon the North American conti-nent during the PleistoceneEpoch age. If scientists arecorrect, this Pelican Rapidsteenage girl dates back beyondthe days of the Pharoahs ofEgypt, and beyond the writtenhistory of humanity. TH E RESSP Page 8 March 23, 2011 Drums across the millennia multi-cultural, musical, historical and creativecomponents.“This is really exclusive to PelicanRapids,” said Pelican High School banddirector Sean Fitzsimmons, who has whole-heartedly supported the project. “It is an interesting collaboration, and thestudents participated in all of the creativeaspects,” said Tessa Martinson, director ofthe multi-school Cultural Collaborative thatis centered around Pelican Rapids. Partners also include: •The White Earth Indian Reservation anddrummer Tom Mason•The Fargo-Moorhead Youth Symphony•Pelican Rapids High School Music Depart-ment •Otter Tail County Historical Society•The McKnight FoundationTo top it off, the program has been a per-fect fit with the Pelican school's 21st Centurygrant, which provides after-school learningand enrichment opportunities. Pure coincidence, or perhaps destiny,brought all of these partners together–via theinternet. “I really knew nothing about Minnesota,”said composer Nielson, who outlined hisproject earlier in the winter at a PelicanRapids Rotary meeting. His internet searches included words like“mythology, mystical, anthropology.”Appearing in his search was the historicalsociety’s story of the “Minnesota Woman.” The end result of these quirks of fate: Astory and ten minute composition will debutApril 3 at 4 pm at Festival Hall in theReineke Fine Arts Center, NDSU. An ensemble of Pelican Rapids drummerswill sit side by side with young musiciansfrom throughout Fargo-Moorhead to presentthe music and story. “Many of the students from Pelican Rapidsmay not have been exposed to drummingworkshops, and playing with a live sympho-ny orchestra before,” wrote Nielson, in anoverview of the project. “I feel that I will beable to bring a great musical background tothe students of Pelican Rapids, which willhelp bring awareness of contemporary livingcomposers, and inspire them to pursue musicin their own lives whether it be for a hobbyor career.”Surprisingly, Pelican Rapids students arealso learning about this fascinating aspect oflocal history. Despite the fact that there is apermanent monument to the discovery of the“Minnesota Woman” at a fork in the road onthe north side of Pelican–many local studentswere completely unaware. Any lack of knowledge of the MinnesotaWoman didn’t prevent their imaginationsfrom running wild, however. Caught in the crossfire between two clansbattling over limited resources, MinnesotaWoman was given a seashell pendant by her “Romeo” from the warring tribe. MinnesotaWoman, sometimes called “The Lady of theLake,” was discovered with at least two arti-facts: the pendant and a dagger made from anelk’s horn.The primitive knife was given to her tohelp protect her from the enemy tribe.There is a medicine man in the story, and inthe climactic conclusion, there is a chasescene across the lake, in a primitive canoe.Minnesota Woman drowns, despite a desper-ate attempt to save her. She is buried with herdagger and pendant–blanketed by a layer ofmussel shells. A three movement composition, the musicincludes a love theme for the “Romeo andJuliet” of the story. A distinctive drumrhythm will represent each tribe, as Nielsonexplained. “The story was not my idea, it was totallythe students’ idea,” said Nielson, who wantedto tap into the students’ flair for the dramatic. “The students really helped in all aspects..increating a story line around the life of Min-nesota Woman,” said Cultural Collaborativedirector Martinson. And in the process, these students preservedthe essence of pre-historic Minnesota;enhanced by mankind’s most fundamentalmusical instruments; and inspired by an age-less story, penned by a master of the Englishlanguage: Shakespeare.Truly, the April 10 premiere of “Minnesota Woman” will be a historic origi-nal. Ojibwa of White Earth and the Sioux ofSouth Dakota, Mason has served as an advisorfor the “Minnesota Woman” project. As important as rhythm were Mason’s les-sons on drum tradition and protocol. “Drums are one of the most treasured giftsyou can ever have,” said Mason to the stu-dents. “While a drum is in your care...takecare of it as if it were a child; a living per-son.” Drums can have a female spirit, or a malespirit; and may take on the soul of an ani-mal–elk, deer, bison. A “drum-keeper” in his community,Mason’s father carried on the tradition of hisgrandfather–and ancestors before. In the 1920’s, his grandfather performed at“Native American Expositions.” “We couldn't even call them ‘Pow Wows,’”said Mason, because of the government’s gen-eral Native American policies of assimilation,which essentially banished many Indian tradi-tions from public display. “You could not openly sing and have PowWows...They would hold them illegally in thebackwoods. Then, headlights would form in acircle around the Pow Wow, and it would beraided,” said Mason, recounting his grandfa-ther’s stories. “Many times, he had to jumpinto his Model A Ford and make a run forit.”.” ‘Minnesota Woman’ April 3 concertpremiere will position Pelican Rapidsarea, students at center stage NATIVE AMERICAN DRUMMER continued from page 1 MINNESOTA WOMANcontinued from page 1 Native American drummer Tom Mason, right, during a workshop at the Pelican Rapids school. Background, from left, Keirsten Markgraf, Keidra Anderson, Chloe Evenson, Esther Saavedra, Cultural Coordinator Tessa Martinson, Trudy Johnson, McKnight Visiting Composer David Nielsen, Chantall Foss and Ashley Phan. McKnight Visiting Composer David JamesNielson, above, working as an artist in resi-dence in Pelican Rapids. Creating percussion sounds during a workshop earlier thiswinter, at the Pelican RapidsHigh School band room is student Ashley Neu. The premiere of 'Minnesota Woman' by James DavidNielsen, featuring Pelican Rapids students performing withthe Fargo-Moorhead Area Youth Symphony will be April 3,4 p.m. at Festival Hall in the Reineke Fine Arts Center,NDSU. FMAYS provides the young musicians of the Red RiverValley and the surrounding region with the experience ofrehearsing and performing with a symphony orchestra.FMAYS has been serving the orchestral growth of youthsince the late 1960's. Minnesota Woman:Oldest resident of North America discovered in Pelican Rapids in 1931 This skull, dating back 10,000years or more, was discov-ered north of Pelican Rapidsin 1931. Below, the monu-ment at the site of the discov-ery. Editor’s Note: We all have heritage, history and rootssomewhere else on the planet–and nowhere is this as evi-dent as Pelican Rapids. This article focuses on one of the many educational pro-grams offered through the multi-school “CulturalCollaborative,” which is headquartered in Pelican Rapids. The Pelican Rapids Press will be publishing stories peri-odically about West Otter Tail County’s multi-cultural her-itage. These stories have included a variety of themes,from cultural programs at the school to profiles of immi-grants from the past to the present. Feature stories with a multi-cultural theme will appearperiodically in the Press over the next year. “Self-Made in America: A Bi- ography of Al- fred Anderson” is a biography, but it’s also a history of entre- peneurship and political life in Litchfield and Meeker County during the early to middle part of the 20th century, according to au- thor Steve Dille. By Andrew Wig STAFF WRITER Recent market con ditions have made scrap me tal an in- creasingly desirable target for thieves in Meeker Co unty and beyond. Enticing them has been near record-high met al prices. In recent weeks, R& R Auto Salvage and Recy cling in Litchfield was payi ng $4.15 per pound for the highest grade copper, up fro m the $1 per pound copper wa s getting in late 2008, althou gh prices have leveled off som e in the past two weeks, c oinciding with recent stock market volatility. “We’ve been experi encing metal thefts for the la st couple years, but there seem s to be a heightened interest in steal- ing copper and other metals,” Meeker County Sh eriff Jeff Norlin said. However, “we have m ade no arrests yet,” he adde d. Last year his office made one metal-theft ar rest, he said. The problem is, the items LITCHFIELD Darwin unwinds du ring city celebration ◆ 16A Girls ready to make a racket AUGUST 18, 20 11 SINCE 1876 $1 Vintage vehicles Independent ReviewIndependent Review SUBMITTED PHOTOS Mike Shaw, right, say s playing a Shaw-Alle n-Shaw reunion conce rt in Litchfield will be a special moment, co n- sidering that he and brother Terry, left, gr ew up here, and Jim A llen lived in the city for a long time. All th ree now live elsewhere — Mike in Hutchinson, T erry in Willmar and Ji m in Florida. Scrap metal thefts on the rise in Meeker County By Brent Schachere r EDITOR Litchfield sewer rat es will increase 4.1 percent i n 2012 to finance reconstructio n of the failed eastside trunk line, fol- lowing a unanimous decision Monday by the City C ouncil. Council members ap proved a bond sale bid and a construc- tion bid for the sewe r project, which carries a $1. 5 million price tag, and follow ed that with the decision to increase rates for all residen tial and commercial propert ies. The increase will apply to every- one, except the “redu ced rate” available to elderly r esidents. The rate increase as i t is ap- plied to First District Associa- tion, the city’s large st waste- water customer, als o will be mitigated somewhat by a re- turn to FDA of tax ab atement dollars from the dair y cooper- ative that had been going to the city’s Sewer Fun d. Trunk sewer reconst ruction became necessary wh en a por- tion of the eastside line col- lapsed between Ec onofoods and VFW/Hero’s on Precision Drive. City enginee rs from Bolton & Menk de termined that some portions of the line, from the collapsed area to Fifth Street, will have to be ex- cavated and replaced . Most of the trunk, which had not col- lapsed or become mi sshapen, can be lined, which is a less ex- pensive option. The suggested rate in crease received unanimous a pproval, but only after a brie f discus- sion about the equity of rates. Ward 2 council m ember Connie Lies asked if commer- cial properties sh ould be judged all in one class, or Council raises sewer rates for 2012 By Brent Schachere r EDITOR Thir ty-five years is a long time, especially in th e music business. But the 1970s will se em a little less distant Saturday nig ht at the Meek- er County Fairgroun ds, as the Shaw- Allen-Shaw band reu nites for a mu- sical walk down mem ory lane as part of the Backyard Ban d, Brew & BBQ fundraiser for the L itchfield Opera House. The band’s namesa kes — Mike Shaw, Jim Allen and Terry Shaw — are viewing the reun ion concert with a mixture of trepidati on and anticipa- tion. But while much has changed since the band’s heyday, w hen it set ball- room attendance rec ords and record- ed two albums, the m usical bond re- mains the same. Jus t to be sure, the group gathered for a few pre-concert rehearsals during th e past week. “I’m nervous. It will b e like my first day of school or so mething,” Terry Shaw said. “But Ji m said to me, ‘We’ve just got to g et through that first song’ ... that old s aying about rid- ing a bike, you know ?” The ride Shaw-Allen -Shaw took all those years ago was no pedal-pow- ered promenade, how ever. Their rise was more like a nitr o-boosted rocket ride that brought the m regional fame and a decent income . Though band membe rs still seem a bit unsure of just h ow they caught Comin’ home to play The Shaw-Allen-Sha w band will reunite fo r its first concert in 35 years. The forme r Litchfield brothers a nd friend, who recorde d two albums and ear ned numerous awards, will perform Saturday a t the fairgrounds as p art of a fundraiser for t he Litchfield Opera Ho use. Funds from increase will pay for fixing failed trunk line on east side of Litchfield See SEWER on Page 6ASee CONCERT on Pa ge 2A Sheriff’s Office seeks public’s help in finding thieves See METAL on Page 7A Jim Allen teamed up with brothers Mike Shaw and Terry Shaw to form Shaw-Allen-Shaw, on e of the region’s most popular bands in the 1970s. The trio played their first gig on a Friday night at the American Legi on club in Litchfield. By Brent Schachere r EDITOR The back cover of “S elf-Made in America: A Biograph y of Alfred An- derson” offers a gli mpse of a re- markable man: from Swedish immi- grant to founder of An derson Chem- ical to mayor of Litch field. But page through th e book’s 179 pages, and a deeper understanding develops of Anderson , one of Litch- field’s early entrepre neurs. “Why would anyone want to buy this book?” co-author Steve Dille of Dassel asks rhetoric ally. “Well, the way I look at it, her e’s a guy who came here as a 14-ye ar-old Swedish immigrant with noth ing, all by him- self, with no family support. Fifty- two years later, he p asses away ... and I believe he was o ne of the more significant citizens in this county in that half-century.” Dille, a former state senator, ad- mitted he might be m ore than a lit- tle biased. After all, Anderson was his grandfather. That family link gav e him access to information that others might have had a difficult time finding. But there was no nee d to embellish Anderson’s life histo ry when facts so clearly illustrate his impact on the area. It’s a history closely t ied to Ander- son Chemical Co., w hich will cele- brate its 100th anniv ersary with an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at company headqu arters at 325 Davis Ave. S., Litchf ield. “I’m pleased this bo ok was completed and pub- lished in the centen nial year of Anderson Che mi- cal Company,” said D ille, who wrote the majo rity of the book, using let- ters, newspaper c lip- pings and other sour ces meticulously collec ted by his mother and co- author, Bonnie And er- son Dille, who died in 2006. Anderson Chemical c elebrates 100th anniv ersary BACK THEN 6 B BULLETIN BOARD 5 B CLASSIFIEDS 13 A COMMUNITY 1 B CROSSWORD 6 B FAITH 4 B KIDS CORNER 6 B LOCAL 3 A OBITUARIES 6 A OPINION 4 A PEOPLE 2 B PUBLIC NOTICES 10 A RURAL LIVING 3 B SPORTS 8 A WHAT’S INSIDE : HOW TO REACH US E-mail: [email protected] ntreview.net [email protected] ntreview.netTelephone: (320) 693-3 266 Fax: (320) 693-9177 The Meek- er County Sheriff’s Of- fice has seen an increase in thefts of metal, in- cluding cop- per. The Sheriff’s Of- fice asks for the public to notify them if they see unknown people or vehicles, especially in the evening, near places where equipment is left out side. Diggin’ Twine Ball Day Antique Car Run travels through cou nty ◆ 1B New book honors Al fred Anderson who foun ded the Litchfield busine ss in 1911; company p lans open house on Frida y See ANDERSON on P age 7A Litchfield tennis tea m returns seven senior starter s ◆ 8A
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 32 Weeklies over 5,000–19 entries First Place: Edina Sun Current, Katie Mintz Hymn-a-Thon raises money for organ repairs The perfect example of how writing makes the story just as much as the story itself. Great lede grabs the reader and has him laughing, great use of quotes throughout. The writing invites the reader along for the story of the organ while also making sure to include the whos, whats, whens and wheres of the event itself. Other entries in the category had much stronger stories to tell, but the writer didn’t give those stories the reverence this writer did. Second Place: St. Louis Park Sun Sailor, Seth Rowe Emotional journey on film This was a tough film to do, and the writer did a great job with interviews to tell the story thoroughly, but with the cadence to match the filmmaker and the family’s story of secrets and death. Caused me to Google the story to find out even more, hoping to see the movie. All Dailies–36 entries First Place: The Bemidji Pioneer, Laurie Swenson Zombies turning out in Bemidji Fun and informative look at what is probably a unique event in Bemidji - a film shoot! (Great art, too.) Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Shane Mercer Rednecks Great preview of a popular comedy show, and Q & A with comedian Bill Engvall, that also helps to answer the question, why is ‘redneck’ comedy so popular? Honorable Mention: Duluth News Tribune, Christa Lawler Is cost of concert tickets too high? This story tries to answer a question that baffles so many, and looks to ticket scalping as a new (to Duluth) phenomenon that is the likely culprit. Arts and Entertainment Story CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE SUN CURRENT EDINA � FEBRUARY 1 0, 2011 75¢ Vol. 34, No. 6 In the Community , With the Commu nity, For the Comm unity www.minnlocal .com Changes afoot for Southdale Simon Property Group looking to improve the ‘important property’ BY KATIE MINTZ • SUN NEW SPAPERS Southdale Cen ter, the nation’s first enclo sed regional shopping center, c ould soon get a facelift. Owner Simon Property Group is reporte dly in talks with a new anch or tenant as part of a major re development of the 55-year-old m all. Edina Mayor Jim Hovland and City Manage r Scott Neal spoke with Simon representa- tives by phone Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 2. Hovland said the Indianapolis-based retail real estate firm has a potential anchor tenant for the former Mervyn’s store vaca nt since 2004. “To hear them say they’re on the verge of findin g a tenant for a space that’s bee n empty for seven years is e ncouraging,” said Hovland. “I’ m hoping it comes to fruition.” The Hymn-a-Thon Sat urday, Feb. 5, at St. S tephen the Martyr Epis copal Church in Edina was expected to raise close to $10,00 0 toward a major res toration of the church’s pipe organ, sa id Larry Reynolds (cen ter), St. Stephen’s min ister of worship and principal organist. (Phot os by Katie Mintz • Sun New spapers) St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church restoring organ for 75th anniversary BY KATIE MINTZ • SUN NEW SPAPERS Things didn’t end well for the last pipe o rgan at St. Stephen the Mart yr Episcopal Church in Edina. “The other one blew up in the middle of a servic e,” said long- time parishioner A nn Marx. The church is ma king sure its replacement w ill accompa- ny services for ye ars to come. About 70 congr egation and community mem bers partici- pated in the nine-h our Hymn-a- Thon Saturday, Fe b. 5, to raise money for its main tenance. Larry Reynolds, m inister of worship and princ ipal organist at St. Stephen’s, s aid the origi- nal organ was a vi ctim of being St. Stephen’s organ wa s built in 1987 for the church’s 50th annivers ary. All 3,000 pipes will be cleaned th is spring as part of an e xtensive renovation lea ding up to the church’s 75th annivers ary. Here, Larry Reyno lds, St. Stephen’s mini ster of worship and principal organist, accompanies singers at the church’s Hymn-a -Thon. SOUTHDALE: TO PAGE 13 HYMN-A-THON: TO PAGE 14 Hymn-a-Thon raises money for organ repairs SPORTS Hornets hockey shuts out EP, falls to Wayzata PAGE 22 (952) 484-6045 [email protected] sHouses.com John Raichert Sells Home s (612) 701-7663 [email protected] ealty.com In Neighborhoods Lik e Yours! EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY REALTOR ® MLS® 5016 Richmond Drive � Move-In Ready � Newe r 2+ Car Garage $298, 000 Call John for a priva te showing.NOW OPEN IN EDINA!7101 France Ave. S • EDINA (Across from Byerly’s) 952-955-8228 OPEN 7 DAYS A W EEK! Good Morning,Harvey Roy of Cass Lake Thank you for subscribing Copyright 2010 Index Classifieds ......................13-14Comics ..................................15Dear Abby ................................2Obituaries................................3Opinion ....................................4Outdoors................................10Sports ..................................8-9Stocks......................................3Weather ..................................5 Friday October 29, 2010 114 Years Number 191 Today’s forecast High45º Low 30º See Page 5 SPORTS, PAGE 8 BSU men’s hockey team to face UMD OUTDOORS, PAGE 10 DNR sees good deerhunting season 75¢ Re-Elect State Representative John PersellContinued Trustworthy Leadership for Northern Minnesota www.johnpersell.com Paid for by Citizens for John Persell, P.O. Box 322, Bemidji, MN 56619 Rep. John Persell’s continued committment to District 4A : Create Jobs, Help Small BusinessesLower Property Taxes Quality Education from Early childhood,K-12 and Higher Ed Access to Affordable Healthcare,Standing up for our rural hospitals andnursing homes Protecting our natural resources To compare the candidates,watch the Lakeland Public Television Debate at www.lakelandptv.org R0 01 51 98 67 By Bethany WesleyPioneer Staff Writer If Zorbaz is looking for a friendlierCity Council next year when – or if –it requests a 2 a.m. bar closing time.It doesn’t seem overly likely.Candidates for Bemidji City Coun-cil, including mayor, were asked intheir debates Wednesday night howthey felt about a 2 a.m. bar closingtime. The current council voted 4-2 inFebruary to reject a request fromZorbaz owner Tom Hanson for a 2a.m. bar closing time.All three sitting council members –Jerry Downs, Roger Hellquist andRon Johnson – referenced the origi- nal vote about seven years ago,when the 2 a.m. bar closing time wasmade an option. No one really want-ed a later time, so the council decid-ed to stick with the 1 a.m. time.However, once Hanson requestedthe time change, it again became anissue. Hellquist and Johnson voted inFebruary to keep the 1 a.m. timewhile Downs was in the minoritywho were in favor of the 2 a.m. barclosing time. Did their positions change at all?Downs, running for re-election inWard 4, said the city needs to consid-er the idea as it could spur a landsale in the south shore and impactthe area’s economy. Hellquist, running for re-electionin Ward 2, said the downtown barsstill are not in favor of a later closingtime. However, he said, if there is a goodargument for a later bar closing, hewould be willing to listen to it.Johnson, the current Ward 3 coun-cilor now running for mayor, said hewas neither for it nor against, notingthat some bars don’t even stay openpast 11 p.m. on weeknights. Johnsonwondered if there was not a possiblecompromise where bars could per-haps stay open later on weekends.For those not on the council, noneseemed eager to push back the barclosing time. Richard “Dick” Sathers, running against Hellquist for Ward 2, said hisunderstanding is that the local barsdo not want a later closing.Rita Albrecht, running for Ward 4against Downs, said she did notknow how she would have voted. Shehas heard complaints that Bemidji isanti-business and this would, report-edly, help get a new business tocome to town. But she said she knewthe Bemidji Police Department wasnot in favor of a later closing.Dave Larson, running for mayor,said he did not know why someonewould need to drink even later andbelieved a 1 a.m. closing would beappropriate for this community. By Bethany WesleyPioneer Staff Writer There will be no recognitiontonight of the partnershipbetween the city of Bemidji andSanford Health, which is paying$2 million to have the BemidjiRegional Event Center renamedThe Sanford Center.A ceremony had been plannedto recognize the partnership dur-ing tonight’s Bemidji State Uni-versity hockey game against Uni-versity of Minnesota-Duluth, butthe ceremony – not the game –has been delayed. John Chattin, city manager,said there is no problem per se,but that the final agreement isnot ready. “We have a draft agreement,but that agreement has always been contingent on State of Min-nesota approval,” he said.Because the state Legislaturegave the city $23 million in bond-ing dollars toward the BREC, theagreements need to be approvedby the state. Chattin said Minnesota Man-agement & Budget is in charge ofthat review but has asked the lawfirm of Dorsey & Whitney to han-dle the review on the state’sbehalf. Meanwhile, the city’s own bondcounsel is reviewing the agree-ment because of the city’s $42million in bonds. Chattin explained that all useagreements, such as this, need tobe reviewed by the bondingauthority or authorities.There are requirements that must be met. For instance, if it was decidedto rent out one half of BemidjiCity Hall to a for-profit entity, theproperty could no longer be tax-exempt because it would notmeet IRS regulations.That is an example, not anexpectation of difficulties.“We don’t anticipate it being aproblem, but we do need to gothrough the process,” Chattinsaid. The city and Sanford Healthstill are in sync on the terms ofthe draft agreement. SanfordHealth will pay $2 million, spreadout throughout 10 years and ninemonths, which would equal a$200,000 payment each year. By Brad SwensonPioneer Political Editor The two candidates for Bel-trami County sheriff haveraised $35,000 for their warchests, according to cam-paign finance reports filedwith Beltrami County Audi-tor/Treasurer Kay Mack.Wadena County ChiefDeputy Bill Cross raisedabout $7,000 more than cur-rent Beltrami County SheriffPhil Hodapp, and Cross hasmore contributors of morethan $100 — 36 — thanHodapp — 14. The reports from the sher-iff ’s race overwhelm that ofthe only other BeltramiCounty government contest-ed race, that of county com-missioner for the 1st District.There, Commissioner JackFrost reports no contribu-tions and $757.17 in expenses.Challenger Sally Finedayreports $1,343 in contribu-tions and $889.41 in expenses.With $100 the threshold forreporting individual contri-butions, Fineday reportedfour such donors: Women-winning State PAC, St. Paul, BEMIDJI REGIONAL EVENT CENTER Naming rights work continues CHURCH GETS READY FOR DINNER Recognition ceremony for partnership delayed Pioneer Photo/Monte Draper Bernie Dow, left, and Dianne Roholt wrap silverware Thursday afternoon in preparation for the 22nd annual Roast Beef Dinner set for today from 4:30-7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church. ENTERTAINMENT Zombies turning out in BemidjiBy Laurie SwensonPioneer Staff Writer AsHalloweenapproaches, so dothe zombies. Last Saturday, zombies filled two blocks of BeltramiAvenue Northwest forthe filming of a scenefrom the movie “Lazarus.” This Saturday, they’ll be onstage at the ChiefTheater for a trilogy ofplays in an eveningbilled as “Three Zombies and a Demon.”Why zombies? Roy C. Booth, whowrote two of the zombieplays and co-wrote theother, said part of it isthat zombies are simple.“It’s the ultimatesimplified monster,”Booth said. “It’s a flesh-eating corpse that risesup and runs after you.He has no electronics,he has no other means,other than just ‘Braaaaaains’ or whatever.” The presentation atthe Chief Theatre, billedas “Three Zombies anda Movie,” will include Photo courtesy of Lara Gerhardson More than 300 people made up as zombies filled two blocks of Beltrami Avenue last Saturday during the shooting of a scene for the film “Lazarus.” The zombies are moving past the Chief Theatre, which will feature three zombie plays and a short film this Saturday. BEMIDJI CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE FORUMBar closing time change unlikely ELECTIONS Sheriff candidates raise $5,000 Zombies: See Page 7 City Council: See Page 11 BREC: See Page 12 Campaigns: See Page 12
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 33  Local Breaking News Coverage Weeklies up to 1,500–15 entries First Place: Tyler Tribute, Robert Wolfington, Michele Rowell, Chuck Hunt & Sandy Hansen Weathering the storm Hands down, an award-winning issue by this group of folks. Well- written, well-photographed and well-put-together paper. While the amount of copy wasn’t that much, the photos spoke in its place. It gave area residents the total picture of what had occurred and where. The web updates were well done, also. Great job by all involved. Second Place: Republican-Leader, Preston, Lisa Brainard, David Phillips & Melissa Vander Plas Crowd catches glimpse of president as he passes through Preston Most political stories are blah from the get-go: handshaking, flag waving, kissing of babies. But this one was so different in the way it was handled by this paper. The map was a well-designed element to this package and puts it all in context for the reader. The stories weren’t overly politicized but covered what the paper’s readers needed to know. If the first place winner had not been in the mix, this would have been my choice for that spot. Very well done. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–22 entries First Place: ECM Post Review, North Branch, Jon Tatting Tuesday morning was a blast, storm takes down trees, power lines Within 24 hours the Post Review published engaging coverage of a storm that ripped through the area. Jon Tatting didn’t rely on officials to cover the event, but reported residents accounts, answering the question, why should I care. Nicely done. Second Place: Jackson County Pilot, Ryan Brinks Super saturated: First estimate is $250K in flood damage Staff of the Jackson County Pilot prove that online coverage can combine effectively to keep residents informed. The online element made it easy to follow a developing story, which was followed up with thorough print coverage. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  Former NB grad gives presentation SEE PAGE 7 z vitamin d Cool Beanz reopens with some fun SEE PAGE 6 136th Year No. 32 Serving North Branch, Harris, Stacy, Rush City, Almelund and surrounding areas $1.00 WEdNESdAY, AuGuSt 3, 2011 the Post Reviewthe Post Review East Central Minnesota z comedy in nb News and general information (651) 674-7025 • Fax (651) 674-7026 • e-mail: [email protected] • Subscribe or place your classified ads online: www.ecmpostreview.com www.ecmpostreview.com Opinions ........pages 4-5Business ............. page 6Community ........ page 7 Youth ................. page 8Police report ...... page 9Religion ........... page 11 Sports ........pages 12-13Classifieds ........ page 20 Food & Fun ..... page 21 Calendar .......... page 21 tO SuBSCRIBE CALL 651-674-7025 Q R A p p R eq ui re d Scan Me! Smartphone Friendly Tracked 2D barcode providesa link directly to our website. In The News This Week Have fun at Stacy Daze this weekend The day starts with a pancake breakfast in the park, 8 a.m. Soft-ball tournaments run all day at Doyle Fields. A parade starts at noon, free rootbeer floats in the park. There’s games, food and fun, a petting zoo, pony rides, firefight-er’s waterball fight and fireworks at 10 p.m. Live band in the park Satur-day 8 p.m. - midnight.See the “Transformer” truck in the parade! Get yer tractor ready! Annual Threshing Show Tractor Caravan is this Sunday, Aug. 6. See page 21 for details of the Caravan and the Threshing Show coming up Aug. 12-14 School board election Three positions will be open this year on the Rush City School Board. Filing for can-didates runs Aug. 90 - Aug. 23 at the school district office in the high school. Seats open cur-rently belong to Stefanie Folkema, Brenda Nessel and Scott Tryon. Braham Pie Day is this Friday, Aug. 5 It’s about all things pie, including the eating of said with ice cream in Freedom Park, down-town Braham. Runs all day. Schedule on page 21 Tuesday morning was a blast, storm takes down trees, power lines More photos on back By Jon tatting In a fierce encore from Monday’s weather, a thun-derstorm accompanied by lightning, rain and high winds tore through the North Branch area leaving much damage to property Tuesday morning, Aug. 2. By MaryHelen SwansonMore people have joined the vote yes levy commit-tee for the North Branch schools. Last Thursday there were over three dozen people in the NB school board meet-ing room showing support for this year’s operating levy. Trent Jensen, a resident of the NB community since 1986, has offered to chair the overall committee.It is time now for people to step forward and sign up for subcommittees. The areas that residents - parents, educators, commu-nity members, business peo-ple - can help with include advertising, get out the vote, events and fundraising.Said one supporter as she signed up, “The state’s not doing it so we have to do it ourself.” She was speak-ing of providing funding to make education equitable for North Branch students as well as all the others in the state. It is well-known by now that 90 percent of school districts in Minnesota have an excess levy in place, many are going to the polls this year for renewal and others, like NB, to get one passed for the first time.NB has not been suc-cessful in past years in get-ting a levy passed, not even when the economy has been booming and there was strong growth in the area.But this year the school board has conducted a survey that showed some positives in the community, new school board members have joined the team who formerly have opposed the levy and have changed their minds and there appears to be a stronger group of people in support of a levy willing to work hard to get it passed. The levy question has been simplified and will be only one question on the ballot and the duration of the levy will be only three years. The impact on an aver-age home in the NB school district is expected to be about $10 per month. (The average home is figured at $166,000 in value). The district is facing a $2.5 million deficit as it goes into the 2012-13 school year, passage of this fall’s levy referendum would gar-ner about $1 million to off-set that deficit. The district is anticipat-ing deficit situations for sev-eral years, until growth and population returns to the community and the state comes up with more equi-table funding for Minnesota schools. By Jon tatting Wayne Buisman wears his T-shirt that reads, “If you’re not Dutch, you’re not much” with pride, and that certainly was the case last month when he helped honor a Minnesota Twins great and his heritage.Buisman, from Har-ris, stood side by side with now Hall of Fame pitcher Bert Blyleven during a cer-emony for the retirement of his jersey #28 before a sell out crowd July 16 at Target Field in Minneapolis.The Netherlands born pitcher, who originally went by Rick Aalbert, is the first Dutchman to be selected into the Hall of Fame. In fact, only 24 Dutchmen have played major league baseball, Buisman ex-plained. An officer of the Nether-lands Association of Amer-ica in Minnesota (NAAM), Buisman went to great lengths to help recognize Blyleven. In April of this year, he traveled to the pitcher’s home town of Zeist to personally request a letter of appreciation from the burgermeister (mayor). A 26-year-old St. Paul man died Sunday afternoon after he jumped from the cliffs and failed to surface in the St. Croix River, near Rock Island, according to the Chisago County Sher-iff ’s Office. Nicholas Paul Johns, for-merly of Lindstrom, was recovered from the river at approximately 6:25 p.m. and pronounced dead at the scene. The sheriff ’s office re-ceived a 9-1-1 call regard-ing a possible drowning at about 4:09 p.m. The rescue and recovery effort included four local fire departments, the National Parks Service and Minnesota DNR. The Minnesota Regional Medical Examiner’s Office will be determining cause and manner of death, the sheriff ’s office said. “Nick lived his life to the fullest from the time he was a child, but he left us too soon. He will forever be loved and missed,” accord-ing to his obituary. A funeral service is sched-uled for 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 4 at Maranatha As-sembly of God in Forest Lake. Visitation is 9 a.m. until the time of service. Ar-rangements are being han-dled by Mattson Funeral Home & Cremation Service, Forest Lake. Man, 26, dies after cliff jump into St. Croix River Honoring Bert Blyleven, a proud Dutchman Blyleven Continued on page 2 Photos courtesy of Minnesota Twins/Wayne Kryduba Supporters begin campaign to get NB school levy passed NB levy committee Continued on page 2 Top, straight line winds ripped through the north end of this building, occupied by Desiree’s Dance Studio and Swede-O, Inc., in the North Branch industrial park. Bottom left, these kids check out what’s left of an uprooted tree in the back of a yard on Main Street. Bottom right, this tree could not withstand the strong winds and appears wrapped around a home on Maple Street. Storm damageContinued on page 22 By Robert Wol�ingt on [email protected] .comTYLER — The storm only lasted for a few minutes, but the scars it left behind will be seen for years.The National Weather Service con�irmed a low grade tornado along with straight line winds of at least 80 miles an hour ripped through Tyler at 4 p.m. on Fri-day, July 1.Lisa Schmit from the National Weather Service was in Tyler Saturday, July 2 to evaluate the damage to determine what kind of a storm hit Tyler.A tornado was also con�irmed in the Ruthton area, causing sig-ni�icant tree loss and damage to a number of homes and busi-nesses throughout the commu-nity.Lake Benton and Verdi Town-ship were also hit by the storm, causing damage throughout both communities.Shortly after the storm began, power was lost throughout Ty-ler.By the time the storm passed, large trees throughout Tyler were down or severely damaged. A number of buildings were de-stroyed including a few homes, a number of garages and other buildings. Power was restored in parts of Tyler Sunday afternoon and was expected to be available to all customers by 2 p.m. Monday afternoon, city of�icials said.Of�icials said while power would be available to residents, if the line coming into the home was damaged, power could re-main out for some customers.Earlier in the day Saturday, Tyler Mayor Kurt Thomsen de-clared a state of emergency.Lincoln County Emergency Manager Jeanna Sommers said Tuesday the Lincoln County Board of Commissioners de-clared a state of emergency in the county and the situation is overwhelming the resources of both the cities and the county.Before the state of federal gov-ernment can declare an emer-gency, both the city and county would need to make their own declarations.Thomsen said Monday morn-ing that cleanup work has been going strong throughout town.“Things have been going good,” said Thomsen. “We have had a lot of help cleaning up.”Thomsen said crews from all over the region came to Tyler over the weekend to help in the cleanup process.“We have had help from all over, various communities have sent help and various counties have also sent help,” said Thom-sen.Thomsen said he wanted to reassure everyone in Tyler that the town will be cleaned up but encouraged everyone to take their time and to be safe.“We’ll get it cleaned up, it will take some time but we’ll get it all cleaned up,” said Thomsen. “Everybody slow down, no one has been hurt and I would like July 6, 2011 • Vol. 40 No. 6 USPS 963-720 • Ty ler, Minnesota 561 78TRIBUTET Y L E R The storm didn’t stop her wedding page 2 $100 Tyler Tribute • 124 North Tyler Street , PO Box Q, Tyler, M N 56178 • Phone an d fax 507-247-5502 www.tylertribute. com • E-mail us: tr ibute@tylertribute .com • editor: rwol �ington@frontiern et.net The City of Tyler will not be collecting construction ma-terials and isn’t planning on providing a drop off site city of�icials said Monday. Resi-dents are encouraged to con-tact their insurance adjuster and �ind proper ways to dis-pose of the materials. Most insurance companies will pay for debris. Thursday, July 7Hi 80° — Low 65°Storms possible Friday, July 8Hi 82° — Low 70°Sunny Saturday, July 9Hi 81° — Low 71°Storms possible Sunday, July 10Hi 82° — Low 66°Storms possible Tornado also touches down in Ruthton area Index Weekend Weather Looking ahead Inside stories City of Tyler will not be collecting construction materials Ruthton residents spent the weekend cleaning up de-bris from the same storm that touched down in Tyler. Like Tyler, Ruthton was stuck by straight line winds and a low grade tornado, the National Weather Service said. See more Ruthton photos on page 11. Local Page 2 Opinion Page 4 Faith Page 7 Ruthton Page 10 Classifieds Page 14 For more events in the Tyler area see the calendar on page 3. Tyler City Adminis trator Dan Tolsma announces he is leaving The RTR School Board will hold a special meeting on Wednesday, July 6 at 8 p.m. at RTR Elementary School in Ruthton.The next regular monthly meeting of the RTR School Board will be held on Monday, July 18 at 8 p.m. in the cafete-ria at RTR Middle School in Russell. RTR July Board meetings Vennskap 554 Sons of Nor-way meet for their annual pot-luck picnic on Monday, July 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hendricks Lake Park Picnic Shelter. Anyone interested in Scandi-navian culture is invited to at-tend. For further information call 507-296-4566. Sons of Norway picnic set for July 11 Weathering the st orm Con�irmed tornados and straight line winds of more than 80 miles an hour hit Tyler and Ruthton Friday, July 1, region also hit by strong winds Photo by Robert Wo lfington One of the grain b ins at the elevator near downtown T yler was �lattened duri ng the storm that caused severe dam age to buildings and trees throughout town. Photo by Robert Wo lfington Shortly after the st orm hit Tyler, frien ds, family member s and neighbors ca me out to start the clean up process. A number of homes had trees b locking doors and falling on roofs ca using varying degr ees of damage thro ughout Tyler. Crew s continued to work throughout t he weekend into th e Fourth of July hol iday on Monday. By Robert Wol�ingt on tributeeditor@gmail .comTYLER — Tyler City Adminis-trator Dan Tolsma informed the council last week that he will be leaving the position at the end of July.Tolsma’s announcement came prior to the wind storm that hit Tyler Friday, July 1.Tolsma has taken another city administration position in Spring Park near the Twin Cities metro area.Tolsma said the original plan was to exit the position in Tyler on July 29 and start in Spring Park on Aug. 1. In light of the storm damage, Tolsma said it will be a wait-and-see as to how it will happen.“I am going to have to wait and see from what my original plan was, which was July 29 was my scheduled last day and I would start there Aug. 1,” said Tolsma. “My obvious priority is helping Tyler now and I think they’ll be understanding (in Spring Park) too.”Mayor Kurt Thomsen said Fri- day the council will be discussing how it will �ill the position dur-ing its next city council meeting scheduled for Tuesday, July 5.“(Dan) told us he will help us as much as he can in �inding a replacement and will work with that person up to speed on the (water project),” said Thomsen.Tolsma started with Tyler two years ago and was given a list of projects the council wanted to complete at that time. Dan Tolsma Storm continues on page 2� Tolsma continues on page 5�
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 34 Weeklies 2,501-5,000–34 entries First Place: Pipestone County Star, Debra Fitzgerald, Jennifer Burris, John Draper & Kyle Kuphal Tornado touchdowns confirmed The paper deployed all of its resources to cover this event. Various perspectives and voices culminated in comprehensive coverage of the tornado. Second Place: Park Rapids Enterprise, Sarah Smith Community mourns after tragedy Very well reported with a variety of sources, plus nuts-and-bolts facts. The story was handled with the right tone and sensitivity. Weeklies over 5,000–15 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader, Doug Hanneman, Terry Davis, Jorge Sosa & Kay Johnson Shaken By Layoffs Incredibly thorough work by a real news team covering the absolute devastation of an economic catastrophe for a small community. Every angle covered and well written. A tour de force. Second Place: Forest Lake Times, Cliff Buchan As tornado approaches FL, sirens fail Story captured the urgency of what went wrong, why it matters and what’s being done about it in a gripping matter. All Dailies–55 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune, Jana Hollingsworth Grief takes hold at Deeps The personal story of a family dealing with the worst kind of tragedy is handled well by this reporter who provides a gripping narrative about the incident and the danger of swimming at The Deeps. Sidebar on previous swimming incidents this year rounded out the package well. Second Place: St. Cloud Times, Dave Aeikens Train derails in Paynesville Solidly written with great online components, including video and social media commentary via Twitter and Facebook. Local Breaking News Coverage CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Up-To-The-Minu te Weather At: www.pipestones tar.com/weather Thursday: High 84 • Low 64 Isolated T-Storms Friday: High 82 • Low 70 Partly Cloudy Saturday: High 86 • Low 71 Scattered T-Storms Sunday: High 82 • Lo w 66 Scattered T-Storms Monday: High 80 • L ow 64 Scattered T-Storms Weather A Week Ago... A Year Ago... HIGH LOW HI GH LOW 91 56 80 53 91 55 81 58 91 55 86 64 83 62 87 62 85 62 80 56 USPS 433-940 Thursday, July 7, 2 011 1 32nd Year • No. 27 Post 6 beats Slayton, 17-9 Section B page 2A The circus is here! Don’t miss the one-day event Thursday, July 7 page 4A Schomacher on the shutdown page 4A Imus cowboy A week on the radio personality’s New Mexico ranch .53 .02 .3 .01 By Debra Fitzgeral d The high wind s that caused widesprea d dam- age last Friday, July 1, contained brief t ornado touchdowns in th e Tyler and Ruthton areas. The damage assess- ment results re ported from the National W eather Service for Pipesto ne and Lincoln counties i ndicat- ed the supercell th under- storm that moved across southwestern Min nesota spawned a tornad o that touched down a round 3:50 p.m. just sou thwest of Ruthton and t racked northeast, with th e most significant damage occur- ring on the south side of Ruthton just west o f Hwy. 23. Several garage s were damaged and on e was completely cleared off its foundation. The tornado wa s rated a high-end EF1 w ith esti- mated winds of 1 00-110 mph. The tornad o was approximately one -eighth of a mile wide with a path length of approxi mately four miles. Then at 3:57 p.m. a stronger, EF2 torna do with estimated winds around 115 mph touched down on the southweste rn side of Tyler and tracked north- east across the tow n. In addition to demol- ishing several ou tbuild- ings and storage facili- ties, numerous stru ctures experienced total ro of loss and damage to e xterior siding. At its widest, th e tor- nado was approxi mately one-quarter mile with a path length of ap proxi- mately three miles. Elsewhere, the storm carried straight-lin e winds estimated between 70-80 mph, said Chris Ja nsen, a National Weather Service meteorologist out o f Sioux Falls. The wind spe eds are estimated based upon Tornado touchdow ns confirmed At the Wallace hou sehold in Verdi (ab ove), the winds las t Friday evening fe lled this large cott onwood tree, nam ed “Grandma” by the household due to its age of at le ast 100 years. The widespread dama ge in Pipestone C ounty included cra cked wind turbine s (clockwise from to p right), crushed g rain bins and topp led vehicles, such as this semi south of Ruthton on Hw y. 23 at 211th St. in the area where on e of two tornadoes touched down. Fo r more photos go t o 10A. For even m ore photos, find us on Facebook or g o to www.pipestone star.com. Pipesto ne Publishing/Joh n Draper and Debr a Fitzgerald Fast-moving, July 1 thunderstorm leav es widespread mar k on Pipestone Cou nty, surrounding a reas Storm Continued on page 10A By Debra Fitzgeral d The question is no lon- ger if the state gove rnment will shut down, b ut how long the shutdow n will last. Last Thursday evening, Gov. Mark Dayto n and Republican Leg islative leaders failed to pa tch par- Split Rock closed, o ther local impacts minimal - so farState closed fo r business This sign was po sted late Thursday afternoo n at Split Rock Creek Stat e Park in Ihlen on the eve of the July 1 state government shutdown. Pipestone Publishi ng/Steven Swenson tisan differences o ver the $5 billion budget deficit, and closed the stat e down Friday, July 1. On the eve of th e shut- down, Dayton held a news conference two hou rs prior to the deadline. “I deeply regr et that the last week of intense negotiations betwe en the Republican leg islative leaders and Sen. (T homas) Bakk, Rep. (Paul) Thissen and myself have f ailed to bridge the divide b etween us,” Dayton said. Sen. Majority Leader Amy Koch said in a state- ment issued by he r office Friday that Repu blicans had worked “tirele ssly to meet Gov. Dayton ’s fund- ing requests that i n many cases, we match ed 100 percent of the way. ” Though thousa nds of state employees ha ve been laid off, the shu tdown’s impact has not t ouched local public or ganiza- tions at this stage of the game. Schools wi ll con- tinue to be funde d, col- leges like Minneso ta West remain open and Health and Human S ervices, like Medical Ass istance, Minnesota Care , food stamps, welfare b enefits and child suppo rt pay- ments continue. Construction w ill not cease, as feared, on the improvement to t he City of Pipestone’s was tewater treatment plant and the check should arriv e in the mail around July 20 for the first installment o f local government aid. City Admin istrator Jeff Jones said the y were relieved to learn about both developments . “Those were the two big items we were wa tching,” Jones said last Frid ay. Leading up to th e shut- down, agencies we re peti- tioning Ramsey County District Court to be stamped a “core fu nction” of the state, which would allow operations during the shutdown. The Minnesota Public Facilities Authority r eceived that stamp, which meant reimbursements w ould be State closed Continued on page 3A This map shows th e current Pipeston e County Commiss ioner Districts and popu lations based on th e 2000 census and the 2010 census (2000 number/2010 num ber). At least one of the districts will c hange before the 2012 election. Sou rce: Pipestone County Auditor’s Office By Kyle Kuphal The U.S. Ce nsus Bureau released the data from the 2010 cen- sus in March and now state and local go vern- ments will use tha t data to ensure that cit izens are equally represe nted. They do that by redistricting, or red raw- ing Congressi onal, Legislative and Commissioner Di strict lines, according to pop- ulation changes since the 2000 census. Within Pipes tone County, that redis trict- ing responsibility falls on the county com mis- sioners. Redistricting c ould change the shap e of the county’s five com- missioner districts and thereby which com mis- sioners represent w hich citizens, and it may even cause some com- missioners to run for reelection before their four year term is up if their district’s po pula- tion has changed to a certain degree. With Commissio ners Marge DeRuyter (Di strict 1), Marv Tinklen berg (District 3), and Jerry Remund’s (Distric t 5) terms ending in 2012, and Commissioner s Bill Johnson, (District 4 ) and Harold “Butch” M iller (District 2) pos sibly What it means for voters, county com missionersRedrawing d istrict lines forced to seek ree lection due to population chang- es, the county boar d could potentially look ve ry dif- ferent after the 201 2 elec- tion. According to sta te stat- ute, each commi ssioner district must enco mpass roughly the same n umber of residents. That n umber is found by simply divid- ing the total pop ulation of the county (9,5 96) by five (the number o f com- missioner districts) , which equals 1,919. Each district m ust fall as close as poss ible to within 10 percent, plus or minus, of that n umber, which means each com- missioner district must have between 1,7 28 and 2,112 people. If t he dis- trict population is higher or lower the count y must redraw the distri ct lines to bring the popula tion as close to that range as pos- sible. Right now Dis trict 1 falls below that ran ge with only 1,637 people; District 4, represented by Jo hnson, is above the rang e with 2,171; and Distri ct five, represented by Rem und, is above the range wi th 2,146 people. Joyce Ste inhoff, Pipestone County auditor, said districts four a nd five, which encompass the city of Pipestone, will change minimally to sp lit the city’s population o f 4,317 as equally as possi ble. But they will still hav e higher populations than th e other three districts b ecause state statute r equires commissioner dist ricts to follow city block, city or township lines, an d pro- hibits precincts from being divided. The Pipeston e City Council must a pprove new precinct bound- aries by April 3, 2012 or within 60 days af ter the Legislature approv es leg- islative and congre ssional districts. Joan Sch roeder, city clerk, said she ’ll work closely with Stein hoff to determine precin ct lines to present to the council. Once city precinct s are set, the county has un til May 1, 2012, or 80 days a fter the Redistricting Continued on page 3A Do you have your dre am job? (28%) Yes, I’m one of the fortunate few. (30%) It doesn’t matt er what I do for work - my dreams are elsewhere. (14%) Only if a nightm are is considered a d ream. (14%) No, but I haven ’t given up hope. (15%) A ‘dream job’ i s like ‘unconditional love’ - nonexistent! Visit www.pipestones tar.com to take the la test poll. THIS WEEK’S RESULTS .02 Trace .06 INSIDE OPINION / 9A SPORTS / 10AA & E CALENDAR / 2B A & E CINEMA / 3BFAITH / 4B LIVES REMEMBERED / 5BPUBLIC RECORD / 5B CLASSIFIEDS / 6B CALL US INFO: 320-587-5000 24 PAGES IN 2 SECTIONS VOL. 131 NO. 19 © 2011 HUTCHINSON LEADER WEATHER Mostly sunny 31 20 Today’s high Tonight’s low Thursday, March 10, 2011 More than 12,000 readers today � $1 � hutchinsonleader.com LeaderLeader H U T C H I N S O NH U T C H I N S O N Judged Minnesota’s Best Non-Daily by the Minnesota Newspaper Association SPRING FORWARD Remember to turn your clocksforward one hour before youretire Saturday night. Shaken by layoffs DEMOCRACY, MINNESOTA STYLE A Norwegian exchange student learnsby serving as a legislative page News / 3A 3,756 3,850 5,458 5,433 4,689 4,591 200 3 Source: Hutchinson Technology Hutchinson Technologyyear-end employment 200 4 200 5 200 6 200 7 200 8 526 538 719 805 865 790 200 3* * Fiscal year Source: Hutchinson Technology Suspension assembliesshipped (in millions) 200 4* 200 5* 200 6* 200 7* 200 8* Work force numbers spiral downwardHutchinson Technology’s work force numbers have swung dra-matically during the past 14 years. In 1997, the company boastedmore than 8,700 employees. By the end of 2002, that numberhad dropped to 3,400. But the number rebounded during the mid-2000s when hiringwas strong, even though newer, more efficient manufacturingprocesses required fewer people to make more suspensionassemblies. By the end of 2005, the number of employees grewto more than 5,450. Last month, the number stood at 2,275 inthe U.S., 350 in Thailand plus additional international employees.By the end of January, the number of domestic employees isexpected to number between 1,375 and 1,575. 553 512 200 9* 2010 * 2,448 2,546 200 9 2010 More than 600 jobs are targeted for elimination in Hutchinson By DOUG HANNEMANEditor Hutchinson Technology Inc. saidTuesday it is moving production outof town. The restructuring will costapproximately 600 manufacturingjobs in Hutchinson as well as supportpositions. Companywide, the reduction willresult in the loss of 700 to 900 jobs.The manufacturer of suspensionassemblies, which during the 1990semployed more than 4,000 people inHutchinson, said it will consolidateits Hutchinson components opera-tions into its operations in Eau Claire,Wis. within 12 months. By the timethe restructuring is complete, thecompany could have 500 or feweremployees remaining in Hutchinson."This is a very difficult decision foreveryone and the decision to consol-idate was not an easy one to make,"said Connie Pautz, the company'scommunications director.Pautz said many of the employeeswho will lose their jobs have beenwith the company a long time and"are not just our colleagues, but alsogood friends." Pautz said she has been in contactwith the Rapid Response Team from Cuts aim to position HTIas lowest-cost producer Residents react with anger, fear and hope By TERRY DAVIS, JORGE SOSA,KAY JOHNSON AND DOUG HANNEMANOf the Leader News that 600 or more people willlose their jobs at Hutchinson Technol-ogy’s local manufacturing plant sur-prised some residents, saddenedmany and enraged others.Justin Barrack, a Hutchinson nativewho works as a food sales representa-tive, said Tuesday’s announcementthat the company will discontinuemanufacturing here is not only devas-tating to the families who are losingtheir jobs, but to the community as awhole. “The economic impact of this deci-sion will be felt by the retail, hospitali-ty and service industries as well as thecity’s tax base and budget,” Barracksaid. “Given the rising costs of food,gas, and the overall cost of living, itcould be an interesting 12 months forthe city of Hutchinson.” City Council Member Chad Czmowski knows well how the loss ofjobs and its potential to force peopleto leave the city can hurt small busi-nesses. He is a owner of OutdoorMotion, a bicycle shop on Main Street.Tuesday’s announcement weighedheavy on him. He sounded frustrated,but resigned to the bad news. “It is just another in a long line oflayoffs at HTI and the city has grownused to it,” Czmowski said. “We’ll justcontinue on.” He pointed to the potential impacton the area’s already high unemploy- STAFF PHOTOS BY KAY JOHNSON AND DOUG HANNEMAN AMONG THOSE COMMENTING about Tuesday’s announcement of layoffs at Hutchinson Technology were, clockwise from upper left, Angela Kahl, Chad Czmowski, Jodie Nassirzadeh and Justin Barrack. By DOUG HANNEMANEditor Hutchinson Technology’s consol-idation and restructuring plan isdriven by economics. It is intended to help the compa-ny achieve its goal of being the low-est cost manufacturer of suspensionassemblies — an objective it hasemphasized during its two mostrecent earnings reports to invest-ment analysts. Its restructuring comes at a timewhen the company’s market sharefor suspension assemblies hasplummeted to about 20 percent,compared to more than 55 percent afew years ago. Actions that will be taken duringthe next 12 months are expected tolower the company’s costs by $45million to $60 million on an annual-ized basis. The decision to consolidate man-ufacturing in Eau Claire was madebecause the plant there is betterequipped and has the capacity forthe production of TSA+, the compa-ny’s newest line of suspensionassemblies. TSA+ assemblies aredesigned to meet manufacturer’sdemands for miniaturization. Eau Claire’s TSA+ manufacturingprocess is more automated than theprocess used to make older suspen-sion assemblies. It also requiresfewer employees. TSA+ assemblies accounted forabout 45 percent of the company'sfiscal 2011 first quarter shipments.They are expected to account formore than half of the company’s fis-cal 2011 second quarter shipmentsand two-thirds of its shipments byyear end. Company President and CEOWayne Fortun said a combination offactors — including improvementsin TSA+ yield and output and being Hutchinson Technology at the markets Symbol: HTCH on the NasdaqMonday’s close: $3.10 Wednesday’s close: $2.60Change: 19-percent decrease in two days On the Web: www.marketwatch. com/quotes/htch Hutchinson Technology moving production out of town THREE PAGES OF COVERAGE INSIDE / 6A-8A � How the layoffs might impact local businesses, city services, the local real estate market and schools � Social service agencies and job specialists are preparing to help laid-off workers See REACTION Page 6A See ECONOMICS Page 6A See LAYOFFS Page 6A DuluthNewsTribuneDuluthNewsTribune duluthnewstribune.co m More than 90,000 readers e veryweekday 75¢ Thursday, August 4, 2 011 See us at the Tw o Harbors Kaya k Festival ww w.theskihut.com See us at the Tw o Harbors Kaya k Festival ww w .theskihut.com KAYAKFESTIVAL2011 AUGUST 6&7 R00113 57 52 -0 80 4 100’s of Kayaks to Try & Buy! Index Tomorrow: Chance of thunderstorms High: 82 Low: 60 Classifieds . . . . .D Comics . . . . . .C6 Games . . . . . . .C5 Lotteries . . . . .A2 Obituaries . . . .B4 Opinion . . . . . .A4 Sports . . . . .B5-6 TV listings . . . .D6 Wave . . . . . . . . .C Weather Today: Cloudy and humid High: 83 Low: 61 Niki Lindgren (from lef t), Lindsey Bender, Cai tlin Reno, Emily Reno a nd Keeley Ogston reac t to the drowning of th eir friend Jefferson Bo wen as they look out over the Leste r River in Lester Park o n Wednesday morning . Photos by Bob King / rk ing@duluthnews.com A CASE OF THE WILLIES As Willie Nelson’s Dulu th show approaches, a lo ok back at his controvers ial 1983 appearance Page C4 Woman claims famed hijacker is her uncle Associated Press OKLAHOMACITY —When an FBI agent pleaded s everal years ago for help finding notorious sky- jacker D.B. Cooper, he wondered, off-handedly, if som eone’s “odd uncle” might be the ir guy. Marla Cooper believ es that her late uncle Lynn Doy le Cooper was themanwho hijack ed a plane in 1971 and parachuted away with $200,000 ransom int o a rainy night over the Pacific Nor thwest. The FBI has for yea rs tried to find out if D.B. Coop er survived the jump, chasingm ore than 1,000 leads as themanwh o pulled off the nation’s only unsolv ed hijacking became part of Ame rican folklore. The agency said it i s following up on a “credible” n ew lead in the Cooper case. FBI ag ent Fred Gutt This artist’s sketch pro vided by the FBI shows the skyjack er known as “D.B. Cooper," made f rom the recol- lections of passengers and crew of a jet he hijacked betwee n Portland and Seattle on Nov. 24, 197 1. Associated Press See Cooper, Page A5 Terminal may miss scheduled opening PETER PASSI ppassi@duluthnew s.com With Congress now on summer recess and the statu s of the Federal Aviation Administr ation still in limbo, the prospects are dimming for a new airport te rminal opening on time in Duluth n ext year. “All the FAA fundin g is interre- lated, and this disru pts our whole schedule,” said Bria n Ryks, execu- tive director of Dulu th Interna- tional Airport. “We ’re already well behind our preferre d schedule.” Congress let the FA A’s authori- zation lapse at midn ight July 22, placing nearly 4,000 employees on furlough and haltin g construction at airports across th e nation as the flow of federal gran t money slowed to a trickle. Ryks said the airpo rt has con- tinued to receive re imbursements for work already in progress at the terminal, but additi onal portions 61 LESTER PARK Glenwood St. Sup erio r St . Le st er Ri ve r R d. Sk yli ne Pk w y. O ccidental Blvd. Lester River Amity Creek The deeps NEWS TRIBUNE GRAPHIC S Lake Superior Grief takes hold at Deeps JANA HOLLINGSWOR TH jhollingsworth@dulu thnews.com Jeff Bowen and his son, Jefferson, spent cou ntless summer days in Les ter Park and its rivers— eve n pulling out a manwho was injured after jumping in the Lester River last summer. The senior Bowen i s an experienced diver w ho has spent time teaching his 13- year-old son how to swim and properly jump into safe swimming areas. B ut not the Amity Creek Deeps . That is a place Bowen has in structed his son to refrain fr om jump- ing and swimming, even Tuesday when the l ast thing he asked his son wa s for a promise not to go th ere, espe- cially after the heav y rain. “He’s a 13-year-old b oy,” Bowen said. “They were being boys.” Jefferson was still m issing as of Wednesday ev ening after entering from a low area into the roiling waters of Amity Creek in th e section known as “the Deep s.” He was reportedly take n by the current in the rain- swollen stream. Rescue workers we re using a remotely op erated underwater vehicle with a cameraWednesday in their search. The search, which in- cluded sweeps of th e banks with dogs, was conc entrated mainly in the Deeps area, where authorities b elieve Jef- fersonmay have be en caught in an eddy that pull ed him under. Family and f riends BOWEN: 13-year- old’s body still missing near the Deeps, a dangerous swimming and diving area of Amity Creek Asthe searchcontinu ed for the 13-year-old whowaspulledunder water inAmityCreek, thosegatheredat the sitemourned theboy theyknewasanavid s wimmerandsports fa n See Boy, Page A3 Marcia Vecker, who as sisted the search and rescue crews on Amity Creek on Wednesday, works wit h police dog Alon, look ing for signs of Bowen along the creek’s edge. Heat brings people closer to danger’s edge JANA HOLLINGSWOR TH jhollingsworth@dulu thnews.com Six people have dro wned and several others n early drowned in a period of 25 days in the North land this summer. Throughout the sta te, 27 people have drow ned this year in non-boating acci- dents through July 31, with 18 of those drownin gs in July alone. Officials point to th e heat and humidity as am ajor cause, because it br ings more inexperienced swim- mers to bodies of wa ter. “It is unusual to hav e that many (drownin gs) in onemonth,” said Ti m Smal- ley, boat and water safety specialist for theMi nnesota Department of Natu ral Re- sources. “People wh o don’t go swimmingmuch were heading to Lake Sup erior (for example) … or g etting in trouble for various reasons.” Ely resident Charle s Skillings drowned J uly 9 after falling out of h is canoe on Grass Lake. Duluth resident Mo nty Lyons died July 11 a fter swimming off Wisco nsin Point. Roberta Kunkel, try ing to rescue her son, Noa h, and his friend, almost d rowned July 20 after a rip cu rrent carried her out from Park Point. Duluth 6-year-oldW yatt Hanna drowned in a Cloquet pool July 21. See Danger, Page A3 See Terminal, Page A5
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 35  Weeklies up to 2,500–13 entries First Place: Blaine-Spring Lake Park Life, Sue Austreng, Elyse Kaner & Jason Olson Bullying impacts all The series was comprehensive, not because of the volume, but because of the voices in the story - from school leaders, to classroom leaders, to students. Presentation on the page was a plus in delivering the story. Second Place: Ely Timberjay, Marshall Helmberger Documents: JCI numbers don’t add up Having access to documents and following through to get them is the key to investigative journalism. Nice work. Weeklies over 2,500–18 entries First Place: Red Wing Republican Eagle, Mike Longaecker Wrongfully accused Well-presented look at the drama and trauma for a one-time school teacher falsely accused of a crime, an event that turned his life upside down. It’s a nightmare scenario well documented and presented here with a look at how it happened, what can be done to avoid it and how the teacher is rebuilding his life. Second Place: Northfield News, David Henke Cracking under pressure Outstanding report with accompanying map and and other enlightening info graphics. Readers get a clear picture of the serious problem with poor roads in the community and the budget shortfall that may keep them that way. Well written and researched. www.abcnewspapers.com 763-421-4444 Friday, Oct. 29, 2010 Page 11A Right: End the Hate an-ti-bully event organiz-ers pose Oct. 20 inside the Riverdale Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar. As guests entered the restaurant they were given an opportu-nity to buy an “End the Hate” T-shirt, demon-strating their desire to put an end to bullying, particularly anti-gay bullying. Pictured here are (left-right) Tammy Aaberg, Jolie Bialke, Jason Kesler (super-visor of Boston’s at Riverdale) and Kristin Maas. Photos by Sue Austreng by Sue Austreng Staff writer Tears welling up in her clear blue eyes, Tammy Aaberg spoke of how “ev-eryone came to (her son Justin) and told him how they were being bullied. He listened and he would make them feel better.” What she didn’t learn until after he took his own life this past July was that Justin was also the victim of vicious bullying. “I was aware of one in-cident, but I had no idea how horrible it was,” Tam-my said. “I want Justin’s legacy to be that he’s the last gay child to take his life be-cause of bullying. To en-sure that what happened to my son doesn’t happen to other students... that’s why I’m here.” Justin, an Anoka High School student who came out to his mother as be-ing gay when he was just 13 years old, was the vic-tim of anti-gay bullying, Tammy said. After his death, Justin’s friends told his mother he’d been a frequent tar-get of bullies mocking his sexual orientation. “He kept that all in, though. He was always there to help his friends, make them feel better, but he never said anything to me about being bullied,” Tammy said. And now she’s out to stop bullying. She’s gone before the Anoka-Henne-pin School Board, asking it to make a change to the school district’s sexual ori-entation neutrality policy. She’s rallied support and spoken to gay students and their families. She’s established a foundation in Justin’s memory. And on Oct. 20, the day of a nationwide movement called Day of Remem-brance, Tammy stopped by Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar in Riverdale, where an End the Hate event was staged. End the Hate organiz-ers sold purple T-shirts and did what they could to get the anti-bullying mes-sage out to all who would listen. “We’re doing this to make a show against bully-ing. To show that we’re not going to tolerate this any more,” said Jolie Bialke, one of the event organiz-ers. “We’re doing this to end the hate, turn the hate into something positive.” Daisy Johnson, who stopped by Boston’s with her husband and little girl, said, “It’s important to have an environment where everybody can feel safe. (We’re) all about pub-lic safety and we should provide that for everyone.” Justin Anderson, a graduate of Blaine High School who said he also endured anti-gay bullying while in high school, came to the End the Hate event at Boston’s “to help end the hate.” “I’m hoping it makes more people motivated to do something,” he said. A portion of the pro- ceeds from the End the Hate event at Boston’s in Riverdale goes to the Jus-tin Aaberg memorial fund, RIP Justin Norman Aa-berg Foundation at TCF Bank. Another portion goes to the Trevor Project, “the leading national organiza-tion focused on crisis and suicide prevention efforts among lesbian, gay, bisex-ual, transgender and ques-tioning (LGBTQ) youth,” as described on its website (www.thetrevorproject.org). Sue Austreng is at sue.austreng@ecm-inc.com Anti-bully websites, resources, helplines Stop Bullying Now! offers tips from the U.S. Depart-ment of Health and Human Services on how to identify and prevent bullying; www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov. Stop Bullying: Speak Upoffers online resources for parents and kids; www.stop-bullyingspeakup.com. The Anti-Defamation League offers tips for par-ents and resources for teach-ers; www.adl.org/combatbul-lying. WiredSafety provides tips for teens on how to safely navigate the Internet and for parents to keep track of their child’s web-based activities; www.wiredsafety.org. Pacer’s National Center for Bullying Prevention is a child-advocacy group focus-ing on children with disabili-ties and offers anti-bullying materials; www.pacer.org/bullying; KidsAgainstBully-ing.org. GLSEN, the Gay Les-bian Straight Education Network, offers support for schools to implement anti-bullying programs; www.glsen.org/bullying. To learn more about sui-cide prevention – including warning signs of suicide and depression – visit www.save.org or www.take5tosavelives.org or call 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433). Bullying by the numbers National statistics on bullying include: • One out of four kids are bullied. • One out of fi ve kids admits to being a bully.• Eight percent of stu-dents miss one day of class per month for fear of bullies. • More youth vio-lence occurs on school grounds as opposed to on the way to school.• Every seven minutes a child is bullied. • With bullying, adult intervention ranks at 4 percent; peer interven-tion at 11 percent; and no intervention at 85 percent. • 43 percent of students fear harassment in the bathroom at school.• Approximately 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month. • Name-calling, rumors and threatening to harm someone are the top forms of bullying. • 79 percent of bullying happens in the schools.• 99 percent of bullying happens in the school building or outside on school grounds. (Source: http://stopbul-lyingnow.hrsa.gov) by Sue Austreng Staff writer Lately, bullying and its tragic consequences have been all over the news. It seems every time you turn on television news, open a magazine or read a newspaper there’s another report. Truth is, bullies have been around forever – why, even back in Bible times, Joseph’s brothers ripped off his clothes, threw him into the pit and then sold him into slavery. But, tragically, it seems children’s response to bul-lying has taken a fatal turn. During the past year, seven current or former Anoka-Hennepin students have taken their own lives after facing bullying and harassment. Those suicides were the bullied students’ desperate attempt to escape the pain of being bullied. What is bullying? Who are its victims? Why is it so prevalent? What are the signs your child might be being bullied? What are the signs your child might be a bully? How can we make it stop? And what can be done to help these chil-dren? All these questions and more will be explored in the coming weeks with ABC Newspapers’ bullying series, appearing on these pages over the next three months. The series, which will appear on alternating weeks, will include histori-cal reports of bullying in and around the schools in the Anoka-Hennepin, St. Francis and Spring Lake Park districts. It will examine what makes for a successful anti-bullying campaign in the schools. We’ll look at how schools are raising aware-ness of bullying and in-creasing vigilance against attacks. And we’ll profi le a for-mer bully and a recovered victim of bullying. Sue Austreng is at sue.austreng@ecm-inc.com By SUE AUSTRENG Staff Writer By SUE AUSTRENG Staff Writer Anti-bullyEVENT Left: Terra Aaberg shows her aunt, Tammy Aaberg, the custom lettering she had put on her “End the Hate” T-shirt. Terra’s cousin (Tam-my’s son) Justin Aa-berg committed sui-cide in July. Tammy believes that “anti-gay bullying had a hand in Justin’s sui-cide,” she said. Left: Visitors to the Riverdale Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar Oct. 20 were greeted with purple balloons and given an opportunity to purchase a purple “End the Hate” T-shirt during the six-hour anti-bullying event staged there. Proceeds from the event were given to the Trevor Project and to the RIP Jus-tin Norman Aaberg Foundation at TCF Bank fund. A lot of people have a good idea of what bullying is because they see it every day. According to Webster’s Dictionary, a bully is “a blustering, quarrelsome, overbearing person who habitually badgers and intimi-dates smaller or weaker people.” Bullying can include: • Punching, shoving, and other physical acts • Spreading rumors• Excluding others from a “group”• Teasing in any form• Getting people to “gang up” on others Bullying also can happen online or electron-ically. Cyberbullying is when a bully uses the internet, mobile phones or other technology to reach out. This can include: • Sending text, email, or instant messages• Posting pictures or messages about oth-ers in blogs or on websites• Using someone else’s user name to spread rumors or lies about someone(Source: www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov/kids) At ABC Newspapers we’re always looking for input from our readers regarding story ideas, sources, background informtaion and opinion. We want to hear from you, our read-ers in the community. Contact us by phone (763-421-4444), email (peter.bodley@ecm-inc.com), visit our website at abcnewspa-pers.com or send us a message through our fan page on Facebook or Twitter account (@abcnewspapers). bul•ly (bool’e) n., pl. -lies, v., -lied, -lying, adj., interj. Investigative Reporting CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  By Jon Swedien jswedien@republic an-eagle.com HAGER CITY — Tina Hinrichs was pre paring her youngest dau ghter, Hanna, for schoo l Mon- day morning wh en she heard a terrible ruckus coming from the train tracks a few hu ndred yards from her hom e. “I felt this big ru mble and our power wen t out,” Hinrichs said M onday afternoon. “You knew right away som ething was going on.” A freight train ha uling consumer product s from Chicago to S eattle derailed at 7:18 a.m . as it traveled through Hager City. Nine cars, c onsist- ing of 31 platform s and carrying 62 con tainer loads were knocke d over near the Nestle Purina factory and s everal homes. There were no inju ries. The factory sus tained damage to its south wall. Pierce County Sh eriff Nancy Hove, whose deputies along wit h other authorities arrived on the scene shortly aft er the derailment, said it is for- tunate more har m was not done. “Pure luck.” Hove said, adding, “It’s a mir acle no one got hurt.” Burlington Nort hern Santa Fe is invest igating the cause of the derail- ment, com pany Wednesday Turn to page 14A R E D W I N G R E P U B L I C A N GEAGLE R E D W I N G , M I N N E S O T A www.republican-ea gle.com September 15, 201 0 • 1 Dollar $1.99 lb. lb. This week’s specials g ood Wed., Sept. 15 t h ru Mon., Sept. 20 Koplin’s Village MarketKoplin’s Village Market 5th & Bush St., Red W ing, M N 651-388-470 1 5th & Bush St., Red W ing, M N 651-388-470 1 Local Nesbitts Fresh ApplesTAKE YOURTAKE YOURTAKE YOUR PICKPICKPICKand Saveand Sa ve Family Pack A ssorted Pork Chops $1.69 Heartland Farms All Natural U.S. Choice New York Strip $7 . 49 lb. lb.99 ¢ Stuffed Pork Chops or Beef Birds Mississippi National City takes steps tow ard selling course / 2A An American journey be gins Justin Staker starts a 1,500 mile padd le to the Gulf of Me xico / 1B By Mike Longaeck er mikel@republican-e agle.com There was absolu tely nothing remarka ble to Joe Halvorson ab out his drive home from work April 22, 2008. He left Zumbr ota- Mazeppa High School just after 3:30 p. m. and drove down Highw ay 52 to his Rochester ho me. “I didn’t think any thing peculiar happene d that day,” he later recal led. But something pec uliar did happen. Unbe- knownst to Halvo rson, a man pulled up alo ngside a moving busload of Can- non Falls High School girls that afterno on and exposed himself on High- way 52. Halvorson would not become aware of th e inci- dent until nearly a month later — after rece iving a cryptic letter fro m the Minnesota State Patrol requesting him to call a trooper about his activi- ties from that Apri l day. Halvorson didn’t real- ize it at the time, but the letter represent ed the beginning of his d escent into the wormho le. He would later be ch arged with indecent exp osure, allegations that drew wide media attenti on and instantly stigmatiz ed him as a teacher. He would eventual ly be cleared of the cha rges by First District Court Judge Kevin Mar k, who determined “it would have been fac tually impossible for the defen- dant to have com mitted the offense.” But that conclu sion was not reached until more than a year — and thousands of dol lars in attorney’s fees — la ter. For most people , the case represents a night- mare scenario: being wrongly accused o f a dis- turbing crime. Ha lvorson lived the nightma re, but said the stigma behind the allegations con tinues to haunt him. “The true impa ct of these false alleg ations can never be deter- mined,” he said a year after being exonera ted. So just how did Ha lvor- son end up in this predicament? A re view of his case file and court transcripts ind icates Halvorson was the victim of misidentificati on, his alibi dismissed by prose- cution. The offense Nobody involved in the case doubts the o ffense the girls on the b us say they witnessed a ctually occurred. According to mul tiple accounts, the bu s left Cannon Falls High School around 3:1 5 p.m. for a softball ga me in Rochester. While t he bus entered a stretch on the highway that d ivides northbound and south- bound traffic with a grove of trees north of Z umbro- ta, the girls witne ssed a man in a car exp ose his genitals. The motorist the n hit the brakes and d ropped back behind th e bus, according to w itness statements. The girls, stunned and sic kened, groaned aloud. On e later said she felt “emot ionally raped.” One witness w ould later testify she got a good look at the s uspect, describing him as a big- ger, bald male in h is 30s. The general desc ription matched Halvo rson’s appearance, thou gh the eyewitnesses’ reco llection of the suspect veh icle did not: The girls re ported seeing a bluish car , while Halvorson’s car was green. Coaches on the bus learned of the in cident moments later an d told the girls to get th e vehi- cle’s license plate n umber if they saw it again . As they entered the Rochester area, th e girls cried out, “Ther e’s the car, there’s the car,” according to a sta tement from the team’s head coach. They jotted down the license plate as it passed the bus. The plate s came back to Halvorson. After returning from the game, coaches alerted the Cannon Falls a thletic director, who a dvised them to report th e inci- dent to police. State trooper Troy Siems investigat ed the case. On May 29, 2 008 — more than a mont h after the offense — he inter- viewed players and coaches. After giving st ate- ments, the two gir ls who witnessed the in cident were issued a pho to line- up. Both indepen dently identified Halvor son as Derailed First in the series Today: The case — or lack thereo f — against Joe Halvorson Saturday: Halvorso n fears his teachin g career is done Sept. 22: Where d id the system go w rong? Witnesses in the April 22, 2008, indecent exposur e case described the offense as occurri ng along Highway 5 2 near Cannon Fal ls in a hilly area w here the highway is div ided by trees. The top photo depicts the approximate loca- tion of the crime, where a man expo sed himself to a b usload of high sch ool girls. But prosecut ion raised the pos sibility in court tha t the offense loca tion may have occurre d near another Hi ghway 52 location divided by trees near Pine Island, depict ed in the bottom p hoto. Sally Shepherd/ R-E graphic Jon Swedien/Repu blican Eagle A train derailed M onday morning in Hager City, seen h ere from Highway 63. No one was in jured in the wreck. The long road to inno cence Today’s obituaries Page 6A Nancy J. Anderson , 61 Dorothy May Chap man, 92 Margaret Gruber, 6 9 Arthur Von Helmst , 98 This week’s online question www.republican-ea gle.com How do you rate fi rst local responders in a cri sis? Wallace Jagusch, 8 6 Julie Kimmes, 49 Stella Parberry Ph illips, 40 Lorraine Schaefer, 94 Turn to TRAIN, page 7A Turn to INNOCENCE, p age 3A
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 36 All Dailies–30 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune, Brandon Stahl & Mark Stodghill The Case of Dr. Konasiewicz Without a doubt, this investigation has likely saved lives. The amount of work that went into this must have been tremendous, as most of us know how hard it is to get folks in the medical community to talk and release information. Great job. Hopefully, this report will follow the doctor to Texas and other states if he moves again. I’d also like to commend Duluth for its other investigative reports. Though they did not win, “Two Stories, One Tuth,” and “Excelsior Energy,” join this report to show a strong dedication at this newspaper to devote resources to what newspapers still do better than anyone else: Watchdog journalism. Second Place: The Free Press, Mankato, Mark Fischenich Delayed, deferred and deadly: The long wait for a four-lane Highway 14 Any time you work on a story involving elected officials and decisions made, you hit roadblocks, talking points and spin. Great job to keep pushing forward with this. I hope the newspaper will continue to do so until that road is complete. Honorable Mention: St. Cloud Times, Kirsti Marohn County workers start to feel pain Database reporting at its finest. Despite the complaints you likely got from folks whose salary was listed, it is great to be able to compare apples to apples and show readers the discrepancies in pay. Investigative Reporting CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 37  Weeklies up to 1,500–17 entries First Place: Ramsey County Review, North St. Paul, Heather Edwards Cinnamon takes the spice out of air freshener; Finally a brides- maid, finally a bride; The wedding, part two I was actually laughing out loud at these light-hearted columns about everyday things like husband who loves certain smells and the trials and tribulations of being a bridesmaid. Second Place: Cass Lake Times, Allan Olson One Long Day; A Fishing Adventure; Yessy, Yessy, Yes!!!! Nice personal columns about not-so-everyday happenings to a family guy. From fishing with the kids to hitting a deer, lots of laughs here. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–25 entries First Place: Jackson County Pilot, Justin R. Lessman Just’n Opinion Good writing and vivid images, especially on columns involving family that also had an extra depth and resonance to them, with a side of humor. Second Place: Pelican Rapids Press, Louis Hoglund From My View Point Interesting topics related to the community, with a special nod to the one on lutefisk. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–31 entries First Place: Mille Lacs Messenger, Isle, Rob Passons Very talented writer who tackles a range of subjects readers relate to, including some touchy and personally revealing topics handled with a mix of humor and care. Entertaining and thoughtful style. I bet readers look forward to this page each week. Beautiful job. Second Place: Northfield News, Shane Kitzman Writer knows where a good story exists, and how to tell it. Shares with readers a range of emotions from the world of sports, the death of a community softball figure to a touching moment of school team sportsmanship, in a style that any reader can enjoy. Columnist CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  “Measles outbreak in Minneapolis” “Measles scare for Minnesota infants” “Autism fears, measles spike among Minn esota Soma- lis” Before I saw these headlines, I hadn’t th ought about measles in years, maybe even decades. Once a common childhood disease, meas les outbreaks were largely something from the past in Minnesota thanks to the measles-mu mps- rubella vaccine. Probably the last time I gave any serio us consideration to measles was when my sons received their MMR shots. And even then , my primary concern was allying their fears pri or to the needle pokes (they were so squirmy it took two nurses and their father to hold them still) and then comforting them when they w him- pered afterwards. The MMR vaccine was so successful at er adicating the epidemics that pediatricians report today’s young parents have never even seen a case of the mea sles and often question the need to vaccinate their childre n. And lingering fears remain that the M MR vaccine might cause autism, even though the Briti sh doctor who claimed there was a link is now completely discredited. Because I have such clear memories of how scary it was when my sister, Crystal, came down with “ red” measles, I didn’t need to be convinced of the necessity of the vaccine for my children. Crystal was getting ready for kindergarten when she became quite ill with the hig hly contagious, sometimes lethal, virus and w as quarantined for a week during a stretch of muggy summer weather. Back then, parents often tried to shelte r their children from life’s troubles, so it w as startling when I overheard Mom and D ad worriedly discussing my bedridden sist er, who was listless and had a high fever a nd severe cough. When you’re 8 years old a nd your parents are that frightened, it makes a n impression. Central air conditioning wasn’t yet comm on in Mid- western homes, and Crystal spent days r ecuperating in our parents’ first-floor bedroom, a special privilege even though it was only marginally cooler tha n the upstairs room she and I shared. Black screens covered the open windows , and neigh- borhood playmates stopped by every day to say hello, all the while maintaining a safe distance fro m the patient. I can still see them on their tiptoes peeri ng through the screens, hoping to glimpse my sister’s odd ly red eyes and blotchy rash. When I was young, we knew “measles” s o well there were common names for two unrelated viruses. There were the “red” or “hard” measles and the “German” measles. When measles all but disappeare d, those names faded from our lexicon. Today the viruses a re now known by their medical designations: rubeola (re d measles) and rubella (German measles). It wasn’t just red measles that were a con cern a half- century ago. When a pregnant woman c aught the Ger- man measles, it could cause significant birt h defects if she passed the virus to her unborn child. That’s exactly what happened to a family at the end of our block. The mother, Norma, contracte d rubella from her preschooler while she was pregnant, a nd her infant, Debbie, was born with mental handicap s and physical deformities. When she was high-school a ge, Debbie had the mental capacity of a 5-year-old and n eeded a bulky back brace to stand upright. This kind of tragedy happens rarely toda y, thanks to the MMR vaccine. But as memories of t he true cost of measles and rubella fade, so does the un derstanding of why the vaccines are necessary. I realize vaccines are only truly effective if we all get them. When some parents choose to op t out, as hap- pened recently in the Somali community i n Minneapolis, because of unfounded fears about an autis m connection, disease outbreaks can occur. In the case of measles, there is no cure or medication that helps ease symptoms, so the kids just have to wait for the virulent virus to run its course. The Centers for Disease Control finds: • one out of 20 children who get rubeola “measles” also get pneumonia. Two or three of every 1, 000 die. • a pregnant woman who contracts rub ella early in the pregnancy has a 1 in 5 chance of having a c hild with birth defects, including mental retardation, d eafness, heart defects and organ damage Although the autism/MMR vaccine con nection has been thoroughly debunked, in 2008 ab out 40 percent of American parents were refusing at least on e form of vac- cine for their youngsters, states Michael W illrich in “Pox, An American History,” his new book on th e introduction of the smallpox vaccine. He contends that right now the vaccine c ontroversy is one of the most important public health cr ises we face in America. Because viruses spread in human popu lations from person to person, he believes in “herd im munity” -- get- ting everyone vaccinated so the viruses simply never get a toehold in a community. The probl em, he says, is that Americans bristle at the idea of being part of a herd. There’s an attraction in this culture to be ing individual and “knowing better” than our neighbors. But if today’s young parents had a listless child with a hacking cough and very high fever, who c ould die just as easily as recover from the measles, and the y were helpless to help her, I have a feeling they would qu ickly set aside their fears and gladly join the herd. Mary Lee Hagert can be reached at mlhage rt@lillienews. com or at 651-748-7820. Review Page 4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 LILLIE SUBURBAN NEWSPAPERS, INC. Publishers of: RAMSEY COUNTY REVIEW Publication No. 454980 Published weekly — Periodicals Postage Paid, St. Paul, Minnesota MAPLEWOOD REVIEW Publication No. 328680 Published weekly — Periodicals Postage Paid, St. Paul, Minnesota www.review-news.com e-mail: review@lillienews.com Main Office at 2515 E. 7th Ave. North St. Paul, Minn., 55109 Office Hours: 9 a.m to 4 p.m. Telephone: (651) 777-8800 —-FAX: (65 1) 777-8288 Want Ads: (651) 748-7888 — Circulation : (651) 777-8800 Jeffery R. Enright and Ted H. Lillie, Publi shers T.R. Lillie, founder, Lillie Suburban News papers, Inc. COPYRIGHT © by LILLIE SUBURBAN NEWSPAPERS, INC. NEWS STAFF The Review’s news deadline is noon ea ch Thursday. This newspaper tries conscien tiously to report news fairly and accurately. Whe n we fall short of this objective, we welcome f eedback from our readers. Postmaster: Please send address correc tions to: Lillie Suburban Newspapers, Inc. 2515 7th Ave. E. North St. Paul, MN 55109 EXECUTIVE EDITOR Mary Lee Hagert MANAGING EDITOR Holly Wenzel STAFF WRITER Cory Streeter PRESS RELEASES Pamela O'Meara SPORTS Wally Wakefield DISPLAY ADVERTISING Holly Koep Paul Mock CIRCULATION MANAGER Laura Young PHOTOGRAPHER Linda Baumeister LAYOUT DESIGN Steve LaShomb Nik VanDenMeerendonk WEB SITE Debb Reischl Viewpoints In my husband’s world, the sky was falling. For those who wonder if it will all end with a bang or a whimper, the answer is neither. No, it just leaves a little whiff of cinnamon. Recently, the Little Trees company -- the folks who came up with the pine tree- shaped car fresheners -- changed the formula for their “spice” scent. It was a subtle change; the in-general spicy smell had taken on what wine connoisseurs would call “a distinct note” of cinnamon. My husband hated it. Now, let me explain. My husband goes with what works, and when he finds something that works, he holds on to it like a famished piranha. He likes the cologne he’s used for as long as I’ve known him. He likes Irish Spring soap and buys the bars by the dozen, just in case there’s a world shortage of Irish Spring. He likes the color red and most of his vehicles are. . . drumroll. . . red. And he likes the Little Trees “spice” air freshener. In fact, whenever his sup- ply runs low, he buys enough to rec- reate that icky scene from the movie “Seven.” That is, he liked the Little Trees “spice” air freshener. Unaware of The Change, he ripped open the cellophane on a Little Tree, and immediately looked perplexed. Then, horror-struck. He held the tree to his nose, taking deep, suspicious sniffs. Then he thrust the tree at me. “Smell this.” I did as I was told. “Mmm,” I said. “Cinnamon. Very nice.” “It’s not nice!” he gasped. “They changed the formula! This one is... is WRONG!” Since he’d purchased the air fresheners in large sup- ply, I pointed to the stack of Little Trees. “Maybe that one is past its expiration date,” I suggested. “Try a different one.” To his consternation, the second one -- and third one - - and fourth one -- all smelled like the first one. Discarding Little Trees and plastic wrappers with disdain, he stomped over to his com- puter to register an impassioned com- plaint with the Little Trees company. Of course, to me, the drama was the only jarring note in a room that now smelled pleasantly of baked apples. The Little Trees response was gra- cious: “You have a good nose; the fragrance used on the spice Little Tree air fresh- ener was recently changed. We have used the same spice fragrance since the 1950s and our market research in di- cated it was time for a change. Accord- ing to focus groups, the new fragrance is more commonly associated with the concept of spice. In fact, in side-to-side comparison tests, the new fragrance was consistently liked better than the previous fragrance. “Unfortunately, the inventory of the original spice Little Tree air freshener is depleted. However, I found one that I will send to (you).” One? Being down to half a dozen would constitute an emergency. This was something like the “Original Coke” frenzy, being enacted by just one per- son. The next logical step: to stalk the world’s remaining supply of “origi- nal” spice Little Trees. Fortunately, the Internet is a viral breeding ground for this kind of quest; with visions of spice air fresheners dancing in his head, the Spice Stalker searched near and far for online sellers who might have a few “original” spices lying around. His goal was quite specific. “I have to find enough of the originals to last me the rest of my life,” he said. I did a quick calculation. My husband is 38 years old, goes to the gym on a regular basis and hardly ever gets so much as a sniffle. He was going to need a lot of air fresheners. A few days later, the mail carrier began delivering packages of every size and from every location imaginable. The Spice Stalker opened each box lov- ingly, as a cloud of spicy-but-not-cinna- mony scent wafted through the house. He was gleeful. “I’ve got a line on a guy up north,” he said. “He’s got 50 of ‘em sitting in his store. I think he’s will- ing to make an offer.” I wondered how much of this year’s tax refund was going toward the pur- chases of spicy Little Trees. A few days later, the package from the Little Trees company arrived. Not only had the kind representative sent the last original spice air freshener, she had included a gold Little Trees sticker and a handful of air fresheners in scents like “Smooth Amber,” “Black Ice” (which makes me think of treacherous win- ter driving) “Cedar,” and something called “Oud.” (Thanks to the Internet, I discovered this was not the name of a rare disease, which had been my first assumption, but rather a perfume made from the wood of tropical agar trees.) I tried to tear open the corner of the “Oud” package to get a quick whiff, but my husband yelped, “These are collec- tor items!” He gathered up his scented loot before scuttling off to lock his precious stink- ies in our little household safe. “You have completely lost your mar- bles,” I called after him. Secretly, though, I couldn’t blame him. I still harbor a grudge against Bath and Body Works for discontinuing their honeydew melon scent nearly 20 yea rs ago. Their sweet, melon lotion smelled like summer in a bottle. Then one day, it was gone from the shelves. Oh, sure, they introduced a “cucumber melon” scent in its place, and a “melon cooler” hit the market in recent years. But it wasn’t the same. Some things, like honeydew and spice, are better left unchanged. Heather Edwards can be reached at southwest@lillienews.com. Heather Edwards Review staff Cinnamon takes the spice out of a ir freshener The benefits of being part of the herd Mary Lee Hagert executive editor MILLE LACS MESSENGER / OU T & ABOUT / DECEMBER 8, 20 10 8 Offer Expires December 10 th, 2010 FAST � EASY Christmas Shopping but we’ve got the perfect sol ution for those hard-to-buy-for pe ople on your Christmas list! WE DON’T DO CHIMNEYS... Make out your gift list an d check it twice. Fill out the coupon for th ose who’ve been nice. Now mail the coupon - o r call us today. And your local pa per will start coming your w ay. T Additional subscriptions may b e listed on separate sheet of pap erMail to: Aitkin Independent Age, P.O. Box 259, Ait kin MN 56431 or Mille Lacs Messenger, Box 26, Is le, MN 56342 Please attach your mailing label fro m the Aitkin Age or Messenger new spaper when you send this in! Please allo w two weeks for us to process you r subscription. My Name _____________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ Address _____________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ City, State, Zip _________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ Check method of payment: Signature: __________________ __________________ ____________ Telephone: ________________ _____ Expiration Date: _____________ ___ ___ _ Card Number: Start My New Sub. at reduced price Renew My Sub. at reduced price Amount Enclosed: $ ______________ Check # __________ 3 Digit Security Code (ON BACK OF CREDIT CARD) # ___________Check Money Order Send Gift Subscription for ■ Aitkin Age ■ Messenger To: Name ___________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ Address _____________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ City, State, Zip _________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ■ New ■ Renewal Send Gift Card from:_____________ _____________(optional) Send Gift Subscription for ■ Aitkin Age ■ Messenger To: Name ___________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ Address _____________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _ City, State, Zip _________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ■ New ■ Renewal Send Gift Card from:_____________ _____________(optional) YES! I want to give the gift of th e: Aitkin Independent Age Mille Lacs Messenger MasterCard Visa Discover Card 1. 2. 3. Merry Christmas from all of us at: Mille LacsMessenger Save $3.00 On EACH Gift Subscript ion, Renewal or New Subscr iption! Aitkin & Mille Lacs Count y, and Garrison, Hillman (Reg. $30) ------ $27.00 Out-of-County -----------(Reg . $35) $32.00 Out-of-State --------------(Reg . $41) $38.00 Special 2010 Christmas Rates The Perfect Gift! It’s the one that keeps on giv ing... 52 times a year! For further assistance, ca ll: The Aitkin Independent A ge at 218-927-3761 or The Mille Lacs Messen ger at 320-676-3123 & CO reports 3 Wally Finn’s ice report 3 High School Sports 4-5 Area events 6 INSIDE Mille Lacs Messenger – Wed nesday, December 8, 2010 Out About There is the rarest sort of beauty in a child’s trust and w o n d e r . It’s horrible to see it crum- ble. When I was 11 years old, my parents went to Rook Night (Poker for Evangeli- cals) and left me to babysit my sister and two younger brothers. I didn’t really babysit. Dana took care of that. We had a little nuclear sub-family. I was the dad, Dana was the mom, and Randy and Tory were the kids. I lay on the couch and read Hardy Boys novels. Dana took care of the house. She would study my mom’s instructions with care, and set the kitchen timer so she didn’t miss any appointments. She gave Randy and Tory tips while they brushed their teeth. She made my parents a sandwich for their return, and attached a short poem. I never had to do anything. When the phone rang, Dana answered. Phone calls were fairly rare in 1975, so it piqued my interest, but not enough to put down my book. My little sister called me from the kitchen. There were tears in her voice, and I jumped from the couch in a panic. I ran to the kitchen thinking someone was dead. My sister stood with the phone in her hands, her lip quivering. “He … said a bad word,” she sobbed. I took the phone from her. “Hello,” I said. “Put the girl back on,” the voice said. “Who is this?” I asked. “How old are you?” the voice replied. “I’m eleven,” I said. “Where are your par- ents?” it asked. “They’re not here,” I said. “Put the girl back on,” the voice said. “No,” I said. “Put the girl back on or I’ll come over there and kill all of you,” the voice said. “I know where you live.” I didn‘t say anything. I stood and stared at the tile of our kitchen floor. “Put the girl back on,” the voice said. “Put the girl back on.” Keep kids safe on the ice Children need adult supervision when venturing onto lakes and rivers DNR news release The Minnesota Depart- ment of Natural Resources (DNR) warns parents to caution their children to stay off ponds, streams and other water bodies that now have a thin coating of ice. “Every season, people fall through ice they thought was safe,” said Tim Smalley, DNR boat and water safety specialist. “It’s especially tragic when these incidents involve children. A quarter of those who die by falling through the ice are nine years old or younger.” As of Nov. 18, no ice in Minnesota had been report- ed by DNR conservation officers as consistently four inches thick, the minimum thickness for walking. Ice safety guidelines also rec- ommend a minimum of five inches of new, clear ice for snowmobiles, and eight to 12 inches for automobiles. Children are often sent outside to play during the holidays — while meals are prepared and presents wrapped — and they can stray onto unsafe ice. “Many years, we receive reports of children falling through ice and drowning around the holidays,” Smal- ley said. “Kids are attracted to ice like a magnet. They just don’t know how much ice it takes to support a per- son, nor what is or isn’t safe.” Smalley said children should not go out on the ice without adult supervision, even when conditions improve. The DNR recommends contacting a local bait shop or resort at the destination lake to find out if ice is safe for the planned activities. Winter sports enthusiasts can obtain a free packet of ice safety information by calling 651-296-6157 in the Twin Cities area or toll-free 888-646-6367 or e-mail boatandwater.dnr@state.m n.us. Running start Isle girls open with wins. See page 5 Passons to 5 Rob Passons Wolves in the world SUBMITTED PHOTO Three in a row Three young hunters sh ot bucks before 9:15 on opening morning of fir earms deer season at t heir Red Top hunting camp. Billy Eye , Isle, got his first deer, a 6-pointer. Travis Eye , Isle, shot an 8-pointer . Kari Metcalf, Onamia, harvested a 9- pointer. When you pull up to the lake, you should know what you’re going to do first. And what you’re going to do next if it doesn’t work. by Mark Strand Frozen lakes are not easy to catch fish from if you simply head out onto them without a plan. Planning each day on the ice is an aspect of modern ice fish- ing that many – maybe most – people overlook. Yet, after all these years of refining the sys- tem he pioneered, Dave Genz has come to appreciate “the plan” as one of the most impor- tant pieces of the puzzle. “You can have every piece of equipment, and know how to use it,” Genz said, “and you can still strike out if you just go out there without an idea of what you’re going to do.” Gathering info You don’t have to become a library rat in order to catch more fish, but it helps to spend time learning about the lake (or lakes) you’ll be fishing. Genz is a computer user, and you should be, too. He looks up information about lakes, start- ing with state or provincial agency web sites. “Learn about the size of the lake, water clarity, whether it usually has good weed growth, and what fish it has,” says Dave. “You should fish for the dominant species in the lake. If you want to go perch fishing, go to a lake that has a good perch population.” Dave has long appreciated the value of talking with fellow anglers, too, and listening to their reports. He and his friends who developed the winter fish- ing system talk about “chasing the best rumors,” which Dave enjoys doing. Rumors fly, of course, on web chat rooms, so it’s not hard to find rumors to chase. Gearing up It’s a sin to hit the ice without having your gear ready to fish with. You might be able to get away with that in the summer, because you can let the boat drift while you tie knots or tighten the trolling motor. But in the winter, working on equipment is much harder. Genz always rigs rods the night before, with several lures that he wants to try. He charges all batteries, dries out and warms up his Vexilar, heater, propane, cleans and refuels his auger, on down the line. Plan ahead for ice fishing success Ice fishing to 2 PHOTO BY DAVEGENZ.COM The plan pays off! Dave Genz with a nice b luegill that came after se veral hours of searching likely spots.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 38 Weeklies over 5,000–19 entries First Place: Thisweek Farmington/Lakeville, Larry Werner We’ve lost Gladys - a true local character; Can you take South St. Paul out of the boy?; Walmart not your choice? We’re in the minority Larry Werner’s leads and column construction were clearly the best in a large group of entries. The leads gave a hint of the column and tantalized the reader to continue. He didn’t waste words as he built to a strong conclusion. And Werner wove in some personal history and feelings without being too folksy and familiar. Very good work. Second Place: Thisweek Farmington/Lakeville, Aaron Vehling An educational visit with some neighbors; La Semana bridges cultures for adoptees; Silicon Valley success started in District 194 Aaron Vehling earned second by tackling some subjects with a little meat on the bone. Although they read like feature stories written in the first person, he captured the subjects well. All Dailies–42 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune, Sam Cook Sam Cook shows the ability to handle a wide variety of topics from anger and comfort to emotion, advice and humor. “Time of Not Enough” is the type of column I wish I’d written pointing out those in need, and the greedy people who caused our economic mess while offering us quiet comfort that we will get through it. His other two entries show personal emotion and wry humor. Cook can do it all. Second Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester, John Weiss Backroad’s columns “Fear of darkness” and “Night of Light” use description to create visceral emotion that readers can feel. The description is tight writing, each word carefully chosen. Weiss has mastered the art of understating, writing a few key words that lets the reader fill in the scene with his own memories. That’s the very best description written. Columnist CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 4A June 24, 2011 THISWEEK ������ ������� ���� ������� ���� ������� ���� �� �� ��� ����� ���� ��� ��� ���� ���� �� ������������������� ��� ���� ���� ��� ����������� �������������� ����� �� ��� ������������������������� ����� ��� �� ��������� ������� ��� ������� ���������� ���������� ������������������� ��������������� ������������� �� Opinion On the record To the editor: You sent a representa- tive to my office to check on my credentials. What he found blew his mind but when asked if he was going to make a featured story out of it he said he didn’t think so. It didn’t bother me but I was amazed that you would decline to make notice of one of the world’s top pro- ducers, military men and sports stars. You have to be kidding but it only goes to show how dysfunctional the news is that we do get. FRANKLIN WICKER Lakeville Seek dental care from any licensed provider To the editor: “Practitioners overstate case for practicing den- tistry” brought more infor- mation regarding the new mid-level provider, a dental therapist, but has still left the topic incomplete. I too am a practicing dentist in a community health center that serves primarily underinsured and uninsured individuals consider it important to detail further information. It is good that the writer agrees that there is a short- age of dentists willing to treat low-income patients. If there is a shortage for whatever reason then ac- tion will be taken to rectify the situation. I testified on behalf of dentistry to the State House Health and Human Services commit- tee this past March. I be- lieve that eating properly and having the ability to ef- fectively chew proper nutri- tion is important to health. Further validating the im- portance of dentistry is that research is showing a link between periodontal (gum) disease and diabetes, heart disease and pregnan- cy problems. This past May, the Min- nesota Dental Association introduced legislation to the state Senate rescinding their earlier (2009) agreed position that dental thera- pists be allowed to have their own office under a collaborating agreement with a dentist. The intent of the law is to allow mid- level providers to go to underserved areas and im- prove access. The Minne- sota Dental Association’s position would have ham- pered access. A few other points to consider regarding the writer’s viewpoint. Chil- dren do miss millions of hours nationally due to dental pain and infection. More importantly is the fact they are just plain suffering. In my practice 99 percent of my patients are low or no-income. By far the major reason they don’t seek dental care is due to a lack of insurance, finances or dental offices won’t let them in. At the University of Minnesota the dental therapists are taught and graded to the same standard as the den- tal students. To answer the question posed by the writer: “So, come on, who do you re- ally want to be doing work in your mouth?” For those that have run into the ob- stacles put forward by dentists the answer is: any Letters Letters to the editor policy Thisweek Newspapers welcomes letters to the editor. Submitted letters must be no more than 350 words. All letters must have the author’s phone number and address for verification pur poses. Anonymous letters will not be accepted. Letters reflect the o pinion of the author only. Thisweek New spapers reserves the right to edit all letters. Submission of a letter does not guarantee publication. Thisweek Farmington Lakeville Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julian An dersen President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Marge Win kelman General Manager/Editor . . . . . . Larry Werner Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . Tad J ohnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John G essner Assistant Managing Editor . . . . Erin J ohnson Farmington Editor . . . . . . . . Laura Ad elmann Lakeville Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron V ehling Thisweekend Editor . . . . . . . . . Andrew Miller Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rick O rndorf Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy Rogers Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mike J etchick Production/Office Manager . . . Ellen R eierson Contact us at: FARMINGTON NEWS: farmington.t hisweek@ecm-inc.com LAKEVILLE NEWS: lakeville.thiswee k@ecm-inc.com SPORTS: sportswriter.thisweek@ecm-in c.com AD SALES: ads.thisweek@ecm-inc.com PRODUCTION: graphics.thisweek@ec m-inc.com BURNSVILLE OFFICE 12190 County Road 11 Burnsville, MN 55337 952-894-1111 fax: 952-846-2010 www.thisweeklive.com Office Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. M-Th, 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Friday Thisweek Columnist by Larry Werner THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS If you’ve spent any time commuting north on I-35 from south of Lakeville, you’ve probably seen the submarine. It sits up there on the hillside near a sign for “Hot Sam’s Antiques.” Word is that Gladys Hood, owner of Hot Sam’s, was offered $5,000 for that old sub years ago, but she decided it was worth more to her as a magnet for attracting motorists to her business that is as much theme park as antique shop. That submarine drew me years ago off I-35 onto the frontage road and into the swampy, wooded Hot Sam’s complex, where I got to meet one of the area’s true characters. I decided to share some thoughts about Gladys after seeing her obituary in our paper last week. She died at 84 on Dec. 21, and her son, Bobby, placed a notice in the paper for a memorial service on Sun- day. If you’ve never been to Hot Sam’s, you’ve missed an antique business unlike anything anywhere. If you never met Gladys, you’ll get a sense from her place how inter- esting she was. I wandered into Hot Sam’s one day while I was exploring the pos- sibility of going into the antique business. I had some space in a commercial building in downtown Lakeville, and I was looking for some mentoring. At the end of the long drive that ends at the log cabin where Gladys lived among thousands of collectibles she bought and sold, I got more mentoring than I was seeking. A small woman with dark hair and a big smile told me to sit down, poured me a drink and told me her story. Actually, she read me her story from a Pioneer Press article that had been written about her – a retired race-car driver who got into antiques because she needed something to do while car- ing for her disabled ex-husband. That ex-husband died, but Gladys kept buying more antiques to sell out of the cluttered log cab- in and old box cars and out build- ings on the rolling, wooded 10-acre lot. Bobby, her son and business partner, wasn’t so much into old furniture and trinkets. He bought big things, like the 25-foot submarine, old tax- is, planes and a replica of the Statue of Liberty hold- ing a globe light instead of a torch. After I arranged to take some of Gladys’s furniture for sale in my building, my wife and I would stop by with our son, who loved to roam the property and gawk at things you normally don’t see all in one place. I learned from Gladys that her business not only attracted antique lovers and families looking for a fun outing, but also theater groups that rent the oversize furniture and odd novelties as props for plays. When Gladys was there, she dominated the conversation with her stories about her career driv- ing race cars and her love of air shows. When she was gone to one of those air shows in Red Wing or Oshkosh, Bobby would talk about his winter travels to places warm where he found biplanes and Don- ald Duck teeter-totters to bring home to Minnesota. Gladys is gone, but her eccen- tric personality lives on at the busi- ness her son will continue to oper- ate. And if you’ve always wanted a submarine for the backyard, may- be you can convince Bobby to part with it. Larry Werner is editor and general manager of the Dakota County Tri- bune and Thisweek Newspapers. He can be reached at larry.werner@ ecm-inc.com. Columns reflect the opinion of the author. We’ve lost Gladys – a true local char acter Gladys Hood trained and licensed practi- tioner that is willing to let them in their dental chair to care for their needs. BRIAN QUINLAN Lakeville Impressed by hiring process so far To the editor: I want to take a moment to commend both the Farm- ington School Board and Farmington City Council for the processes they have established to bring forward new leadership to each re- spective organization. While we do not yet have a new superintendent or a city administrator both the board and council have at- tracted outstanding can- didates on paper with the possibility of future success appearing likely. Both the board and council have taken the ap- proach that public comment and input is important and this is highly commendable given the history in Farm- ington. I understand how critical it is for the board to hire a candidate who is ready to take Farmington students to the next level of academ- ic achievement and provide support to our high quality teachers and administrative staff. I also know first-hand how critical it is to have a city administrator ready to partner with the council and the city as a whole to achieve their goals and fu- ture success. While the results of up- coming hiring decisions will not likely be known for a year or more down the road, I am very excited about the new leadership and hope other Farmington and Lakeville residents will be as well. I am hopeful that these two new leaders will build strong community partnerships that will reap positive benefits for many years to come. STEVE WILSON Farmington Editor’s note: The writer is a former Farmington City Council member. Stop stomping on other people’s dreams To the editor: There is an old saying “Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner.” This saying always comes to mind when I hear about proposed bans on gay marriage. Advocating for the acceptance of gay marriage is not my battle. My battle is trying to get people to take a step back and quit stomping on each other’s dreams. We are all in the minority sometimes. Last summer, I stopped at a house where a retired man was selling his wood- working crafts out on his lawn. We got to talking and he explained to me that he would like to do that every weekend, but can’t because a neighbor turned him in for violating a city ordinance about how many garage sales a house- hold can have per year. Re- ally? Someone was bitter enough to turn in a friend- ly elderly man for enjoying his hobby and finding an excuse to socialize on the weekends? My mother just moved out of her rental house in Arizona because her neighbors noticed she had a lot of house guests and turned her in for running a bed and breakfast without a license. Her neighbor was forced to take down an arbor he made – after obtaining explicit permis- sion from his landlord and spending a lot of time and money – because a single neighbor complained that they didn’t like it. The Republicans tout themselves as a party that encompasses the libertar- ians, yet they continually head measures like the cur- rent vote to ban gay mar- riage, ask the public to accept reductions in civil liberty for their safety, and refuse to recognize the hu- manity or “inalienable” rights of any non-USA citizens. The Democrats aren’t much better with their pro- posals to censor media and insistence on gun control. We are digging our own graves. Everyone is wear- ing a choke collar and holding someone else’s leash. If you’re feeling a little claustrophobic like me, consider voting against the constitutional ban on gay marriage, even if you don’t have a personal stake in the outcome. MACIE KORTE Eagan News Tribune staff A new exhibit opens at the LakeSuperior Zoo today. The interactive “Future ofFrogs” highlights the impact frogshave on our ecosystems and thedelicate future of the world’s frogpopulation. “The exhibits are wonderful,they’re beautiful,” curator PeterPruett said. “For me this is one ofthose exhibits that you can stand infront of for hours while learningwhy they are frontline indicatorsfor the overall health of our ecosys-tems.” Frogs and toads have an oftenoverlooked affect on the world. In-dividuals of some species eat up to5,000 bugs in a year. Hatched andliving in water before transforminginto air-breathing land dwellers,they can serve as the proverbial ca-nary in the coal mine, warning ofunsafe conditions by their own ill-ness or death. Of the world’s approximately6,000 species of amphibians, a third are threatened with extinction,Pruett said. “They believe 165 species havegone extinct,” he said.In North America, theWyomingtoad is extinct in the wild, its fu-ture in the hands of a few zoos andother facilities involved in captivebreeding programs.To help teach people about frogsand toads, the Animal Interaction Design Group created the travelingFuture of Frogs exhibit. It will beon display in the Lake SuperiorZoo’s primate center until mid-September. The exhibit includes separatedisplays containing fire-belliedtoads fromAsia, Vietnamesemossy frogs, White’s tree frogsfromNewGuinea and Australia,yellow banded dart frogs from South America and American bull-frogs. Interactive components in-clude a kiosk featuring audio andvisual clips of eight frog species,another kiosk on the reasons forthe decline in frog populations, apuzzle table that teaches childrenabout what frogs eat, and a floorjumping game teaching childrenabout the survival challenges frogsface daily. We seem to be living in theTime of Not Enough. Notenough jobs. Not enoughmoney to fix our streets. Notenoughmoney to run ourschools. We will try to forget theprimary reason we arrivedat this place, how the greedof a relative few causedlarge-scale financial collapsein the housing industry, andthen the banking industry,finally sending ripplesthroughout the world. Wewill try to forget that thosegreedy few suffered almostno consequences for theiractions that the rest of usmust now cope with. We will try, but it isn’teasy to forget that. Now, wemust find a wayto forge on in the Time ofNot Enough, and it isn’tpretty. When resources arelimited, when all of the fixesare painful, we all growmore territorial. Wemoreeasily blame.We slip readilyinto the us-and-themmental-ity. And that’s just here athome, in our democracy.Here, at least, we can dis-agree, for themost part,without violence. Around the world, wheredictators rule, where youngpeople without jobs havehad enough, they spill intothe streets and rise up inprotest, risking their livesbecause they have nothingleft to lose in their Time ofNot Enough. And some ofthem are shot dead. And yet, despite the cloudof too little hanging over ourheads, we try to forge on. Webring new children into anunsettled world. We rushfromwork to haul the girlsto dance class. We work theconcession stand at thehockey tournament. Weforgo dinner out, make tuna-noodle casserole and read tothe little ones before bed-time. Even in the Time of NotEnough, most of us try to dothe right thing. A friend Iknowwas just elected treas-urer of her township. Asmall thing, perhaps, in thescope of our present reality,but she is stepping up, doingher part, taking her turn.Aman I know retiressooner than he wishes duelargely to worries over hisfuture retirement benefits.His work is not finished. Helikes his job in the naturalresources world. But in avolatile political climate, hecannot risk giving up whathe has coming. He hasmade a difference,brought about change thathas benefited the anglingpublic. That is the best mostof us can hope for. We arenot likely to change theworld. But we can changeone river, or one forest, orone community. That, I guess, is howweendure the Time of NotEnough while we hope for atime when things are better.We let go of what we cannotcontrol. We step forwardwhere we canmake a differ-ence. We do child care forour kids’ kids. We take foodto the old people. We writechecks that will build homesfor those who need them.And, somehow, we trynot to let the Time of NotEnough drag us down.Weremember to take care ofourselves. We slip away togently moving waters. Wewatch the birds. We take inthe returning light. We will get through this. SAM COOK is a Duluth NewsTribune columnist and out-doors writer. Reach him at(218) 723-5332 or scook@duluthnews.com. Fol-low him on Twitter at “sam-cookoutdoors.” Local News  obituaries  planner  classifieds B DuluthNewsTribune | Friday,March 11, 2011 Sam Cook The cloud of too little will lift Coyotes roamed in Two Harbors near Agate Bay last week,causing a minor stir when they were mistaken for wolves bymany. Wolf sightings are growing more common in the city, awildlife expert says. Photo submitted by Dale Moe Zoodisplay highlights frogs’ plight Coyotes raise hackles in Two HarborsMATT SUOJA msuoja@lcnewschronicle.com What was thought to be a wolf invasionnear Agate Bay in Two Harbors last weekprobably was a group of coyotes. Eyewit-nesses took pictures of the creatures andthey were examined by wildlife experts.The buzz created brought onmore talkabout the prevalence of wolves in LakeCounty. Bob Kirsch, the Department of NaturalResources area wildlife manager in TwoHarbors, said the pictures from theWhiskey Row archeology site appeared to be of brush wolves— coyotes— and theDepartment of Agriculture’s Animal Con-trol division concurred.Kirsch said they have been seen over athree-week period. Kirsch said he has re-ceived a report of a gray wolf near thePamida and Super One area this winterand he believes there probably are otherwolves lingering about the city.“I think a lot of people take it forgranted that there are wolves around sothey are not reporting when they seethem,” Kirsch said. See Coyotes, Page B2 A White’s tree frog is part of the “Future of Frogs” display at the Lake Superior Zoo. The exhibit opens today and continues until mid-September. A native of New Guinea and Australia, the White’s tree frog can live 15 to 20 years. Photos by Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com DON DAVIS State Capitol Bureau ST. PAUL—Republicans wouldspend $3 billion less than DemocratMark Dayton while increasing educa-tion and health spending slightly, butanother two weeks’ worth of legislativecommittee work is needed beforeMin-nesotans know how the GOP budgetwill look. “There is muchmore that you don’tknow than you do know by seeing theseraw numbers,” SenateMinority LeaderTomBakk, DFL-Cook, said Thursdayafter examining an outline of how Re-publicans would spend $34 billion overthe next two years. Republican leaders repeatedly de-flected reporters’ questions about spe-cific spending plans, saying they would let their committees make those deci-sions. For instance, Republicans said theywant nearly $11 billion for health andhuman services programs in the nextbudget, a 5 percent to 6 percent increasefrom current spending. But other thansaying some health-care programs willget moremoney and some less, GOPleaders would not be specific about howfunding would be divided, but saidnursing homes are a priority.HouseMajority LeaderMatt Dean,R-Dellwood, said there will be “realcuts” if the GOP budget is enacted.He and House Speaker Kurt Zellers,R-Maple Grove, promised a $300 milliontax cut for low- andmiddle-incomeMin-nesotans. Senate Republicans said theywould give businesses a tax break, butdid not say how big a break it would be.Republicans also generally agreedthat the state would send less money tolocal governments than in the past, butsaid howmuch those payments are cutis up to committee members. GOP seeks billions in cuts, details fewRepublicans in theMinnesotaHousewould spend$3billionless thanGov.MarkDayton,withdetails to come later See Budget, Page B4 A yellow-banded dart frog fromSouth America is one of severalspecies of frogs and toads includedin the “Future of Frogs” exhibit at theLake Superior Zoo. Landon Doffing, 5, of Hudson, Wis., tries one of the interac- tive displays in the “Future of Frogs” display at the Lake Su- perior Zoo on Thursday. Be- yond him is a display case holding fire-bellied toads from Asia. LISA BAUMANN lbaumann@duluthnews.com Duluth City Councilorswill vote Monday onwhether to approve two zon-ing requests that could affecta Duluth business ownertrying to build a hotel onPark Point. Joel Johnson, who ownsLakehead Boat Basin Inc.,wants to rezone a portion ofhis land from industrial tomixed-use waterfront,which could clear the wayfor a hotel and perhaps addi-tional retail or restaurantdevelopment on the prop-erty. In January, he wonunanimous approval for themeasure from the DuluthPlanning Commission.But, on Tuesday, thePlanning Commission voted5-3 to recommend the CityCouncil approve rezoningland just across the streetfrom the hotel project. Itwould rezone land fromMinnesota Avenue to theLake Avenue alley betweenEighth Street and 11th Street frommixed use/businesspark (MU-B) to residential-traditional (R-1). Those who voted in favorincluded commissionersDrew Digby, Henry Banks,Terry Guggenbuehl,Heather Rand and DavidSarvela. Many said rezoningthat area would bring it intocompliance with the city’sComprehensive Land UsePlan, which identifies thearea as traditional neighbor-hood. CommissionersMike Ak-ervik, Frank Holappa andJohn Vigen voted againstthe measure, citing concernsabout the impact it wouldhave on existing businessesin the 10th Street to 11thStreet area. Some of Johnson’s landwould be affected by the re-zoning and, if the measurepasses, it could take awayhis option of future commer-cial development there. Italso could affect the size andscope of his hotel plans. ParkPoint rezoninggoes toMonday vote See Rezone, Page B4
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 39  Weeklies up to 1,500–17 entries First Place: Citizen’s Advocate, Henning, Chad Koenen One year later . . . work continues in Almora The photographer filled the frame with information that was key to the story. The positioning of the subjects helps offer a point of reference to how big the devastation still is in this community. Second Place: Tri-County News, Kimball, Danielle Brower Fatal accident claims life of Watkins man Even without reading the caption, this image tells a strong story. The framing (with the skid marks in the foreground) make it clear this was an accident and the corresponding elements (law enforcement, tractor trailer) make it clear is was a serious accident. Good access by the photographer to have gotten so close to the scene. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–19 entries First Place: Hinckley News, Ailene Croup Truck train collision, Dumpster full of milk Right place. Right time. Well-composed photos. Second Place: Maple Lake Messenger, Theresa Andrus Teen critically injured in first of two Friday crashes on Hwy. 55 Action that puts the reader on the scene. Honorable Mention: Lake County News-Chronicle, Two Harbors, Brittany Berrens PIERRE MADE WHOLE AGAIN . . . SORT OF Black and white photos STILL have a place in newspapers. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–23 entries First Place: Park Rapids Enterprise, Connie Carmichael Family escapes early fire Wednesday Photo is awesome! Captured impact of scene. Great angle and good play on page. Second Place: Hastings Star Gazette, Chad Richardson Friends, family build Adam Stein memorials Strong emotional impact. Looked for the right angle and found it. Nice job. News Photo Hinckley News IN SHORT (320) 384-6188 • e-mail: hinckleynews@scicable.com • 75¢ THURSDAY January 27, 2011 Hinckley News OFFICE CLOSEDJANUARY 27& 28The Hinckey News of-fice will be closed forstaff training Jan. 27 and28, 2011. DATE SET FORNEIGHBORHOODWATCH A Neighborhood Watchmeeting will be held onFeb. 3, 2011, at 7 p. m., inthe Community Roomat Hinckley City Hall.Everyone is welcome. ANNUAL LIONSWAFFLE DINNERThe annual Lions WaffleDinner will be held Fri-day, Feb. 11, 2011 from4:30 to 7 p.m. at Hinck-ley-Finlayson HighSchool just prior to thegame between HF andEast Central. There willbe a free will offeringwith proceeds going tothe City of Hinckleyrecreation programswith some of the fundsraised being matched byThrivent Financial forLutherans. FOOD SHELVESFOOD HELP- Ruby's Pantry, ThirdWednesday, HinckleyCommunity Center, 102Dunn Ave. N, Hinckley.www.rubyspantry.org,e - m a i l :goodnews@rubyspantry.org or call (320) 629-7400. - Feed My Sheep FoodMinistry, 6:30 a.m., firstSaturday of each monthat Memorial Drive BibleFellowship, PO Box 127,67331 St Hwy 23,Askov, MN 55704.Phone: 320-838-3733.- Family Pathways FoodShelf, 321 Fire Monu-ment Rd., Hinckley.Phone: 320-384-7426.Serving Hinckley andBrook Park. Monday:Noon - 6 p.m., Wednes-day: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m., Sat-urday: 9 a.m. - Noon.Please Call for an ap-pointment. Go towww.familypathways.org for more info.- Family Pathways FoodShelf - 312 Main St, P.O.Box 331, Sandstone.Phone: 320-245-2485.Hours: Tuesday 9 a.m. -3 p.m., Wednesday,noon-5 p.m., Thursday, 9a.m. - 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9a.m. - Noon. ServesNorthern Pine County.- Quamba Food Shelf,26340 Whited, BrookPark, MN 55007. Phone:320-679-5365. PINEWOOD DERBYThe public is invited tothe Pinewood Derbywhich will be held at theHinckley CommunityCenter January 29, 2011at 10 a.m. From the ashes, the biggest little town and best little paper between the Twin Cities and the Twin Ports OBITUARIES. - Virgil Campbell, 63,Pine City See full obituaries, Page 2. INSIDE Snow Week Schedule • Page 5 Thursday Jan. 27, 2011 Partly sunny, High 28 Check weekend weather Page 2. Carlton County Hunting Land Starting At $995/acre!Land & Cabins, LLC320-384-6488 Landcabins.com 109 Court Ave., S. Sandstone 320.245.2211www.pinemedicalcenter.org The soul and science of healing Urgent Care HoursMonday - Friday 4-9 pm . Saturday - 9 am - 9 pmSundays and Holidays - 1-9 pmEmergency Department services 7 days a week,24 hours a day. RR-xing site of second accident in three years Ailene Croup Road conditions may havebeen a factor in the secondtrain/vehicle accident in threeyears at 5th Ave. S.W. where itcrosses the railroad tracks in Hen-riette at about noon on Monday.Richard Hooker, 43, a residentof Brook Park who was driving awhite pickup truck, approachedthe crossing from the west headinginto the town and was hit by anorthbound Burlington NorthernSanta Fe (BNSF) train. The train pushed the truck ap-proximately a quarter of a mileand stopped about 300 feet pastthe Henriette Road and BNSFcrossing on the north end oftown. Pine Medical Center ambu-lance, Pine City Fire Department,Pine County Sheriff's Departmentand LifeLink III responded to theaccident. Pine County Sheriff RobinCole said the train engineer sawthe truck approach the tracks andtried to stop the train but the pick-up truck slid in front of the train.Hooker was seriously injuredand taken by LifeLink III heli-copter to Hennepin County Med-ical Center. There is no crossing arm orsignal at the 5th Ave. crossing.In December 2007, a 1988Camero was struck by a south-bound BNSF train after the driver,heading east across the tracks on5th ave. S.W., was unable to stopdue to icy road conditions.Though the vehicle was damaged,the driver was uninjured. Monday afternoon, both roadsinto Henriette were blocked forhours while the Sheriff's Depart-ment waited for BNSF investiga-tors to arrive at the scene. Hooker's condition was un-known as of press time. Ailene Croup Newly elected Pine CountySheriff Robin Cole had a list ofitems to present to the countyboard at last week's regular meet-ing. The board moved all items totheir Committee of the Wholewhich meets on the last Tuesday ofthe month. He was able to give a report onchanges and progress in the Sher-iff's Department during the regularmeeting much of which had to dowith charges for patrol car repairsand rotation of wreckers in thecounty. They are used when carsmust be towed and stored.He plans to meet with qualifiedwreckers in the county and wantsthe rotation to be fair. Board member Doug Carlsonasked how many qualified wreckerswere in Pine County. Cole said nine that he knows ofand others are interested, "But, wecan't call and call and call. Theyhave to be available 24/7." Board member Steve Hallanasked how that would changethings. "I don't want a deputy broker-ing service," Cole said. Hallan questioned whether thathad actually happened in the past."It has been," said board mem-ber Steve Chaffee. Cole told the board he didn'twant to talk about what had hap-pened in the past only that it wouldnot be happening in the future. Headded that the chief complaintfrom wreckers had been that whenthey listen to a call and know theyare next on the list, they show up atthe scene and get called off be-cause another wrecker has handledthe call. Patrol car maintenance A $65 oil change and $35 wind-shield wiper replacement is not ac-ceptable, Cole said. Patrol cars willbe taken to the county repair facil-ity for maintenance. Each patrol car is going to have the same standard equipment.Many don't. Training must bepreapproved so deputies are beingtrained in what the county needs,he added. Cole met with Warden ScottFisher at Sandstone Federal Cor-rection Institution (FCI) thismonth and asked the board to sup-port the prison with a letter writingcampaign. The prison, which em-ployees 250 people, is 80 years old.At 100 years old, they begin theprocess of closing the facility, Coletold the board. Board member Mitch Pangerloffered to join the prison commit-tee noting the major employmentopportunity offered by the FCI.Cole said the prison is a won-derful resource for the sheriff's of-fice, a place were services such aswelding are free. Carlson said the Sandstone FCIis a well maintained facility whichhas always been supported by thecommunity. He said he'd like tohave the Committee of the Wholevisit there. Fisher would welcome it, Colesaid. Sheriff plans to monitor wreckerrotation, patrol car maintenance ‘ I don’ t want a deputy brokering serv i ce ’ - Sher i f f Robin Cole Ailene Croup Committee of the WholeThe county board, elected officials and department heads met at 10 a.m., on Tuesday Jan. 25, 2011 to discuss the reorganization ofthe, now combined, Treasurer/Auditor's office and the sheriff's de- partment under the new sheriff. Both items were removed from theregular agenda at the January 18 regular meeting to be discussed at the Committee of the Whole (COW).Though there is a quorum, no votes can be taken at the month- ly COW meeting. Auditor Cathy Clemmer asked for job classification/lanechanges for some employees in the combined departments whichinclude increases in pay. Board members Steve Chaffee and Mitch Pangerl want the pro- posed deputy auditor and treasure to be accountable to the board.Clemmer said they always have been. Looking at how other counties with combined departments do their staffing has been her guide to the reorganization.Pangerl said he'd like to see fewer problems noted from theState Auditor concerning the county's audit report. He also said it was "scary" to look at the treasurer/auditor staff with the proposedposition changes and see four managers of the seven total employ- ees in that department. His suggestion was a combined treasur- er/auditor deputy. Board member Steve Hallan said, "I think Cathy needs this andwe've been talking about it for years." Auditor, sheriff say new positions mean efficiency POSITIONS Page 6 NEWS.pg1afront:08.01.06.NEWS.p1a 1/25/11 9:52 PM Page 1 Wrestlers wrap up Mid-State honors Sports, Page 1B Park Rapids Park Rapids Enterp rise General info....(21 8) 732-3364 Fax.......................(21 8) 732-8757 203 Henrietta A ve. No., Park Rapids, MN 56470 CONTACT US ONLINE Heartland Concert Guitarist Edgar C ruz will perform Bach, B eethoven, Beatles and Big Band music Friday – P age 11A EnterpriseGiving information life! www.parkrapidsen terprise.com Park Rapids ■ New Web poll Vote at www.pa rkrapidsenterpris e.com OFFICIAL VOIC E OF THE MISS ISSIPPI HEADW ATERS! CONNIE CARMI CHAEL / ENTER PRISE Food shelf usage continues to rise Family escapes f ire early Wednes day ■ Now playing Click on “Market place” for videos , special deals and a local business director y. ENTERTAINMENT Girl Scouts dr op a line Jason and Chuck Durham lend a hand whe n fledgling fisherki ds head out on the ice – P age 9A OUTDOORS SATURDAY FEB. 5, 2011 For home deliver y, call (218) 732- 3364 / $100 BY SARAH SMI TH sarahs@parkrap idsenterprise.co m Brian Halik sh udders to think what mig ht have hap- pened if he hadn’t gone bowling Tuesd ay night. After arriving home, he heard his fire place crack- ling. Only it wasn’t the fire- place. It was th e walls of his Lake Peysensk e home. The fireplace had ig nited them. Three-dozen f irefighters and trucks from Park Rapids and Nevis desc ended on the home at 12:25 a .m. Wednes- day. Temperat ures were 20 below zero wit h wind chills nearly 40 below . The home, at the inter- section of Ev ening Drive and Evening L ane in south central Hubb ard County, was totally eng ulfed. It had taken only mo ments, Brian Halik said. The family, Bri an, Sarah, three kids and pets, all got out safely. The Haliks hav e been be- sieged with off ers of help. “There are so m any peo- ple out there t hat are more deserving,” Bri an Halik said Thursday. If people feel t he need to donate, they sh ould give to a charity, he ur ged. “We are fully in sured,” he said, “We hav e a place to live. We went to Walmart that night a nd bought clothes for the kids. We have replacement” i nsurance, he said. Above, Dan Viga ra, talks with six th grade studen ts about mechan ical engineering and manufactur ing work with TEAM Industries for Science Day, organized by Hu bbard County 4-H . The conference was designed to introduce sixth grade students t o a variety of oc cupations that re quire science, tec hnology, enginee ring and math (S TEM) skills as part of their wor k. Below, Trevor Gwiazdon and Pe rry Melbo discus s their work with Itasca-Mantrap Electric Coop- erative. Other pr esenters represe nted 360 Manuf acturing and Ap plied Engineering Center of Excel lence, the Park Rapids Enterpris e, Hoffman Elect ric and the Soil a nd Water Conser vation District. Sixth graders lear n how to prepare f or science, techno logy occupations PHOTOS BY AN NA ERICKSON / ENTERPRISE See Fire Page 5A City of Park Rapids sees building growt h BY JEAN RUZIC KA jruzicka@parkra pidsenterprise.c om If the Hubbar d County Food Shelf op erated as a conventional business, Standard and Poor’s would be lauding its p rogress. In the past 10 years, usage of the fo od shelf has increased annu ally by 10 to 15 percent. Last year, the food shelf distributed 182 tons of food, a 36 percent in crease from 2009. “A good share of it is be- cause of a chan ge in govern- ment regulatio ns,” director Dave Long exp lained. Beginning in October 2010, food she lves were re- quired to distr ibute food to families and i ndividuals a minimum of o nce a month if they received government surplus food. Distribution h ad been four times a ye ar; the Hub- bard County Food Shelf board decided to limit dis- tribution to on ce a month, unless referr al agencies deemed a grea ter need. Last year, the Hubbard County Food Shelf had BY ANNA ERICK SON aerickson@parkra pidsenterprise.co m Project valua tions in Park Rapids we re up in 2010 compared to 2 009 City planner D an Walker has completed a 2010 year- end report fo r the Park Rapids Plann ing Depart- ment. “The economy played a significant role in the num- ber of requests we received in 2010,” Walke r said in the report. “I pred icted at the beginning of t he year that development a ctivity would be similar to 2009, which was the case fo r 2010.” However, the re was a slight overall in crease in the building activi ty (by permit valuation) fo r the year, which was a p ositive sign, he said. The total val uation of projects was u p by 16 per- cent in 2010 a lthough the total number of building permits issued was lower than in 2009. “I am cautiou sly opti- mistic to say t hat we have leveled off and I expect de- velopment act ivity to con- tinue to slow ly recover,” Walker said. See Food shelf Pa ge 5A See Building Page 5A The fire at Brian H alik’s Lake Peysens ke home spread qu ickly into an infern o. Cold, snow and h illy terrain hamper ed Park Rapids and Nevis firefighters , who were there fi ve hours. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE  news Page 2 • Monday, June 20, 2 011 Pain Relief for Childbirth &ƌŽŵ�ƚŚĞ�ŵŽƐƚ�ƌŽƵƟŶĞ�ďŝƌƚŚƐ�ƚŽ�ƚŚĞ�ŵŽƐƚ�ĐŽŵ ƉůĞdž͕�ǁĞ�ĂƌĞ�ƌĞĂĚLJ� ƚŽ�ƚĂŬĞ�ĐĂƌĞ�ŽĨ�ĞǀĞƌLJ�ŵŽƚŚĞƌ�ǁŚŽ�ĚĞůŝǀĞƌƐ�ŚĞƌ �ďĂďLJ�Ăƚ�dƌŝͲ�ŽƵŶƚLJ� ,ŽƐƉŝƚĂů͘�>ĂďŽƌ�ĂŶĚ�ĐŚŝůĚďŝƌƚŚ�ĐĂŶ�ďĞ�ǀĞƌLJ�ƵŶƉ ƌĞĚŝĐƚĂďůĞ�ĂŶĚ�ƚŚĞ� ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ�ĐĂŶ�ďĞ�ĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚ�ďĞƚǁĞĞŶ�ĞĂĐŚ�ǁŽ ŵĂŶ�ĂŶĚ�ďĞƚǁĞĞŶ� ĞĂĐŚ�ƉƌĞŐŶĂŶĐLJ͘ �/ƚ�ŝƐ�ŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚ�ƚŽ�ŬŶŽǁ�LJŽƵ�Ɛ ŚŽƵůĚ�ŶĞǀĞƌ�ĨĞĞů� ŐƵŝůƚLJ�ĂďŽƵƚ�ĂƐŬŝŶŐ�ĨŽƌ�ƉĂŝŶ�ƌĞůŝĞĨ�ĚƵƌŝŶŐ�ůĂďŽ ƌ�ĂŶĚ�ĐŚŝůĚďŝƌƚŚ͘ tĞ�ƌĞĂůŝnjĞ�ƚŚĞ�ďŝƌƚŚ�ŽĨ�LJŽƵƌ�ĐŚŝůĚ�ǁŝůů�ďĞ�ŽŶĞ �ŽĨ�ƚŚĞ�ŵŽƐƚ� ŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚ�ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞƐ�ŝŶ�LJŽƵƌ�ůŝĨĞ͘�tĞ�ĂƌĞ�Đ ŽŵŵŝƩĞĚ�ƚŽ�ŵĂŬŝŶŐ� ƚŚŝƐ�ĞǀĞŶƚ�ĂƐ�ƐĂĨĞ�ĂŶĚ�ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ�ĂƐ�ƉŽƐƐŝď ůĞ�ĨŽƌ�LJŽƵ�ĂŶĚ�LJŽƵƌ� ďĂďLJ͘ �KďƐƚĞƚƌŝĐ�ĂŶĞƐƚŚĞƐŝĂ�ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ�ĂƌĞ�ĂǀĂŝů ĂďůĞ�Ϯϰ�ŚŽƵƌƐͲĂͲĚĂLJ͕ � ƐĞǀĞŶ�ĚĂLJƐͲĂͲǁĞĞŬ͕�ƚŽ�ƉƌŽǀŝĚĞ�ƐƉĞĐŝĂůŝnjĞĚ�ĐĂ ƌĞ�ĨŽƌ�LJŽƵ͘ Other obstetrics services: ͻ� tĂƚĞƌ��ŝƌƚŚƐ ͻ� hƉĚĂƚĞĚ��ŝƌƚŚŝŶŐ�^ƵŝƚĞƐ� ͻ� WŽƐƚƉĂƌƚƵŵ�,ŽŵĞ�sŝƐŝƚ ͻ� &Z���ŝƚĞŵƐ�ĨŽƌ�ŵŽƚŚĞƌ�ĂŶĚ�ĨĂŵŝůLJ CLINICS | COMMUNITY HE ALTH SERVICES | HOSPITAL | LONG-TERM CARE | S PECIALTY CARE Tri-County Health CareTri-County Health Care With Clinics in:��ĞƌƚŚĂ͕�,ĞŶŶŝŶŐ͕�KƩĞƌƚĂŝů͕�^Ğď ĞŬĂ͕�tĂĚĞŶĂ ϰϭϱ�:ĞīĞƌƐŽŶ�^ƚƌĞĞƚ�EŽƌƚŚ�ͻ�tĂĚĞŶĂ͕�DE 218-631-3510 or toll-free 1-8 00-631-1811 ǁǁǁd͘ƌŝ�ŽƵŶƚLJ,ŽƐƉŝƚĂů͘ŽƌŐ It’s about ... DeliveringMiracles! School Reunion. So it was decided that six years would fall between reunions, guarantee- ing that different classes would have to share an all school reunion. Behind the scenes of the big event is a group known as the Steering Committee. On October 6 last fall the committee had the fi rst meeting to prepare for the upcoming reunion. Dave Holmgren is chairman of the com- mittee. He was part of the Henning High School graduating class of 1950 and has been with the committee since the be- ginning in 1992. Rita Ellenson is the address chairperson of the Steering Committee. It is her job to keep track of all of the addresses where newsletters and reunion packets need to be sent. For Ellenson, being the keeper of ad- dresses is a constant and year-long process. As people move and change where they live, Ellen- son’s list of addresses must change as well. She was in Henning’s gradu- ating class of 1953 and, like Holmgren, has been on the committee since 1992. Shari Haberer serves as treasurer of the Steer- ing Committee, recently taking over for her moth- er Kathy Cloeter. Both Haberer and Cloeter are Henning alumni— Cloeter from the class of 1950 and Haberer from the class of 1983. Terry Oscarson has been a teacher in Hen- ning since 1975. She is one of the founders of the H-545 Foundation and the community’s Dollars for Scholars Pro- gram, which grants nu- merous scholarships to graduating seniors and post-secondary students each year. On the Steer- ing Committee Oscarson works towards promot- ing the All School Reun- ion and has been with the committee since 1992. Donna Smith is a Hen- ning High School gradu- ate from the class of 1954. She is the publicity chairperson of the Steer- ing Committee and helps get the word out about all of the activities. Smith joined the committee in 1996, the year of the fi rst H-545 Foundation reun- ion. Kay Thoreson joined the Steering Committee in 1996 and is in charge of registration. She grad- uated from Henning in 1955. Thoreson has said that she loves working on registration because she gets to see everybody. Both new and old faces are a joy to see! As this year’s All School Reunion comes closer and closer, the Steering Committee is busy getting everything in order. From baking cookies for registra- tion to checking off how many of the over 2,800 invitations sent out have been returned, it’s the attention to detail that makes each reunion spe- cial. Reunion committee continued f rom page 1 Keeping a tab on HHS alums By Jessica Borchardt citizens.advocate@mac.com When a letter arrives in the mail, it may be from a friend or family member, perhaps it’s a postcard arriving from a tropical island, or maybe it’s even a dreaded bill. People sending letters such as these probably know exactly what address the message needed to be sent to, or if they don’t, they know where to look it up. Here in Henning the all school reunion is quickly approaching . At the beginning of June, news- letters went out to alumni nation - wide reminding them of the event . Yet, when the packet arrived in a post offi ce box, on a doorstep, or in a mailbox, the individual prob- ably didn’t realize how much work went into fi nding the correct address. Rita Ellenson has been in charge of addresses since the fi rst Henning High School All Schoo l Reunion in 1996. When planning began for the fi rst reunion she had to start from scratch hunt- ing down addresses for all of the alumni, because not a single one was on any permanent record. Ellenson began by setting up what she calls an “address data- base.” At the time she was work- ing at Henning Public School and started the database on her school computer. Ellenson recalls that a t fi rst it was a mess. “We gathered information and Nearly 3,000 H545 packets mailed to high school alums each y ear See Almumni database Page 3 Two Henning alums share memories of school By Jessica Borchardt citizens.advocate@mac.com On May 29, this year’s graduati ng class of Hen- ning High School walked the stag e at commencement ceremonies to receive diplomas a midst the cheers of friends and family. Many then w ent home to large parties that had been planned for weeks if not months ahead of time. During the 1930s graduation was a slightly different affair. Two of Henning’s oldest a lumni shared some of their memories of graduation and high school. Edith (Trana) Iverson is a Henning High alum from the class of 1939 and Magdelene (Brutlag) Deschane graduated from Hen- ning in 1938. Deschane recalls See Changing times Page 3 One year later... work continues in Almora Photos by Chad Koenen By Chad Koenen citizens.advocate@mac.com One year after a devastat- ing tornado hit the Wadena and Otter Tail County area, members of the Wadena-Ot- ter Tail Long Term Recovery Committee helped organize a community clean up in Al- mora last week. With the help of churches and volunteers from across the state, Almora citizens reshingled houses, cleaned up debris, painted homes and provided assistance to one of the hardest hit areas by the June 17 tornado. On Friday, a memorial cer- emony was held to mark the one-year anniversary of the tornado and Margie Schulke who died as a result of inju- ries suffered from the torna- do.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 40 responders, said JesseSchmidt, public relationsofficer for the Fargo FireDepartment. Crews planned to remainon site for several morehours to monitor the fire,Scott said. “They’ll be checking allnight long to make surethey got it out,” he said.Fire investigators willreturn this morning to con-tinue their work in the day-light. The building housed 150tenants in its 62 units, andresidents were allowed tohave pets. Crews wereworking to rescue petsMonday night. Up to 150 area firefightersresponded to what officialsclassified as a “five-alarmfire,” Schmidt said.A five-alarm fire meansall 115 members of theFargo Fire Department arecalled out, as are membersof Moorhead and WestFargo fire departments andthe North Dakota AirNational Guard, Schmidtsaid. Salvation Army volun-teers provided food, waterand assistance to the fire-fighters, who rotated in andout throughout the night.Hundreds of spectatorsgathered at the sight of thebillowing black smoke andflames that were visible formiles. Authorities shut downtraffic on 42nd Streetbetween 32nd and 40thavenues for much of theevening. The Galleria On 42nd wasbuilt in 2000, property man-ager Doug Pfau said.“It’s really devastating,”Pfau said. “I’m happy thatnobody was injured.” The Red Cross set up ashelter for displaced resi-dents at Calvary UnitedMethodist Church in Fargo.As of 10:45 p.m., residentshad found other places tostay, and no one planned tostay overnight, said a RedCross representative.Officials hope to set up adonation fund today, butone local resident wasalready working late Mon-day to rally the Fargo-Moor-head community. Carol Cwiak, an assistantprofessor of emergencymanagement at NorthDakota State University,created the Facebook group“Galleria Fire – Help theResidents.” “Tonight, both my sonswere displaced by the Galle-ria apartment fire alongwith about 150 other resi-dents. Many of these folkslost everything,” Cwiakwrote on the group’s pageat about 10 p.m. “I just came off the‘Extreme Makeover’ buildwhere I saw the F-M com-munity pull off a miracle,”she wrote. “If you have any-thing left to give, this wouldbe the time to give it. Thesefolks need our help.” Inforum searchword: apartment fire Forum reporter Mary Beenkencontributed to this report. Readers can reach Forum reporters AmyDalrymple at (701) 241-5590 and Kristen Daum at (701) 241-5541 Snorkel crews from Fargo and Moorhead spray water Monday evening over the burned- out rafters of the south Fargo apartment building. Michael Vosburg Forum Photo Editor were all in much the samespot as the Swiers on Mon-day night – clutching whatthey were able to grab ontheir way out and wonder-ing what’s next. The complex had a pet-friendly policy that alloweddogs, so numerous tenantswere plopped down on theother side of 42nd Streetwith kennels at their side orleashes in hand. Jim Peterson was still atwork in the food court of theWest Acres Shopping Cen-ter when he got first word ofthe fire, which began justbefore 6 p.m. His mind racedto his dog and one insistentthought: “I gotta get home!” When he arrived at thescene, battling heavy traffic,fire crews wouldn’t let himinside. “I just pleaded with them.I wanted to run in myself,”Peterson said. “Nothing elsemattered but the dog.” A firefighter did find hispet, but Peterson was stillworried people may havebeen injured or other petsmight have been trapped. Fire officials said that noinjuries or fatalities werereported. A Red Cross shelter wasset up Monday night atFargo’s Calvary UnitedMethodist Church. Citybuses were used to trans-port some residents there.The shelter at the churchwas housing pets for thenight. By 9:30 p.m., firefight-ers had saved eight uniden-tified pets and expected tofind more. At the scene of the fire,Runa Olson was reunitedwith her Yorkie-poo aboutthree hours after the firebroke out. A tearful Olsonthanked the firefighters andtold them the dog was allshe cared about. “I pretty much thought hewas dead,” she said.Molly Criswell was prettysure her cat didn’t make it.Criswell, 75, was out on herbalcony when smoke beganbillowing from under theeaves of the building. “We thought, ‘That’s notright,’” she said. Criswell made it out fine,keeping well ahead of thedark smoke rolling down the hall, but she forgot thecat. “It was just a little guy,”she said of the kitten.Though the fire spreadquickly, multiple residentssaid they were able to walkout in a calm manner evenas smoke was beginning tofill the hallways. Jesse Ostlund was watch-ing a movie in his homewhen his smoke detectorwent off, though he suspect-ed it was a false alarm.Within minutes, he wentfrom watching a movie tofeeling like he was in one.He figured the fire wouldbe manageable when he first got outside, but not forlong. “After about five minutesyou couldn’t see the flamesanymore. Then after 10minutes, it was crazy,” hesaid. Calen Mahar had a simi-lar reaction when he madeit out: It looked like a firesmall enough to extinguisheasily. By shortly past 7p.m., he was seeing flames ring around the entire roofof the building. “I’ve neverseen anything like it. I’mspeechless,” he said.Adam Holisky wasimpressed by how orderlyresidents and onlookerswere in responding to thedirections of fire officialsand police. He was alsohappy he got his cat out. “Possessions are onething, but everybody’s safe, and that’s what’s importantin life,” he said. But it was hard not to atleast think about how thecontents of the apartmentwill be replaced, said SarahSwier. She and her husbandwere planning to buy ahouse soon and had manylegal documents collected.Plus, she couldn’t shake thethought of her scorchedwedding dress. Jason Swier, her hus-band, was home at the timeand for a moment consid-ered snatching some irre-placeable items. But hecouldn’t decide what wasmost important to grab,beyond essentials like thewallet, keys and phone. In the end, his wife said,the most important stuffwas saved. “My brain flashes backand forth,” she said. “ThenI just think, ‘My husbandand dog were all right.’” Inforum searchword: apartment fire Forum reporter Amy Dalrymple contributedto this report. Readers can reach Forum reporterDave Roepke at (701) 241-5535 A6 Tuesday, October 12, 2010 The Forum APARTMENT FIRE From Page A1 David Samson / The ForumRuna Olson is reunited with her dog, Odin, on Mondaynight at the Galleria On 42nd apartment complex. From Page A1 FIRE: Largest deputyhad seen in 20 years David Samson / The Forum Firefighters work the scene Monday night at the Galleria On 42nd apartment complex in south Fargo. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo EditorFlames engulf the Galleria On 42nd apartment complexMonday. Carrie Snyder / The ForumFirefighters respond to the five-alarm fire Monday insouth Fargo. Lost a pet? Apartment residentswho may have lost petsin the fire can callCalvary UnitedMethodist Church at(701) 232-5650 to see ifthey were rescued. Anyunclaimed pets will betaken to the F-MHumane Society, whichcan be reached at (701)239-0077. RESIDENTS: Many were able to save their animals and exit building calmly Red Cross offering helpfor Galleria residentsThe Red Cross will begin offeringservices today to Galleriaresidents. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,residents can get aid with basicnecessities and mental healthassistance at the Red Crossoffice at 2602 12th St. N., Fargo.Residents are asked to bringproof of residence, if possible. Weeklies over 5,000–6 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader, Terry Davis This mission is historic (Sharing a long hug at the conclu- sion) Perfect. I couldn’t take my eyes off her expression - is that a tear I see - until I noticed how tightly she’s hugging her dad. This photo tells a story, the caption adds to the significance of the moment. Second Place: Thisweek Apple Valley/Rosemount, Rick Orndorf Sobering reminder at Rosemount High School Very nice. I thought this was real until I read the caption. Composition and technique ensured a winning position among tough competition. All Dailies–42 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, David Samson Apartment building fire with half-moon This photo stood out the most from the selection of news photos. The moon elevates this entry to first place. Second Place: Daily Globe, Worthington, Brian Korthals Relay For Life raises $75,000 (walking couple) The composition of this photo works very well for the coverage of the event. Being able to read the message on the bag in the foreground combined with the people sillhouetted makes for a great shot from a annual event. News Photo CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 41  11Portage NewsJune 7, 2011 Floodwood D.A.R.E. graduation BY LOGAN EBERT Third place winner D.A.R.E. stands for Defi ne, Assess, Respond, Eval u- ate. Defi ne stands for “What is the problem.” Asse ss means “What are your choices.” Respond means “Use yo ur best choice.” Evaluate means “Did you make the right d ecision.” One idea is what if someone came up to you and said, “Do you want to smoke?” You could use D ARE by knowing that smoking is a problem. Smoking is illegal if you’re under the age of 18. Next, assess, what ar e your two choices: you could smoke with them or just say no and walk away. Then choose your best choice an d then evaluate by did anyone get hurt, or in trouble. D id you hurt your body? Another thing I learned in DARE is peer pressur e. Peer pressure is like if someone came up to you and said, “Do you want to drink?” And you said, “No” th en the person says, “are you a chicken or a man?” But there is also good peer pressure like if you are at a baseb all team and cheering for the team by saying you can hit the ball. That’s good peer pressure. Tobacco is a really bad thing. Tobacco has 200 poisons in it and tobacco affects your brain, you r mouth and throat, your lungs, and your heart and liver. Then marijuana is almost the worst thing out there. It is really illegal in America. It has 500 poisons. Drinking is another bad thing. It is illegal if you are under 21. Drinking slows down your reaction lik e if you put your hand on a hot stove you wouldn’t notic e it for 4 more seconds then you usually would and it affe cts your eyesight and balance. BY LOGAN SKAJ First place winner DARE is about avoiding drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes. You should avoid people that drink alcohol, use drugs, or smoke cigarettes. There is all sorts of peer pressure, good and bad, you have to know which is which and stand up to the bad and say no or avoid places that would put you into these situations. There is also strength in numbers, trying to stay around people that feel the same way as you about avoid- ing drugs, alcohol, and ciga- rettes makes it easier to say no. I learned that there are health issues with using drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes. These are lasting issues and get worse the more you use them. It is not only for you but for others around you too. Saying no can be diffi cult but the more you say it the easier it gets, also try and avoid situations where you think it will be more diffi cult to say no. I have learned how bad smoking, drinking, and doing drugs can be bad for people of all ages, especially my age. There are lots of kids out there that try these and get addicted to them; I do not want to be one of these kids so I have to be strong enough to “Just say no.” I know I may hurt peoples feelings by saying no, but it is my decision. I pledge that I, Logan Skaj, will avoid drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes. I will stand up to peer pressure and say no or avoid the situation. I will do my best to be around people that feel the same way as I do. BY ADRIANA PALMER Second place winner D.A.R.E. is a good way to help kids to stay of f of drugs and violence. Vern was a great teacher for it to ! The fi rst thing that I learned was the D.A.R.E decision making model, which is: D- Defi ne: Describe the prob- lem, challenge, or opportunity. A- Assess: Wh at are your choices? R- Respond: Make a choice. E- Eval uate: Review your decision. Then, we learned the harmful affects of tobacc o. Here are some of the facts: There are 200 known po isons in ciga- rette smoke. Smoking causes breathing problem s. Tobacco affects your body’s development. Smoking is th e leading preventable cause of death in this country. We learned that, Marijuana smoke contains 50% to 70% more of some cancer causing chemicals than tob acco smoke. Marijuana is illegal in the United States. Marijua na affects your brain, body, and the ability to concentrate. Another one of the very helpful things we learn ed was the bad facts about alcohol. Alcohol can damag e every organ in your body! Too much alcohol can lead to a c oma or even death! Alcohol is also illegal for anyone that is u nder 21. We also learned about how to say no. You can say no with humor, or you can say no by just walking away, but the main thing you have to remember is to kee p your head up and speak clear! I really liked learning all of these things that I kno w will help me out in life! Thank you Vern and thank yo u D.A.R.E! I have made a promise to myself that I will sta y drugs and violence free! On Thursday May 26, Floodwood’s 30 fi fth grade students celebrated their graduation from D.A.R.E . – Drug Abuse Resistance Education. At the conclusion of t he course, the students wrote essays summarizing what they had learned. First, second, and third place essay contes t winners were chosen by D.A.R.E. instructor Vern Vanguilder. D.A.R.E. Gradu ates: Back – Instr uctor Vern VanGu ilder, Alaura Ande rson, August Holt z, Nolan Heikkila , Dylan Runquist, Adriana Palmer, Nick Johnson, Ric ky Baker, Dillon R aisanen, Bryce Ta hja, Travis Aho, M ikayla Koivisto, M ariah Bailey, Loga n Skaj Leanne Ah o, Logan Ebert, Bryan Broten, Sila s Brown, Kyrah W illiams, Kalen Kue hl, Andrew Suonv ieri Front – Abiga il Lueck, Laura Ut echt, Nick Dilly, C ameron Gou- termont, J.D. Ped igo, Jenna Waters , Nicolette Callen , Keely Thompso n, Faith Romanek , Ashton Higbee. I do not want to be one of those kids I made a promise to myself to be drug free Peer pressure Portage News June 7, 201114 Sports Baseball SECTION 7A (Final Four) Double Elimination #2 ELY VS #1 DEER RIVER Tuesday, June 7 — 2 p.m. #3 CHISOLM VS #1 FLOODWOOD Tuesday, June 7 — 4:30 p.m. FINALS at Wade Stadium - 5:00 p.m. Thursday, June 9 Softball STATE SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 Mankato — 1:00 p.m. Track & Field STATE TRACK MEET at Hamline University, St. Paul Friday & Sat., June 10-11 — 3:00 p.m. Scores Baseball SECTION 7A (Round 1) Floodwood Polar Bears .................. 12 Northland Eagles............................. 1 Carlton Bulldogs ........................... 16 Albrook Falcons ............................ 11 Hill City Hornets ............................. 7 McGregor Mercuries ....................... 6 Silver Bay Mariners ....................... 10 Barnum Bombers ............................ 0 SECTION 7A (Round 2) Floodwood Polar Bears .................... 7 N-K Spartans .................................. 2 Ely Timberwolves ............................ 9 Carlton Bulldogs ............................. 0 Chisholm Bluestreaks ...................... 7 Silver Bay Mariners ......................... 6 Deer River Warriors ...................... 14 Hill City Hornets ............................. 2 SECTION 7A (Final Four) Deer River Warriors ........................ 8 Chisholm Bluestreaks ...................... 1 Ely Timberwolves ............................ 1 Floodwood Polar Bears .................... 0 Softball SECTION 7A (Final Four) Cherry/Cotton Tigers ...................... 2 Floodwood Polar Bears .................... 0 Carlton Bulldogs ............................. 7 Floodwood Polar Bears .................... 2 Carlton Bulldogs ............................. 4 Mesabi East Giants.......................... 0 SECTION 7A (Championship) Cherry/Cotton Tigers ...................... 2 Carlton Bulldogs ............................. 1 SECTION 5A (Championship) Barnum Bombers ............................ 1 Osakis Silverstreaks ......................... 6 Schedules Alex in; Emma just misses Collision at the fi nish line: Three runners, Emma Blom (South Ridge), Megan West (Mesabi East) and Kailee Kiminski (Esko) collided at the fi nish line in a fi ght for the top to spots at the Section 7A meet held at UMD. It was determined following the con- troversial fi nish that Kailee fi nished fi rst, and Megan edged out Emma for the fi nal spot at the state meet. Photos by JOHN GRONES Portage News Alex Taray (Floodwood) and Allie Cahoon (Cromwell) are headed to the Minnesota State Track & Field Championships at Ham- line University in St. Paul; Emma Blom (South Ridge) just missed advancing in the 1600 State bound: Floodwood senior Alex Tara y fl ung the discus 147 feet, 1 inch and placed second at the Section 7A track and fi eld meet at UMD. Alex will advance t o the Minnesota Track & Field Championships at Hamline Uni versity in St. Paul. see ALEX IN page 16 BY JOHN GRONES Sports Editor The Section 7A Track and Field meet was fi lled with excitement again this year. There was no m ore drama than in the girls 1600 meter run this year. Three runners col- lided at the fi nish and only two advanced. For one Floodwood and one Cromwell athle te, the next step will be a trip to the Minnesota Tra ck & Field Championships. South Ridge runner, Emma Blom is the odd girl out this year in what might be the closest 1600 meter run race ever at a section meet. Emma, along with M egan West (Mesabi East) and Kailee Kiminski (Esko) a ll arrived at the fi nish line at the same time. A collision occurred, and all three runners c ollapsed in a heap. When the dust settled, it was dete rmined that Kailee crossed fi rst, Megan edged Emma fo r second, and a trip to state was dashed for South Ridge. Floodwood senior Alex Taray will be makin g his fi rst trip the Minnesota State Track & Field Cha mpionships. Alex placed second in the discus with an ex cellent toss of 147—01. By Matt BunkeSports Editor The Mayer Lutheran girls’track team took sixth place outof seven teams last week atthe Ed Bourelle Invite, whichwas hosted by St. Michael-Albertville, while the boys’team took seventh.Competing at a meet withmostly larger schools for thesecond time in as manyweeks, the girls’ team scored74 points, while Monticellowon with 170 points.Monticello also won the boys’meet with 160 points, whileMayer Lutheran scored 44. The lone individual win onthe day belonged to BrittanyErdmann, who won the shotput (38-3) and also finishedsecond in the discus (108-11).Also on the girls’ side, sev-eral athletes placed in multipleevents, including JessicaKlaustermeier, who was thirdin both the 100 meters (13.44)and 200 meters (27.45), andalso took sixth in the long jump(14-9). Annalisa Scheele tookthird in the 400 meters(1:03.93) and sixth in the polevault (8-0), Josie Schreinerwas fifth in the 100 meters(13.72) and seventh in the 200meters (28.78), and HaileySiegle was fifth in the triplejump (30-5) and seventh in thelong jump (14-8).Also for the Mayer Lutheran girls, Ashlyn Hucky was third inthe triple jump (31-6), JenKrentz was seventh in the polevault (8-0) and AllisonErdmann was eighth in the100 hurdles (18.67). TheMayer Lutheran girls’ also tooksecond in the 4x200 relay.On the boys’ side, AlexKlaustermeier had a second-place finish in the 400 meters(53.64) and a third-place finishin the 200 meters (24.11). Healso finished seventh in thehigh jump (5-4) and was partof the Crusaders 4x400 relayteam, which took third.Jake Coyle had a fourth-place finish in the 100 meters(12.02) and Matt Chapa was See LHS / Page 11 SPORTS Raiders cruise to four wins LHS takes on larger schools By Paul DownerCommunity Editor During the early portion ofthe season the Central base-ball team struggled to find con-sistent pitching, but didenough hitting to stay compet-itive. Last week, the oppositeoccurred when the Raidershad four strong performanceson the mound but collectedjust 14 hits over four games ina 2-2 week. “Fourteen hits over fourgames and we went 2-2? It’shard to complain about that,”said Raiders head coach JonWroge. “We had a great weekon the mound. Now we justhave to get the bats goingagain and we’ll be OK.”Central started the weekwith a 3-2 loss at LeSueur-Henderson on May 2, thenswept a double-header athome against Jordan on May 5by scores of 3-2 and 5-1before finishing the week witha 4-1 home loss to St. Peter onMay 6. With those results, the Raiders are now 6-6 on theseason, 5-4 in the MinnesotaRiver Conference. Central 2, LSH 3The first game of the weekfeatured a pitcher’s dualbetween Central’s Kyle Braziland his opposite number fromMRC-leading LeSueur-Henderson. The Raiders hadjust three hits and the Giantshad four, but the Giants tookadvantage of a Central error to score two runs in the fifthinning and take the game 3-2. “This was a really good highschool baseball game eventhough we were on the losingend of it,” said Wroge. “Weplayed well, they just played alittle better. We gave them fiveouts in the fifth inning, andwhen you give good teamsextra outs you’re going to be introuble.” Brazil went four innings forthe Raiders, allowing one earned run on two hits andstriking out five. Tanner Kohlsalso pitched 1.2 innings inrelief and allowed just one hit.At the plate, Kohls, BarretPanning and Tim Willems hadCentral’s hits, with Willems hit-ting a double and Panningpicking up an RBI. Central 3, Jordan 2Willems threw a gem in thefirst game of a double-headeragainst Jordan, going allseven innings on the moundwhile allowing just two hits andone earned run and strikingout five. The Raiders trailed 2-0going into the bottom of thesixth inning, but pushedacross one run in that frame toclose the deficit to one run. Inthe bottom of the seventh, ErikBuckentine led off with apinch-hit single, and Jordan’sdefense fell apart when theCentral’s Jesse Faschingattempted a sacrifice bunt.A wild throw allowedFasching to reach base safelywhile Buckentine went to third,and two errors later theRaiders had scored a pair ofruns for a walk-off win. “That was our first win over See Baseball / Page 11 Pitching carries Central in 2-2 week By Paul DownerCommunity Editor The Raiders rolled to fourvictories last week on the armof freshman pitcher NatalieStockman. Stockman threw everyinning and notched threeshutouts, and the only runscored against Central duringthe week was unearned.Central won 6-0 at Jordanon May 2, 1-0 at LeSueur-Henderson on May 3, 12-1over Jordan on May 5 and 1-0over Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted on May 6.With those wins, theRaiders are now 8-2 on theseason, 6-2 in the MinnesotaRiver Conference. Central 6, Jordan 0Stockman hurled a com- plete game no-hitter in theweek’s opening game, goingseven innings and striking outthree while walking two. “She does a good job ofthrowing multiple pitches forstrikes and she gets ahead ofhitters, forcing them to go onthe defense,” said Raidershead coach Jon Lambrecht.“Thus hitters rarely get thegood part of the bat on the ballas they are typically protectingthe strike zone. She really hasgotten control of her changeupand drop ball to complementher fastball. She is not over-poweringly fast but she is veryintelligent and knows whenand where to place her pitch-es. “She is aided by the consis-tent receiving skills of AngieEsselman behind the plate.Angie’s ability to block thelower pitches allows Nataliemore room to work and tothrow her drop ball andchangeup in a variety ofcounts.” Meanwhile, the Raidersoffense was active in the earlygoing, scoring one run in thefirst inning and five in the sec-ond to give Stockman a cush-ion. Stockman herself was themost productive Central hitter,going 3-4 with a grand slamhome run to knock in four runs.Other contributors includedBrooke Willemsen, who went3-4 with a stolen base, andHaley Shanahan and KaylaLeonhardt who each had twohits. Central 1, LSH 0Stockman followed up herno-hitter against Jordan withanother shutout, this time atwo-hitter, the following dayagainst LeSueur-Henderson.She struck out five batters andwalked one, and the Jaguarsnever advanced a runner pastsecond base. “Our defense once againstepped up and made playswhen they had to. [Stockman] really does a good job of keep-ing hitters off balance anduncomfortable, and she han-dled the dangerous LSH line-up for the second time,” saidLambrecht. The Raiders were stymiedat the plate as well, but man-aged to squeeze in one runafter Afton Wolter walked andMegan Schmitz singled herhome in the second inning.Schmitz was the only playerwith a multi-hit day at the platefor Central, but Willemsen andSund each notched singlesand Stockman hit a double. Central 12, Jordan 1The shutout streak came toa close for Stockman after afirst-inning error allowed theJaguars to take an early 1-0lead, but it was all Central fromthat point on. Every starter in Central line-up notched at least one hit, See Softball / Page 11 Taz Seibert tries to avoid a tag at home after he was caught in a rundown against Jordan on May 5. Seibert was eventually tagged out, but not before delaying long enough for the runner behind him to advance. Below, Kyle Brazil tracks a fly ball down the left field line in the same game. Photos by Paul Downer “In the Community,With the Community,For the Community” Visit us on the web at www.mnsun.com THE NORWOOD YOUNG AMERICA TIMES 10 MAY 12, 2011 Natalie Stockman throws three shutouts By Paul DownerCommunity Editor The Central boys golf teamcontinues to battle near thetop of the conference.Last week the boys tied forthird in a Minnesota RiverConference meet atDahlgreen Golf Course onMay 3. Holy Family (154) wonthe meet, followed by MayerLutheran (177), Central (179),Jordan (179), LeSueur-Henderson (196), Sibley East(196), Belle Plaine (201) andMontgomery-Lonsdale (Inc.). “Overall, we were inconsis-tent off the tee,” said Raiders head coach Rick Willhite.“We got ourselves in a lot oftrouble spraying those teeshots around. That madework out of it with our secondshots, so that was our biggestproblem of the day.”Allen VanDien led theRaiders with a season-bestscore of 41. Connor Sullivan(43), Neil Oftelie (48) and TomMessner (49) / Tony Hegseth(49) scored for the Raiders,and Brady Sullivan (51) alsocompeted at varsity for theRaiders. “Allen was our medalist, soit was good to see him leadthe way and break his streakof 43s,” said Willhite. “Connorhad another good round and See Golf / Page 11 Raider boys finishthird at Dahlgreen By Paul DownerCommunity Editor It was a good week for theCentral girls’ track team,which finished third at a pairof conference meets inJordan and Sibley East.At Jordan, the Raidersposted 86 points to finishbehind Belle Plaine/HolyFamily (199) and Jordan(162) in a six-team meet.Bailey Cook had Central’sonly top individual finish in the 100-meter hurdles (17.3).Cook also took secondplace in the high jump (5feet) and Marissa Sullivan(4-8) was fourth in the sameevent. Parry Larson took secondin the triple jump (32 feet) andadded a third place finish inthe 800-meter run (2:41) anda fourth place performance inthe 1,600-meter run (5:56).Sami Jo Brinkmann had agood day in the field events,taking second in the discus(91-03) and third in the shotput (28-10). Lexi Erpenbach took third See Track / Page 11 CHS girls takethird at Jordan, SE Marissa Sullivan runs for Central atJordan on May 3. Submitted photo Central shortstopAfton Wolter firesto first after field-ing a grounder against Jordan onMay 5. Photo by Paul Downer • 5/12 DH vs. MayerLutheran CHS Baseball • 5/12 Central Invite@Glencoe CC CHS Golf • 5/13 @LeCenter CHS Track and Field • 5/12 DH vs. MayerLutheran CHS Softball • 5/16 @Belle Plaine LHS Track and Field Central High School Sports Schedule Day/Date Thur., May 12 Fri., May 13 Sat., May 14 Mon., May 16 Tues., May 17 Baseball Boys Golf Girls Golf Softball TrackMayerLutheran 4 & 6 pm at Glencoe CC 12:30 pm at LeCenter 4 pm at Belle Plaine 4 pm Mayer Lutheran 4 & 6 pm Conference Tourney at Montgomery GC 9 am at Montgomery Lonsdale 5 pm at Montgomery Londsdale 5 pm at St. Peter Shoreland 4:30 pm Conference Tourney at Montgomery GC 9 am Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.510 Faxon Road Norwood Young America 952-467-3061Donna.J.Stacken@ampf.com Member FINRA and SIPC Good Luck Raiders! at St. Peter Shoreland 4:30 pm Weeklies up to 1,500–24 entries First Place: Portage News, Floodwood, John Grones Alex in; Emma just misses Half the battle of getting winning photos is to have something to shoot, and you definitely had a moment in time to capture here and it’s captured! Wonderful job! Second Place: Portage News, Floodwood, John Grones Cards win on final hand Very nice photo!! It’s got movement and emotion. Great job!! Honorable Mention: Le Center Leader, Pat Beck Braves collide with tough foe Very nice photo . . . a second later and a tighter crop and this would have been first place. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–17 entries First Place: Norwood Young America Times, Paul Downer Pitching carries Central in 2-2 week Sharp photo of a play at the plate, what we like to see when we go to baseball games. The runner’s expression is clear in technical image and game emotion. Second Place: Delano Herald Journal, Matt Kane Jay bird We see these plays on TV, but rarely captured for the local paper. His team lost, but the photo is a winner. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–29 entries First Place: Morris Sun Tribune, Nancy Woodke The race is on . . . Great action yet crisp as a Kit-Kat. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Brian Wierima Foster dives into finals: Kyley Foster performs one of her dives during the Class 1A state meet. A few other photos were on par with this one, but the clean background and grace of this photo prevailed. Aesthetically pleasing shot without much distraction from the subject Sports Photo CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 42 Weeklies over 5,000–12 entries First Place: Wright County Journal-Press, Buffalo, Heather Reinhart Buffalo Rodeo - Muttin Bustin Riveting action in the foreground with a great range of emotion and color in the background as well. Second Place: Lakeshore Weekly News, Wayzata, Mark Trockman SAFE! Nice shot that just edged out some close competition by being in color. All Dailies–47 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times, Dave Schwarz Ouch Crisp and unusual. Spikes vs. faces don’t happen often in baseball, even less on the basepath itself. Second Place: Mesabi Daily News, Virginia, Mark Sauer T-S slips by Cotton, 3-2 We get a lot of pictures of athletes celebrating, but rarely a coach. Even rarer with this much emotion. Great job of showing the true feelings of the match, which was the final home game in this small school’s history. Honorable Mention: Duluth News Tribune, Bob King Marathon runner Like the abstractness of this, with part of the leg missing, and half a hand in the reflection. Neat angle to choose, and keep things in focus as well. Sports Photo CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 43  Page 4B WEDNESDAY, AUG. 3, 2011 Out & About by Adam Hjelm FLEET SUPPLY YOUR COMPLETE FARM & HOME STORE FEEDS Y SAUK CENTRE �����#ENTRE�3TREET�s�0H����� ��� ���� STORE HOURS Monday - Thursday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. • Friday 8 a. m. - 8 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. • Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p .m. GLENWOOD (WY����������s�0H����� ��� ���� STORE HOURS Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. • Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p .m. PAYNESVILLE (WY�����7EST�s�0H����� ��� ���� STORE HOURS Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. LITTLE FALLS (WY�����s�0H����� ��� ���� STORE HOURS Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. • Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p .m. Fishing Licenses & Live Bait Available Sauk Centre Store Only No Cash... No Problem - Charge It! Propane for Grills . . . Fill Your Cylinders! Available at all Fleet Supply Stores We have a large selection of clothing, camping, fishing and hunting supplies for all outdoor enthusiasts! STOP IN TODAY! OUTDOORS Call 320-352-6577 Ask for Joyce /RFDWHG�LQ�WKH�6DXN�&HQWUH�+HUDOG�2IÀFH 522 Sinclair Lewis Avenue Sauk Centre, MN 56378 Sauk Centre, MN (320) 352-6577 WE DESIGN AND DO SIGNS OF ALL KINDS! SIGNDesign "/!4�,%44%2).'�s�!,,�9/52�&!2-�3)'.�. %%$3� !54/-/4)6%�s�3./7-/"),%�,%44%2).'� ��$%3)'.3� AND MORE! by CAROL MOORMAN carol@melrosebeacon.com Fin-tastic time on Lil’ Birch Lake Students listen as Pete Linsner explains about the Big Mouth Bass, after which he cleaned the  sh he caught the day be fore on Little Birch Lake. BEACON PHOTOS BY CAROL MOO RMAN Little Birch Lake–Antony Morales was anxious to hit the water. “Can I go  shing,” he asked just before 9 a.m. on Thursday, July 28. “I’m go- ing to catch more  sh than you,” volunteer Cheryl Harren told him as they boarded a pontoon captained by Ralph Wessel and daughter Linda Bea- ver, on Little Birch Lake, north of Mel- rose. It was the third annual catch and release  sh outing for students in the Targeted Ser- vices Day Camp Program, offered this summer at Melrose Public School, thanks to a state grant. Bruce Thompson enjoys eating a s’more. The  sh- ing day camp included lunch over a grill, along with games and  shing. Haiden Rausch holds up the  sh she just caught. Day camp students surround Shelly Clif ford, Pete Linsner and Jenn Rush, as Ru sh presents Linsner with a donation to the Little Birch Lake Association for the ir assistance during the  shing outing. Target Services volunteer Cheryl Harr en helps Antony Morales (left) pull a  sh out of the w ater, while Ralph Wessel (left) and Fernando Sanchez (rig ht) watch. Behind them is Linda Beaver, Ralph’s daughte r, who helped on the pontoon. “We maxed out with 70 students this year,” said Jenn Rush, program coordinator. Youth  shed in two shifts, some never experi-encing this before, others bringing their own  shing rods. Cap- taining the six pontoons were Little Birch Lake Association members Mike Kramer and Don Salzmann, Ralph Wessel and Linda and Jim Beaver, Diane and Dan Langley, Sam Schnell, Mike and Gail Schlicht and George and Phyllis Brooks, while Pete Linsner, event orga- nizer, drove around in his boat making sure everyone had enough bait and equipment. While one group  shed, another played games and ate hotdogs and s’mores. They were all eyes and ears when Linsner showed them how to  llet  sh. Two lucky youth were able to take home cleaned  sh. Youth received a prize for the  rst one to catch a  sh on each pontoon. Most left later that morn- ing having caught a few  sh and, for sure, having fun. “This is all about pro- moting  shing with kids,” Linsner concluded. ‘That’s a big fi sh.’ --A day camp youth Diversity The of DIVERSITY Are you the problem? Throughout the past years in this great area, I have had the opportunity of working with some of the most amazing volun- teer organizations. Many of these organizations are geared around our natural resources and the preserva- tion and promotion of these great assets just out our back doors. They are the lake associations, the conserva- tion clubs, the river groups, and many more that are all working toward improv- ing natural resources and the community as a whole. They are the folks taking kids out  shing and hunt- ing to increase awareness and share their knowledge and passion with the next generations. Not too long ago I was sipping on a cup of Phyllis’ sludge and listening to a coffee drinker complaining about how bad the water was on “his” lake. He went on to vent about his neigh- bors, the city and the farm- ers all contributing to the poor water quality. After he was done with his tangent, I asked him if he was part of the problem or part of the solution. A priceless line that my grandpa would always hit me with when I was going on a tangent about this or that. I asked him if he was doing any- thing about improving the water quality in “his” lake. He answered with a frus- trated why should I nobody else is doing anything. He was wrong that day and is still wrong to this day. I could go on about the agencies, laws, and ordinances all put into place to protect our natural resources. However, at the heart of conservation are the volunteers. If it were not for the volunteers in our communities, I dread to think how bad things really might be on our area lakes and streams. I dread to think how many youth would have never picked up that  shing pole or chased their  rst whitetail. I know that if it wasn’t for my grandpa and others that drug a sleepy-eyed teenager out in the duck boat or the  sh house, I might not be where I am today. Put your time and talents to work in order to help the area community, lakes and streams. You can help at the next take a kid or take a senior  shing event,  ip pancakes at the next fundraiser, collect water samples for testing, attend a Conservation Club meeting, join Ducks Unlimited. The list goes on and on of all the ways you can help your community and the natural resources we all enjoy and support many of our liveli- hoods. Why should I? The better question is why shouldn’t you? Wednesday, Aug . 24, 2011 Volume 131 Issue 34 Spring Valley, M innesota www.svtribune. com 75¢ Dakota war histo ry – Page 2 By Gretchen Mensink Lovejoy Spring Valley T ribune The Kingsland Athletic Booster Club (K ABC) was pleased to repo rt that since March, it has g iven a total of $18,930 to the Kingsland School Board o f Directors for use to maintain or improve Kingsland’s ath letic programs. KABC member Stacey Rath stated to the bo ard during its August meeting , held Aug. 15, that $12,500 of that sum was a “flat donation f or the Kingslan d coaches’ wish l ists.” The remaining $6,4 30 was given to various athletic teams that assisted with b ingo games. The board appr oved bringing Interquest Can ine into the schools as part of a safety and security progra m. The program includes bringi ng well-trained search dogs int o the school for half a day at a c ost of $300 to sniff out hazard s in the build- ing. McDonald rela ted, “The dogs don’t actually s niff students — it’s done very p rofessionally — but they are all owed to sniff lockers and any vehicles on school property . The program works with the sheriff’s depar t- ment, and they do not announce when they’re com- ing. This is to c reate a level of safety and secu rity. There’s going to be a pr ogram for stu- dents and one f or parents so they can see wh at we have coming to our s chools.” The purchase o f 60 Netbooks for the College in the Schools program was m et with approval, as th e units will allo w students enroll ed in College in the Schools to “ interface with a number of tech nologies and bring the lesson s to life.” The teachers should soon be able to record what the y’re teaching, share SmartBo ard markings and notes, even tually post lessons to YouT ube for stu- dents to upload if they missed a concept or a cla ss, and student s may view lesso ns for review anywhere there ’s wireless Internet service . The board is also considerin g purchasing Netbooks for th ird and fourth grade reading e nrichment pro- gramming. Kingsland Prin cipal James Hecimovich up dated the board on the annual k indergarten roundup, which was held Tuesday, Aug. 9 . “Our ‘Knights of the Roundup ’ had 56 stu- dents attending of 60, and there’s a possib ility of 60 or 61 students. The k ids were assessed, given orientation, and thanks to T erry Allen, they enjoyed their fi rst school lunch.” Kingsland’s kin dergarteners will attend scho ol five days a week, all day, a s opposed to previous progr amming that included a fifth day of instruc- tion only for th ose who needed remedial assist ance. At the middle school, classrooms are being prepared for Project Lea d the Way (PLTW ) units to be taught, with fur nishings and equipment arri ving daily for the science and math explo- ration program . The district’s n ew assistant By David Phi llips Spring Valley T ribune A Spring Valley woman didn’t get to see President Barack Obama in person, as she had hoped, but had a “fun experience ” Sunday attempting to g et tickets and Monday watch ing his motor- cade on Highw ay 52 in Fountain. Arlette May Kv am drove to Cannon Fall s Sunday with her husband, R ick, to try to get a ticket to O bama’s scheduled town hall gather- ing there on Mo nday. Obama kicked off his th ree-day Midwest bus to ur in Cannon Falls with an ou tdoor gather- ing that include d a crowd of around 500 pe ople. Kvam arrived i n Cannon Falls a little aft er 11 a.m. the day before the gathering when tickets w ere being dis- tributed and re ceived ticket number 702. A total of num- ber 1,000 ticke t numbers were handed ou t, but only 500 actual tick ets to the event were allo wed. The tick- ets were award ed on a first come, first serv ed basis with the numbered t ickets given out starting som etime before 6 a.m. Some pe ople had arrived at midn ight to camp out in line. Kvam said she knew her chances were “ pretty much nil” when she r eceived num- ber 702, but de cided to stick around anyway since it was a beautiful day a nd there were rumors that mo re than 500 may be allocate d for the event. “I’ve never had the experi- ence of standin g in line for three hours bef ore — unless it was for a Star Wars movie,” she said. It was very positive, though, a socia l event. “It was like going t o a party.” People of all ag es, elderly to infants, and political views were present fr om not just Minnesota, but also the Dakotas and W isconsin. Besides conver sation with others in line, s he brought a book to keep bu sy while her husband cruise d the streets of Cannon Fall s in his con- vertible and too k breaks to read his own bo ok. The gates to cit y hall opened at 1 p.m . and people were ushered in to get their tickets based on the priority of their numbe red tickets received earlier . Shortly after 2 p.m., the ann ouncement came that all ti ckets to the event had been delegated. Had Kvam mad e the cut, she would have asked for two tickets, the max imum allowed per per son. The other one woul dn’t have been for her husband , who had to work Monday, but for Francis Galles, a retired monsignor livin g in Preston. Although Galle s had no idea she was even th inking of this, she said she tho ught he would be the pe rson who would most val ue such a tick- et and wanted t o include him on this special event. By Sonya Me yerhofer Spring Valley T ribune A trio of new vi sitors made a stop in Spring V alley Wednesday, Au g. 17. This alon e isn’t a unique o ccurrence but these visitors c ame in on foot with packs stra pped to their backs. The three hiker s are partici- pating in the “G reat American Walkabout” an d Spring Valley was just one of their stops as they walk acros s America. The group includes Eddie Bond, 2 8, of Oahu, Hawa ii, Michael Nelsen, 25, of N apa Valley, Calif., and Bull a Lepen, 29, als o of Oahu. Bond said with the trio work- ing as street pe rformers show- casing perform ance art, the economy was h ard on them. Bond used to ru n a straight- jacket-making business in Oahu, which ca me about from his work as a st raitjacket escape artist, b ut sold the busi - ness to join the hike. Bond me t Nelsen when h e came to work for him in Oahu and a month later, Nelsen to ld him he want - ed to walk acro ss the country and Bond decid ed it seemed like a good idea . Lepen joined the two in Haw aii. They started ou t on their journey from S an Francisco March 7 and pl an to reach New York City by th e end of Octobe r this fall. They h ave traveled about 2,200 m iles, all on foot, with the estima ted total mileage to New York City bringing their t rek to about 3,500 miles. Th ey decided to take a northern route across America, using online maps such as Google Maps and map s they pick up alo ng the way. The route they traveled took them through S an Jose, Calif., Lake Tahoe, Tw in Falls, Ida., Yellowstone in Wyoming and Rapid City, S.D . Some of their favorite stops a long the way so far have been V irginia City, Nev., and seein g the Grand Teton Mountai ns in Wyoming . Three hikers stop in S pring Valley on trek across America Group walking to inspire othe rs to follow pas sions in life Three hikers, two fr om Hawaii and one from California, hav e been walking acro ss America since Mar ch in the “Great Ame rican Walkabout.” They s topped in Spring Va lley overnight Wedn esday evening, Aug . 17. They had a me al at A&W and staye d at Spring Valley Inn & Suites. From left are Michael Nelsen of N apa Valley, Calif., an d Bulla Lepen and E ddie Bond, both of O ahu, Hawaii. (Tribune photos by S onya Meyerhofer) Spring Valley woman m isses on town hall gathering, bu t gets to view president’s bus in F ountain School – Continued on page 5 Hikers – Continued on page 3 President – Continu ed on page 5 Kingsland School District receives booster club donations Ag Days action Ag Days featured ma ny new events this year that provided competition and fun for the par- ticipant as well as sp ectators. In kickball, Mitch Wolfg ram nabs a hard line drive while Frankie Lazarra gets in on th e action. Seth Howard tries his han d at bull rid- ing in the stick pony rodeo. In bot- tom photo, Tanner S uess, left, wins his pie eating c ontest heat. More photos inside. (Tribune photos by D avid Phillips) Weeklies up to 1,500–14 entries First Place: Spring Valley Tribune, David Phillips Ag Days action Great shot! Love the facial expressions. Second Place: Portage News, Floodwood, John Grones Eat like a bird Beautiful! Honorable Mention: Lakefield Standard, Mike Jordan Sweet corn in the cafeteria Love the girl’s face… Weeklies 1,501-2,500–28 entries First Place: Melrose Beacon, Carol Moorman That’s a big fish In this photo the Big Mouth Bass evokes disgust, wonderment and awe at the exact same time. The photographer captures that moment. Second Place: The Thirteen Towns, Fosston, J. Reed Anderson A Grateful Nation… This photograph combines the raw emotion of a grieving widow with the innocence of a child unaware of what’s been taken from her. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–36 entries First Place: Anoka County Union, Eric Hagen Night to Unite puts playful face on law enforcement Very Nice Color! Love the eyes on both the officer and the little boy. Second Place: Cottonwood County Citizen, Windom, Dave Fjeld Making spirits bright Great Background. Great expressions on the subjects. Weeklies over 5,000–22 entries First Place: Thisweek Burnsville/Eagan, Rick Orndorf Beating the Heat Fun in the moment photo. Crisp image the conveys the spirit of summer. Great job! Second Place: Edina Sun Current, Katie Mintz Edina veteran gets long-awaited visit An emotional photo that speaks a lot about the moment. Good job. Feature Photo CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 44 Contents Classifieds B, E Lotteries A2 Obituaries D4-5 Opinion A9-11 Outdoors C6-8 Scrapbook F Sports C1-5 TV listings F8 Get home delivery (218) 723-5252 or (800) 456-8080 Today: Sunny and clear throughout High: 71 Low: 49 Weather News tips (218) 723-5300 Laurie Hertzel stands near her old desk in the News Trib- une newsroom, where she wo rked from the mid-1970s to the mid-’90s. Bob King / rking@ duluthnews.com CHRISTA LAWLER clawler@duluthnews.com It had been 16 yea rs since Laurie Hertzel last walked through the dou- ble glass doors of 424W. 1st St. “Where’s the linotype machine?” the former staff reporter asked, looking around the News Tribune lobby during a recent trip back to the place where she got her first whiffs of news ink. “It was right here.” Already a relic during Hertzel’s tenure, the clunky piece of print equipment that once revo- lutionized the world of journalism had been on display in the lobby. It’s gone now— one of many things that have changed in the newspaper’s offices — not to mention the en- tire industry— since her time here from themid- 1970s throughmid-1990s. Hertzel, who is now the books editor at theMin- neapolis Star Tribune, wrote about that time in her memoir “News toMe: Ad- ventures of an Accidental Journalist,” released in late August. It is the 224-page story, published by the University of Min- nesota Press, about her as - cension through the ranks of the cigarette smoke- hazed newsroom, the trip Reporter tracks her paper trail “News to Me” recountsLaurie Hertzel’s evolutionfrom a “terrribly shy” re-porter to world-travelingjournalist. A car drives over a rumble str ipe along County Road 4 on Th ursday south of Biwabik. New highway safety guidelines re- quired the strips to be moved 12 inches toward the center o f the road and onto the fog lin e, turning the old rumble “stri p” into a rumble “stripe.” Bob Kin g / rking@duluthnews.com DuluthNewsTribuneDuluthNewsTribune Sunday, September 12, 2010 More than 140,000 readers e very Sunday $ 1.50 Wet, wild marathon, C1 Rumble stripe grumbles JOHN MYERS jmyers@duluthnews.com B arbara Hinsz grew accus- tomed to the quiet at her home just off St. Louis Cou nty Road 4 south of Biwabik. Evenings would get so pea ce- ful that she could sit on a l awn chair and hear her llamas chew their hay. But Hinsz says a well-inte ntioned effort to make rural highw ays safer has ruined her rural seren ity. Thanks to a federally fund ed highway safety effort, cou nty crews gouged new “rumble strip es” along the highway this summer , but not in their usual place midway in the shoulder. New highway sa fety guide- lines call for the rumble st rips to go on the so-called fog line, th e continu- ous white stripe that sepa rates the driving lane from the shou lder. The problem seems to be t he 12-inchmove from rumble strips on the shoulder to rumble str ipes on the fog line. Instead of serving as an in- frequent jolt to remind dri fting driv- ers to return to the drivin g lane, critics say a reverberating rumble is happening whenever a car or truck strays just a bit to the righ t. It’s espe- cially bad on curves, inclu ding where Hinsz lives. Over Labor Day weekend, “I sat down to watch a little TV b ut had to turn it up so I could hear i t. With the windows closed,” Hinsz sa id. “The Fourth of July was a treat , too. Just one after another.’’ Logging trucks, cars pulin g boats and campers, impaired dr ivers, inat- tentive drivers, tourists ga wking at the scenery—Hinsz says it seems just about everyone is drif ting out of the driving lane just enou gh to drive over the rumble stripe. Ev en far down the road, the rumble reverber- ates into her yard and eve n into her house. Neighbors to the new rum ble stripes, including some wh o live a quarter-mile or more off th e road, say it’s keeping them awa ke at night. Lake homeowners say it’s hurting their property values in ad dition to their rural lifestyle. “If you are outside, you ca n’t have a conversation,” Hinsz sai d. “Some- times we get two cars, goin g both ways, who hit them at the same time. That’s really special.” Some see rumble stripes as a n annoying but necessary saf ety measure, but others say the n oise has become an intrusion . “If you are outside (near rumble stripes), you can’t have a conversation.” Barb Hinsz, who lives sou th of Biwabik, near a part of C ounty Road 4 where rumble stripes hav e been placed See Rumble, Page A7 See Hertzel, Page A5 Clint Austin / caustin@duluthne ws.com ANewYork firefighter pa ys respects to victims of the S ept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks d uring a ceremony near theWorl d Trade Center site on Satur day. Ceremonies were held in s everal U.S. cities to remember th ose who died in New York, Wa shing- ton and Pennsylvania. Pa ge A3 9 years later, we remember 49 Low: 71 High: $67 IN COUPONS INSIDE Portage News September 21, 2010 24 Flip Side PIE EATING CONTEST It was a great turnout at the Northview Bank Pie Eating contest at this year’s Floodwood Fall Color Festival. Mariah Bailey is astonished when she discovers that Leann Aho (8-11 category) was fi nished with her pie. Below: Tamera Lundstrom ate all her pie with the exception of what was left on her face. Tamara won the four to seven year old category. PIE EATING CONTEST It was a great turnout at the Northview Bank Pie Eating contest at this year’s Floodwood Fall Color Festival. Mariah Bailey is astonished when she discovers that Leann Aho (8-11 category) was fi nished with her pie. September 21, 2010 Flip Side Fall Color Festival ADULT FUN Darren Mattila wondered what happens when a hair falls in the pie. It wasn’t a factor, and David Haataja fi nished his pie fi rst to claim fi rst prize. category. Best slice of pie ADULT FUN Darren Mattila wondered what happens when a hair falls in the pie. PLAYIN’ IN THE PIE Jon Webster had a blast participat- ing in the pie eating contest. Below: Honna Hendrickson was a winner of the 12 to 15 year old category. Pie baking contest—The winners of this year’s pie baking contest were: 1st prize–Fred Young, for apple raisin; 2nd prize–Susan Jussila, for apple crumb; and 3rd prize, Donna Far- rell, for apple cranberry. The contest was sponsored by T.O.P.S. MN #1068 Floodwood. Judges for the contest were Jerel “Bubba” Vance, Olga Kemp, and Roger Kivela. See page 7 for more on: Color Festival: A time for pies. September 21, 2010 Vol. 1, No. 43 $1.00 Four Rivers Foundation changes focus INDEX Opinion, 4–5 Faith, 6–7 Community Cal. 8–9 Outdoors, 12–13 Sports, 14–17 Classifi eds, 18–21 Taste, 22–23 PIE EATING CONTEST: The Northview Bank Pie Eating contest was a hit at this year’s Floodwood Fall Color Festival. See who won the Pie Baking contest. — See the Flip Side FLOODWOOD, Minn.—After a discus-sion, which included a return to their original mission statement, the Four Rivers Founda-tion has changed their fundraising and activi-ties focus. The group will begin using the funds they are able to accumulate through fundraising activities, donations, and grant Color of carsBY LYNNE BLACKManaging Editor Main Street in Floodwood sported a rainbow of colors on Saturday, September 18, during the annual Fall Color Festival. Classic cars from all over Minnesota and as far away as Ontario, Canada came to town for the event.“This was close to the largest car show ever in Floodwood,” said Don “Ducco” Arro, organizer of the event. Ducco said there were 150 classic cars regis-tered for the show, with another “around 20” who were just there to display their cars.The classic car show is an annual event held during Color Festival. Main Street in Floodwood is lined on both sides with picture-perfect restor-tion of cars dating from the 1920s to 2010.This year, the cars were also parked on Main Street to the east of Highway 73, Railroad Street, and Pine Street. Because the weather was clear and sunny, the classic car owners were happy to bring them into Floodwood to show them off.As the sun gleamed and refl ected off the shiny chrome and gleaming paint jobs, participants walked from car to car comparing notes on the best 25 cars in the show. Rather than having the winners declared by a handful of judges, each registered participant is given a ballot at the be-ginning of the day to list their favorite 25 cars. At the end of the day, ballots are counted, and the See COLOR OF CARS on page 11 Tveit illustrates book ST. PAUL, Minn.—Jasen Tveit, grandson of Floodwood resident Dinah Tveit and Bob and Joyce Andrews, illustrated a children’s book called The BOX-ELDER BUG Who Needed A HUG, by Jesse Justin Meyers and Sandra Kay Bouressa.Jesse Meyers died in July of 2008, while crossing a road in Anoka, Minnesota. His mother, Sandra Bouressa, took a poem Jesse wrote and had it published as a children’s book.Sandra found Jasen on Craig’s list and felt his illustrations best fi t the personality of the boxelder bug featured in the book. —Tveit illustrates see page 2 FLOODWOOD FALL COLOR FESTIVAL Ness township zoning moves to next phase VIRGINIA, Minn.—The St. Louis County Commissioners ended the fi rst phase of the re-zoning controversy in Ness Township. On Tues-day, September 14, the commissioners voted fi ve to two in favor of changing 1,200 acres in Ness Township from Multiple Use Non-Shoreland (MUNS-5) to Forest Agricultural Management (FAM-3). Commissioner Dennis Fink, First District, said he felt the township residents were equally divided on the issue “There was no clear majority for either side,” he stated. Commissioner and Board Chair Steve Raukar, Seventh District, stated that he felt the rezoning question would never have been discussed had the proposed game farm not needed it.“A clear majority of those who spoke were against the decision [to approve the rezoning],” stated Commissioner Raukar, “but it is what it is. FALL COLORS IN FLOODWOOD: Classic cars from the 20th and 21st centuries line Main Street in Floodwood. Over 150 cars were in town for the festival on September 18. —Ness Township see page 3 —Changing focus see page 9 Photo by JOHN GRONES Portage News All Dailies–50 entries First Place: Duluth News Tribune, Clint Austin Marathon runner A clear winner. Judge was impressed with combination of content and framing. The photographer captured a special moment. A great, great photo. Second Place: The Journal, New Ulm, Steve Muscatello Pure Magic Facial expressions and emotion can move readers. This photographer understood that. Good job. Honorable Mention: Duluth News Tribune, Clint Austin Inline skater Just a really nice photo, which is why we’re throwing it an honorable mention! Weeklies up to 1,500–12 entries First Place: Portage News, Floodwood, John Grones Fall Color Festival Great collection of photos from a very messy event - the pie eating contest! Second Place: Chatfield News, Gretchen Mensink Lovejoy President Obama visits Chatfield Nice set of photos chronicling President Obama’s visit. The large image of President Obama with the group of children will be a keepsake for many, I’m sure. Honorable Mention: Republican-Leader, Preston, Lisa Brainard & Larry Johnson Celebrate I love the emotion captured in these photos. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–31 entries First Place: Jackson County Pilot, Ryan Brinks One Last Look Outstanding job of visually recording a wonderful piece of history that will no longer be. Second Place: Lake County News-Chronicle, Two Har- bors, Mike Creger A Teen Trio Triumphs Tough category to pick a winner. Outstanding job telling the three students’ story. B4 Thursday, December 30, 201 0 ONE LAST LOOK Photos by Ryan Brinks Piece by piece, some of th e most prominent interior features of Jackson’s old h igh school have been dism antled and salvaged this week ahead of the bui lding’s imminent demolit ion. Now long void of the hustle and bustle of stude nts passing through the halls, standing at chalk boards, running on the gy m floor and sitting in the auditorium, these images from last week represent one last look ins ide the 1938-built Jackson County Resource Center. Feature Photo CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Photo Story
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 45  ID EA S We welcome suggestions We’d love to hear from you about ideas for this page. Send your story suggestions to Editor N athan Bowe at nbowe@dlnewspapers.com or call 218- 847-3151. TELL US WHAT YOU THINK feedb ack@dlnewspapers.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011 • THE TRIBUNE • 1C Detroit Lakes’ annual winter celebration kicks off with a bang THE VERN TURNER MEMORIAL B ONSPIEL was held last weekend at the Lakes Curling Club. Ric hard Howden of Fargo (top) eyes the rock he just released during S aturday’s curling. Jim An- derson of Detroit Lakes and Greg Delic h of Evelyth (middle) fever- ishly sweep the ice in front of Jim Sin clair’s rock during the bon- spiel Saturday. Gabe Dretsch of Frazee ( above) passes the time peer- ing down his fishing hole during the P oles ‘n Holes Fishing Der- by. Dretsch had the heaviest fish for a bout two hours during the derby and wished the time would pass more quickly. He ended up taking first place and winning $10,00 0 for the 2.58-pound north- ern he caught. Polar Fest time A MOTORCYCLE buzzes by during Sa turday’s Polar Fest Motorcycle Ice Raci ng event on Big Detroit Lake in front of the Hol iday Inn. PHOTOS BY BRIAN BASHAM KEN WAGNER of Detroit Lakes walks his 1.48-pound northern to the weigh sta- tion at the Poles ‘n Holes fishing derby Saturday af- ternoon. Wagner took fourth place with his fish and won an Astro Start. JOHANNA GRIMSLEY (right) was crowned Miss Polar Fest 2011 Sunday night at the Historic Holmes Theatre, while Alexa Er- ickson (far right) was crowned Miss Teen Polar Fest. The Poles ‘n Holes Fishing Derby (below) brought more than 600 anglers onto the ice of Little Detroit Lake Saturday afternoon. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–25 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Brian Basham Polar Fest time The variety of photos on this page create a nice package that tell the overall story. Great use of low angle, wide angle and other techniques show the photographer’s grasp of the craft. Second Place: Chaska Herald, Mark W. Olson They’ve got it bagged up Photo stories should tell a story with little or no words needed to help move the story along. This package does just that. The main image shows the magnitude of the effort and the secondary images compliment it very well. Weeklies over 5,000–13 entries First Place: White Bear Press, Paul Dols Fire on Ice Great color...you can feel the warmth from the flame. Second Place: Red Wing Republican Eagle, Stacy Bengs Who’s watching Sharp color and unique angles. Nice! Honorable Mention: Hutchinson Leader, Doug Hanneman Walking in the doggone rain Cute, cute, cute. Great shots All Dailies–26 entries First Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester, Ken Klotzbach A Vote for Freedom Strong subject matter. The variation of photos help to put this story above the rest. Second Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester, Elizabeth Nida Obert Farmer Pam Benike Interesting mix of photos. Evening photo was a bonus. Photo Story SECTION B Inside: Sports Classifi eds Dial-A-Specialist Legals WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2011 WHITE BEAR PRESS/VADNAIS HEIGHTS PRESS Briarcliff Manor Newly updatedapartment community. 55 and over. Located in quiet Mahtomedi. 1, 2 & 3 BR apts avail. Heat paid, resident activities, underground parking. 1br $751, 2br $900, 3br $1,039-$1,290 Call 651-426-7960 rground par $751, 2br $9 br $1,039-$1,29 Call 651-426-7960 cated in qu Mahtomedi. & 3 BR apts avHeat paid, residen activities,underground parking an ly upd partmen ommunity 55 and over. L d i i 1st month FREE Norgard Court Apartments 1807 Gervais Ct. Maplewood 651-777-5020 Senior Living 1st Month FREE • Laundry in every unit • FREE Breakfast twice/week • Dogs welcome on 1st floor • Underground heated parking • Close to shopping • Bingo, Cards, Music, Casino Buses At Cities, it’sall about you. We know you by name,not by account balance. Cities Credit Union3625 Talmage Circle, Vadnais Hts.651-426-3773 • citiescu.org Become a member of Cities today! • Loan and savings rates that beat most banks and other credit unions • Checking with no monthly fees • Access over 30,000 fee-free ATMs • 24/7 account access • Dog-friendly office • Much more! Your best source for community information. Japanese Steak House OSAKA www.osakatogo.com • 651.773.52581900 Cty Rd D East Maplewood Maplewood Commons / Across from Macy’s Seafood • Steak • Sushi Bar • Hibachi Grill Free Birthday Person Hibachi with party for 8 Celebrate Your Birthday at Osaka 15% OFF Dinner Want the Best? (651) 484-3326 www.kathhvac.com www.kathelectric.com Kath Heating, Air Conditioning & Electrical st m t? Call us now. Ask about our specials! Federal Tax CreditsExtended for 2011! White Bear Decals forAutos, Windows, Doors available at Medicine Chest Pharmacy & Camera 2187 Fourth St. Wh Br Lk, MN 55110 429-5356 Pharmacy 429-6347 Photo Hours: M-Th 9-7 Fri-Sat 9-6 Sun Closed • SUN COLOR DIGITAL & FILM PROCESSING STOCK UP NOW www.pinetreeapple orchard.com Save on Original Frozen Apple Pies & Selected Bakery Products Off E. Hwy 96 on Apple Orchard Rd. Call for February & March hours! PINE TREE ORCHARDNorth of White Bear Lake 651-429-7202 Fire on ice Midwinter pep fest - Photos by Paul Dols Above: Senior boys debut the dance moves they have been rehearsing during a group dance that was among the Silverbelle Pep Fest activities Fri-day, Feb. 4 at Mahtomedi High School. At left: Silverbelle Senior Queen Cady Buche and King Brenton Braddock make quick (and winning) work of removing Oreos from a panel of Plexiglas. The activities were a prelude to the dance on Saturday night. Find more photos and a video clip from the event online at www.presspubs.com. Above: Area residents are dwarfed by a giant fl aming pyre (constructed using approximately 275 discarded Christmas trees) on Bald Eagle Lake during the “Flaming Tree” ritual Saturday, Feb. 5. A neighborhood group has organized the spectacle for the past 11 years. Light wind and a relatively moderate winter temperature made for ideal conditions for the lighting. Volunteers began assembling the project at noon and the fi re department was notifi ed in advance of the ceremonial lighting, at right, by appointed “Commodores” and “Commodivas.” Find more photos and a video clip from the event online at www.presspubs.com. Above: A trail of glow-ing sparks drifts skyward above the fi re. - Photos by Paul Dols • • • • • • • • POST-BULLETIN • www.postbulletin.com SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 2011 A 5 Local news Page edited by Randi Kallas, kallas@pos tbulletin.com A VOTE FOR FREEDOM A Sudanese woman waves a cross on the bus ride. About the photographer Ken Klotzbach has been a photograph er with the Post-Bulletin for eight years . Reporting the story: “It is rare to wit ness history in the making, rarer still to realize it at the moment. The group of southern Sudanese refugees who made the trip from Rochester to Omaha, Neb., to make their historic vote, knew it. Desp ite the long bus ride and the hours waiting outside in the falling snow, they were jubilant with the conviction that their f uture would be better. It was an honor to accompany them on the final leg of the ir journey.” About the writer Christina Killion Valdez has been a re porter with the Post-Bulletin for 10 yea rs. Reporting the story: “Not only do I fe el like I witnessed history by being ther e for a vote, which may ultimately lead to the world’s newest country, but I also f eel like I witnessed democracy. That started with the various meetings of the south ern Sudanese community leading up to the referendum, where as a group the peo ple decided who should pay what to ride t he bus — $100 for people with full-tim e jobs so people without jobs could ride free. And ended with people putting their fa ith for a peaceful future in the hands of a democratic vote.” Cold voters waiting in line look thro ugh the win- dow as voters register to cast ballots on the Suda- nese referendum. Singing and storytelling filled the tim e on the bus. From the left are Natalina Mabeing, Ayen Kang and Nyanko Machr. Austin residents wait to vote in Oma ha, Neb., on a referendum to determine if Sudan splits into two. David Acuoth drops to his knees in j oy after casting his ballot for southe rn Sudan to be given its freedom fro m Sudan. He is holding what could b e southern Sudan’s flag. Elizabeth Ater, Elizabeth Bec, Yar Ka ng and Nakuer Kuer, sing and dance in the snow after voting Jan. 9 in Omaha. A carboard booth provides privacy as a voter marks his ballot on Jan. 9. The index fingers of voters are mark ed with purple ink.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 46 Weeklies up to 1,500–12 entries First Place: Westbrook Sentinel/Tribune, Tom Merchant Too Much Water Great action shot. Faces are priceless. Second Place: Kenyon Leader, Terri Washburn Carriage and Cutter: Tradition in the snow Wonder what they’re talking about? Perfect shot at the perfect moment. Honorable Mention: Westbrook Sentinel/Tribune, Tom Merchant Beef Royale Too cute! Nice photo. Weeklies 1,501-2,500–19 entries First Place: Pelican Rapids Press, Jeff Meyer Taking a break on the mound Adorable photo, captures the moment well. Illustrates the short attention span pre-little league set. Second Place: ECM Post Review, North Branch, Victoria Dahlin The big splash Great photo that captures the excitement of a day at the pool with dad. Weeklies 2,501-5,000–19 entries First Place: Hastings Star Gazette, Chad Richardson Fire and rain Really great image. Photographer has a good eye and must always be on the lookout for that one shot . . . good job of seeing the shot! Second Place: Anoka County Union, Tammy Sakry Future builder? Nice impression captured. Waited for the right moment and was ready to capture it . . . good job. Portrait and Personality Photo STATE GOLF PAGE 9 4H DAY CAMP PAGE 10 !"#$%&'()*+,%-.*/001 -2/3#'4'5*'&%*)'"''*/00 1-2/3# Serving: Walnut G rove, Westbrook, Currie, Storden, Dovray, and Rev ere areas INDEX ON RECORD PAGE 2 INSIDE PAGE 3 VIEWPOINT PAGE 4 FAITH & FAMILY PAGE 5 COMMUNITY PAGE 6 COMMUNITY PAGE 7 EDUCATION PAGE 8 SPORTS PAGE 9 AREA FOCUS PAGE 10 CLASSIFIED ADS PAGE 11 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT PAGE 12 CONTACT US !"#$%&'(!$"))))*))+,'--!#!./-))*)'/0.%(! -!"1 CIRCULATION 507­2 74­6136 OR 800­410­1859 Please read and recycle Printed with Soybased Ink Copyright 2011 Sentinel Tr ibune By Karley Deprez Intern Writer   Westbrook Fun Days 201 1. Fun Days will  be held,  June 23  through Ju ne 26. This year  there  will  be  entertainmen t  for  kids  of  all  ages.   On  Thursday,  June  2 3,  the  Sanford  Westbrook Hospital will  ser ve BBQ’s  to  the  community  from  5:00  to  6 :30  p.m. At  7:00  there  will  be  an  “Evening  of  Praise”  at  the  community  center. Be  sure  to  taste  the  deli­ cious desserts, while you’re  there!   Friday,  June  24  starting  at  1:00  p.m.  the  Heritage Health Care Found ation will be hav­ ing  a  3­person  golf  scramb le  at  the  Rolling  Hills Golf Course.   Later  in  the  evening,  the   event  you  have  been waiting  for,  entertainm ent  by  the  2011  Miss  Westbrook  Scholarsh ip  Program.  The  theme  this  year  is  “Be  Yo ur  Own  Kind  of  Beautiful.”  This  years  cand idates  are  Dana  Kells  daughter  of  Mike  an d  Lairdie  Kells,  Micaela  Grams  daughter  o f  Eric  and  Sally  Grams, Karley Deprez  daug hter  of Paul  and  Susan Deprez, Amelia Malm berg daughter of  Dale and Merna Malmberg,  Jamie Olson daughter of B utch  and  Sherry  Olson.  There  will  also  be  six  Little  M iss  Westbrook girls participating . The program starts at 7:00 p .m.  at the high school auditorium .   The  pictures  of  the  Mis s  Westbrook  candidates  ar e  in   Thrifty White  Pharmacy. Y ou  can  go  in  and  vote  for  Miss  Photogenic.    After the crowning of Mis s Westbrook, a Street Dance  will  follow. The band that will be  playing this year is “The Mi xx.”  The dance will take place at  the Loose Moose.   Starting  at  8:00  a.m.  Sat urday,  a  citywide  rummage   sale  will take place. Crazy Daze  will be held on Main Stree t and  the  Sand  Volleyball  Tournament will be played  at the park. These activities  will  start at 9:00 a.m.    Fun Days Expo, at the com munity center and Library B ook  Sale & Fund raiser will start  at 9:00 a.m. The Fun Days E xpo  is an Expo with products of A von, Mary Kay, Pampered C hef,  Home Craft  items  and man y more  venders. The  Fun D ays  Expo ends at 2:00 p.m.  Libr ary Book Sale & Fund raiser  will  be selling items for six dolla rs each and will be located a t the  senior center.    At 10:00 a.m. VFW Baseb all will start. It will be playe d at  the high school baseball fiel d.   The Summer Olympi cs is in the park. The  games will begin at 10:30 a. m. If you get hungry  go and support the Westbroo k Walnut Grove FFA  Whopper Feed in the park. F FA will start to serve  Whoppers at 10:30 a.m. unt il 2:00 p.m.   The Westbrook Waln ut Grove School will  be  putting  on  a  School  S urplus  Fund  raiser  Auction at the High School.  The proceeds will go  to  the  band  and  choir  trip  and  student  athletic  department.   Make  sure  you  stop   by  the  Westbrook  Heritage  House  Museum  and  learn  about  the  town’s history.    The Westbrook Heri tage House Museum  will be opening at 11:00 a.m . to 3:00 p.m.   Want  more  entertai nment,  head  to  the  Pedal Tractor Pull. Ages 4­1 1 are able to partici­ pate  in  the  Pedal  Tractor  Pull.  Westbrook  Ag  Power sponsors the game. Karley Depre z M icaela Gram s Dana Kells Amelia Malm berg J amie Olson Friday night five young ladies will vie in the Miss Westbrook Scholarsh ip Program, along with a Little Mi ss Westbrook to be chosen Kids — Pick it up — get Free Tickets for the pool By Karley Dep rez, intern writ er   Walnut Grove kids want to  go  swimming for free? All you  have  to do is help your city by pi cking  up garbage in the park. Brin g  your garbage to Paula McGa rvey,  city clerk of Walnut Grove,  and  get your free ticket to go sw im­ ming at the Westbrook Pool !   The bus schedule to bring  kids  to the Westbrook Pool is 1:0 0  p.m. and return to Walnut G rove   is 4:00 p.m.   The bus stop to the pool w ill be  at the Walnut Grove City Pa rk. Fun Days 2011 kicks off Thursday Wednesday June 22, 2011 $1.00 VOLUME NO. 26 NUMBER 43 12 PAGES Plus supplements in local edition Fun — Continued on page 3 ! Gold Finch at Talcot Lake Little Miss Westbrook candidates From left: Kierra Smith, Emma Wa hl, Halle Steen, Lexi Herding, Camryn Bunting, Bailey Anderson. Submitted photo Too Much Water About six inches of water inundated the area last Tuesday ! Water — Cont. on page 3 Chase Knudson and Samantha Ward of Walnut Grove ran through a huge pond in the city park Wednesday afternoon. By Tom Merchant Sentinel Tribun e SPECIAL — The old adage “when it rains it po urs” was self evident last week as heavy rains inunda ted the area. It was a relative ly small cell that blossomed in to a fair­ ly large area last Tuesday morning. On the wea ther ser­ vice radar it looked like it would be out of the area by early afternoon. However mother nature had ot her plans as the system stalled out and redeveloped most of t he after­ noon. Before it was o ver the Highway 14 corridor appeared to get the worst of it w ith local reports of up to seve n and a half inches in the Tr acy area. Some area observers noticed the rain was falling at about an inch per hour mu ch of the day. Volume 117 No. 27 Otter Tail County Single Copy $1 PELICAN RAPIDS, MINNESOTA TH E RESSP July 6, 2011 THANK YOUFORCHOOSINGTHEPELICAN RAPIDS PRESS Obituaries • Edward Lammers 81,Barnesville • Jolyn Priem 52, Vergas • Charles Chapman 87,Dent To see all the photosthat were taken in thepast three months visit our web site www.pelicanrapidspress.com Watch for all thePelican Fest Photos next week Public Notices in this issue • Notice of Foreclosure • Pelican TownshipNotice • Lida Township Notice • Scambler TownshipNotice • City of Pelican RapidsCouncil Minutes • Dunn Township Notice • Norwegian GroveTownship Notice Mercantile continued on page 5 The mid-summer festival inPelican Rapids is a long tradi-tion–with a new name and anincreasingly wide array of events. “Pelican Fest” is July 8-9, andwill feature a packed schedule ofactivities including two streetdances, concessions, a classic carshow and the centerpiece parade at11 a.m. on Saturday plus manyother events.For decades named “TurkeyDays” to recognize the impor-tance of the turkey industry to thelocal economy, the Chamber ofCommerce has retitled the event“Pelican Fest” to broaden itsscope. Turkey remains an importantpart of the event–and the econo-my, as the West Central Turkeyprocessing plant continues to bethe city’s top employer. Turkeyproduction in outlying farms con-tinues to be a crucial agri-busi-ness in the Pelican Rapids areaand Otter Tail County. The Pelican Rapids RotaryClub will host its popular TurkeyBarbeque, from 11 a.m. to 2p.m., Saturday, July 9, in recog-nition of area turkey growers andthe turkey processingindustry–which dates back morethan a half-century in Pelican. After a successful first year in New name forJuly 8-9 celebration FROM Turkey Days TO PPeelliiccaannFFeesstt The 11 a.m. parade, picturedabove at the 2010 event, is one ofmany highlights of the July 8-9“Pelican Fest.” The traditional turkey barbequecontinues as a tradition forPelican Fest–formerly “TurkeyDays.” Members of the PelicanRapids Area Rotary Club preparegrilled turkey for the Saturdayfeast. Pelican Fest continued on page 5 PHILIP DYKHOFF decided he had enough of batting practice during T-Ball practice last Wednesday and found the pitching mound a perfect place to take a break. Philip is the son of Brian and Nancy Dykhoff of rural Erhard. TAKING A BREAK ON THE MOUND The newest specialty retail shop inPelican Rapids opened mid-June, andoperators expect to be in full swingwith an official grand opening duringPelican Fest July 8-9.“Mercantile on Main” is a uniqueventure, operated in a cooperative fash-ion by more than 21 local artisans,crafters, antique vendors and retailers. The shop is located in the formerPark Region Cenex complex, justsouth of the new city liquor store. Inventory at “Mercantile on Main”is, literally, “soup to art” with special-ty and ethnic food products. Crafts andart pieces by a number of artisans aredisplayed throughout–including rugs, artprints, jewelry, yarns, sewing products,photography, antiques, collectibles, Mercantile on Main Specialty retail shop is a cooperativeof many Pelican area vendors, artisans MERCANTILE ON MAIN Pictured here with the “Mercantile onMain” signage are Judy Tabbut andKathy Bergren, who are president andvice president of the Mercantile board.Glenace Metcalfe is secretary and JulieMeyer is the treasurer. By Louis Hoglund Mill Street could also be known as“Ministry Street,” with the plannedaddition of “The Welcome Place” nextdoor to the “Pass It On” thrift store. “The Welcome Place” is a multi-church project, under the umbrella ofTrinity Lutheran, and is intended toserve as a “hospitable space to gather,to build relationships through crosscultural interaction, and to provide for unmet needs in the community.”The building for the proposed centerwould be part of a row of ministry-related storefronts. The thrift store.,which opened seven years ago, is adja-cent to the “Welcome Place” proposal,at 26 Mill Street. On the other side is the Pelican AreaFood Shelf and the Lutheran SocialServices Immigrant Refugee Resettle-ment Office. On the other end of theblock is the Dawo Halal Somali Mar- ket, which also has a Islamic Mosque-Prayer Room. “This isn’t necessarily a new idea,”said Rev. Laurie Skow-Anderson, ofTrinity Lutheran. “We’ve talked aboutan outreach center...but we never had aplace to do it.”When they learned that a buildingwas vacated at a strategic location,brainstorming sessions were held, andfrom those meetings a founding board ‘Welcome Place’ Gathering spot would be new ministry in Pelican SHUT DOWNSHUT DOWN Friday Morning Maplewood State Park had barricades blocking the entrance to the park. Because of the State government shut- down Park Manager Don DelGreco was forced to put up barri- cades. Welcome Place continued on page 5 .04” 2.15” PELICAN RAPIDS WEATHER REPORT Date Snowfall Snow Cover Precip 6/25/11 6/26/11 .05” 6/27/11 .61” 6/28/11 .22” 6/29/11 6/30/11 7/1/11 Date Snowfall Snow Cover Precip 6/2510 .22” 6/26/10 6/27/10 6/28/10 .44” Trace 6/29/10 6/30/10 7/1/10 7/2/10 2010 7/3/10 7/4/10 7/5/10 7/6/10 7/7/10 .16” Trace7/8/10 Prairie Days at Rothsay this weekend Prairie Days is set forFriday - Sunday, July 8-10. Many events areplanned including a vari-ety show & dinner,Shatter the Silence walk,parade, dances and manymore events throughoutthe weekend. See ad onpage 9 for a full listingof events. The community ofRothsay celebrated its125th Anniversary July,2008. The event was such a great success thatthe members of theRothsay Area Community Fund spear-headed the efforts alongwith other communitymembers to continue anannual celebration that isnow called “RothsayPrairie Days”. The goalof the Prairie Days is tooffer a fun weekend com-munity celebration forall ages. Many unique items are availableat the Mercantile on Main.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 47  Weeklies over 5,000–6 entries First Place: Wright County Journal-Press, Buffalo, Heather Reinhart Stunned Homecoming King Crowned Love it! Second Place: Lakeshore Weekly News, Wayzata, Mark Trockman Focused on Design Nice, not your everyday profile photo. All Dailies–40 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times, Dave Schwarz Partners Partners is a wonderful peak moment that needs no accompanying words as it captures the intensity of both the officer and his police work dog as they operate as one team. The eyes of both are revealing as is the body language of both. The chosen lens focal length and its accompanying shallow depth-of-field keeps the busy background from overpowering the crucial elements of the photo. Extremely well done in a fluid situation. Second Place: St. Cloud Times, Jason Wachter Making a Splash Making a Splash is a beautiful image and appears technically flawless. Well planned and great use of light and water to enhance the obvious gracefulness of the swimmer. Portrait and Personality Photo
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 48 Weeklies up to 2,500–7 entries First Place: Lake County News-Chronicle, Two Harbors, Matt Suoja Tracking Your Food Prices Useful feature, tracking the increase in food prices. Good use of photos and text to illustrate the feature. Second Place: Jordan Independent, Mathias Baden, David Schueller & Design Staff Renewed bicycle routes Fantastic use of photos and a well-designed map + sidebar to illustrate the story. Weeklies over 2,500–9 entries First Place: Woodbury / South Maplewood Review, Nik VanDenMeerendonk Minnesota’s Apple Orchards are in Full Swing Great use of photos, graphics and creative fonts to create an inviting front page feature package. Second Place: Woodbury / South Maplewood Review, Nik VanDenMeerendonk Ghost Busted Great photo illustration, punctuated by a spooky font, to set the tone for this front-page feature story. All Dailies–9 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times, Lisa Mueller Your Voice Very informative and certainly a reader-friendly graphic. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Troy Becker What does Thanksgiving dinner cost? Nice combination of photo and graphic information. SHORELINES WWW.TWOHARBORSMN.COM PAGE 1B FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 2011 News ●Chronicle Want more history? The Lake County Historical Society is a good place to start. It’s at the Depot in Two Harbors, 834- 4898 or visit lakecountyhis- toricalsociety.org. There’s also the Bay Area Historical Soci- ety in Silver Bay (226- 4534), the Finland Histori- cal Society (353-7380 or 353-7550), and the Histori- cal Committee of the Isabella Community Council (323- 7644). LAKE COUNTY PAST 100 YEARS AGO, 1911 The Barley & Bailum’s Big Consolidated Indoor Circus and side shows will arrive in Two Harbors on Friday. Taking five trains to carry the traveling city, it arrives with the dawn, dazzles the eye with its glittering pageant, dis- plays its thousand wonders and then vanishes in the night with the fascinating, and mysterious speed of a comet. Mr. Watson, gener- al manager of the great ag- gregation of wonders, has secured a number of lead- ing features from Mr. John Ringling for this occasion. No more green tea The National Tea Board, branch of the pure food commission, has de- cided that green tea can- not in the future pass the custom office. Tea that is green is green only be- cause it is colored with a copper powder for preser- vative purposes. Tea at the pleasant afternoon func- tions will now be black tea, which is cured by be- ing left out in the sun or yellow or straw colored, the color of green picked tea when dried and devoid of any “embalming.” 75 YEARS AGO, 1936 109 of the 176 old age pension applications have been approved by the county board and checks were mailed out for April. The average for the first 84 approved will be about $20 a month. Off to Isle Royale Fishermen will gain three weeks of trout fish- ing through accommoda- tions of Captain Egeland. Without the protection of the cutter it would have been a dangerous trip for the little craft. Generally fisherman have to depend on the Winyah which is ice bound in the Duluth harbor until the west winds blow the ice out in- to the lake. The Crawford will put in at Grand Marais and pick up several fishermen there who are going to the island. 50 YEARS AGO, 1961 Roger Pegelow, Lake County Civil Defense di- rector, today issued the following statement in re- gard to survival in case of nuclear attack: “Of course, there is little chance of survival of a direct hit by a nuclear device, but science has found lately there is a very good chance of sur- vival from fall-out if prop- er precautions are taken. The attitude of an ostrich, that of hiding its head in the ground and waiting for the inevitable, is not the proper survival tech- nique of thinking Ameri- cans.” 25 YEARS AGO, 1986 After a year’s hiatus, the “Melodrama in the Park” is back. Every Friday evening in July the Two Harbors Family Theatre will present a melodrama at Owens Park bandshell. Golf lessons 1. Don’t be embar- rassed on the course be- cause you have not played before. 2. Don’t bet with ailing golfers or others you don’t know. 3. Check yourself for an ailment (ie: gimpy leg, bursitis or bandaged thumb), or 4. Don’t pay for lessons, take free advice found on the course. From Lake County newspaper archives. CALENDAR Event listings are free and run from the time they are received until the date passes. Email your listing to chronicle@lc newschronicle.com or call 834-2141. Our address can be found on Page 4A. TODAY 22 The program “Nature In Story,” 2:30 p.m., at Two Harbors Public Library. It will be held at 11 a.m. at the Silver Bay Public Library. SATURDAY 23 Voyageur Snowmobile Club Spring Fling Fund-raiser, 5-8 p.m., at the Moose Lodge. Silen t auction, raffles, and spaghetti dinner. MONDAY 25 THHS Relay for Life, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., in Two Harbors High School auditorium. TUESDAY 26 ● Two Harbors Utilities Committee meeting, 1 p.m., in conference room at city hall. ● Poets Connie Wanek and Louis Jenkins will have a program, 6:30 p.m., at Two Harbors Public Library. ● Township Knitters meeting, 6:30 p.m., at Duluth Town Hall. WEDNESDAY 27 ● Out to lunch with Socially Active Seniors, noon, at Betty's Pie. Register by April 25. Call 830-0600. Transportation avail- able. ● Age 55 and older driver improvement program, 5:30- 9:30 p.m., at Silver Bay schools . Cost is $20. More, call (888) 234-1294. THURSDAY 28 ● “Living Well” workshop focused on seniors, 12:30-3 p.m., at location TBD. Call Community Partners at 834-8024 for more information. It will run on Thursdays for six weeks. ● Friends of the Library meeting, 6:30 p.m., at Two Harbors Public Library. ● Joint Duluth Township Board/planning commission meeting, 5:30 p.m., at Duluth Town Hall. ● Duluth Planning Commission meeting, 7 p.m., at Duluth Town Hall. ● Narcotics Anonymous meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., at Lake View Memorial Hospital. APRIL 29 ● Two Harbors Children’s Drama Club will perform “Oh No and Here We Go: A Fairy Tale Mix- up,” 7 p.m., at Two Harbors Community Center. A good-will donation is suggested. ● Silver Creek Town Hall dance/social, 7-11 p.m. Severa l local musicians donate their music for a night of dancing. APRIL 30 Order of St. Luke Conference on healing prayer, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., at First Lutheran Church in Duluth, 1100 E. Superior St. Ca ll Jan at 834-4158 for more infor - mation. MAY 2 Two Harbors High School band and city band combined concert , 7:30 p.m., at THHS auditorium. MAY 3 ● Silver Bay Relay for Life kickoff event, 6 p.m., at Sychar Lutheran Church. More, call 226-4576. ● Two Harbors bands 6-8 con- cert, 7 p.m., at THHS auditori- um. MAY 5 Two Harbors Cable TV Commission meeting, 8 p.m., at The Place (community center). MAY 6 Thank you party for Jim Obersta r for his support of the Clair Nelson Intermodal Center, 3-5 p.m., at the center. MAY 9 Jazz band concert and pie social, 7 p.m., at THHS auditori- um. MAY 14 Two Harbors Post Office Stamp Out Hunger event. Place bags o f nonperishable food items next to your mailbox. tracking your food prices Shredded cheddar cheese (up 47 cents a pound) Nation: $4.63 Minnesota: $4.11 Two Harbors Super One: $4.44 Zup’s in Silver Bay: $5.38 Vegetable oil (up 29 cents for 32 ounces) Nation: $2.88 Minnesota: $2.66 Super One: $1.66 Zup’s: $2.62 Flour (up 52 cents for five- pound bag) Nation: $2.51 Minnesota: $2.57 Super One: $1.97 Zup’s: $2.53 Boneless chicken breasts (up 22 cents per pound) Nation: $3.32 Minnesota: $3.06 Super One: $4.71 Zup’s: $3.99 Orange juice (up 17 cents for a half gallon) Nation: $3.14 Minnesota: $3.16 Super One: $3.19 Zup’s: $3.79 Russett potatoes (up 14 cents for five-pound bag) Nation: $2.64 Minnesota: $2.65 Super One: $1.69 Zup’s: $2.50 Bread (up 13 cents for a 20-ounce loaf ) Nation: $1.88 Minnesota: $1.90 Super One: $1.40 Zup’s: $1.59 Whole milk (up 11 cents a gallon) Nation: $3.46 Minnesota: $3.87 Super One: $4.29 Zup’s: $3.99 Sliced deli ham (up 7 cents a pound) Nation: $4.91 Minnesota: $4.23 Super One: $4.44 Zup’s: $6.20 Eggs (up 2 cents a dozen) Nation: $1.62 Minnesota: $1.54 Super One: $1.69 Zup’s: $1.53 Sirloin tip roast (up 1 cent per pound) Nation: $3.96 Minnesota: $4.27 Super One: $4.69 Zup’s: $3.99 Bacon (down 46 cents per pound) Nation: $3.86 Minnesota: $3.87 Super One: $3.49 Zup’s: $4.67 Red Delicious apples (no change) Nation: $1.45 Minnesota: $1.59 Super One: $1.59 Zup’s: $1.33 Retail food prices increased duri ng the first quarter of 2011 nati onwide, according to the latest American Farm Bureau Federatio n’s “Marketbasket Survey” that in cluded comparisons to average costs in state by the Minnesota Farm Bureau. The News-Chronicle did its own local survey on food prices at g rocery stores to see how they compare to sta te and national averages. We visited SuperOne in Two Har bors and Zup’s in Silver Bay for some price comparisons. It’s not a scientific study and pric es can fluctuate for a variety of r easons. We looked for the cheapest pric es we could find for the foods o utside of special sales. Price increases shown are for na tional average in first three months of 2011. Volume 30, Number 39 Monday, Sept. 27, 2010 WSM A Lillie Suburban Newspaper www.lillienews.com Woodbury•South Maplewood Serving Woodbury and South Maplewood VTEst.1968 3001 Hwy. 61 N., Maplewood • (South of I-694) • www.venburgtire.com THE VENBURG EXTRAS• mounting • balancing • valve system • environmental charges • rotation 651.483.2601 • Shocks • Struts • Brakes • Alignments • Exhaust • Batteries WE ARE OPEN: M-F 7AM-6PM, SAT. 8AM-2PM Venburg Tire 41FAMILY OWNE D & OP ER AT ED FO R O VE R Emergency Home & Auto Open-Ups Commercial Residential Quality Keys Made 651-730-7524 • 651-226-8189 Steve Montgomeryg y Oakdale Locksmiths Lamp Repair For FREE Inspection Call651-777-2913 WaterHeatersMade In The USA By Bradford White $720.00 Parts + LaborInstalledHigh Recovery PRIMEAU’S TREE SERVICECertifi ed ArboristFREE Estimates38 Years ExperienceFamily Owned 651-773-5643 • Advertising campaigns • Business cards • Letterhead • Envelopes • Postcards • Carbonless contracts • Posters • Banners • Newsletters • Mailing & bindery • Raffl e tickets • Brochures • Newspapers • And much more! CALL HOLLY 651-748-7863 CALL PAUL 651-748-7862 WE HAVE BEEN GROWING LOCAL BUSINESSES FOR OVER 73 YEARS aving goodbye to summer in Min- nesota is always tough, but many of us revel in the short but sweet fall season. We love to marvel at the red, orange and golden hues of the falling leaves, and the crisp air often feels like paradise after a hot, steamy summer. And just because leaves and temperatures are drop-ping doesn’t mean we should all begin hibernating for the winter. There’s still plenty of time to head out to one of Minnesota’s many apple orchards for a guaran-teed good time. Orchards galoreApple lovers in the Twin Cities have a wide selection of orchards from which to choose. Victoria Valley Orchard in Shoreview, Aamodt’s Apple Orchard in Grant and Pine Tree Apple Orchard in White Bear Lake are a few popular spots in the area.At V i c t o r i a Va l l ey Orchard, customers will receive lots of personal attention since it’s on the smaller side, says owner Molly Papenheim. The orchard’s small size also means it’s able to refrig-erate its apples, a definite plus when looking for high-quality fruit. Though the apples at Vic-toria Valley Orchard are all pre-picked, those hoping to pick their own apples can head to Aamodt’s Apple Orchard. Since locally grown apples ripened early this year, the pick-your-own season will be ending shortly. Aamodt’s is also unique in that it is the only apple orchard in Minnesota with a vineyard on site. And if you’re looking for an action-packed day, try out a few of the many fam-ily-friendly activities these orchards have to offer.At Aamodt’s, you can hop on a hayride, pet some farm animals or explore the hay bale maze. Kids can head to John Deere Kiddie Trike and Tractor Farm for $1.At Pine Tree Apple Orchard, visitors can watch the apple sorting process, enjoy musical entertain-ment, take a ride on a wagon or pony, meander through a corn maze and take a trip to the pumpkin patch as Hal-loween approaches. Also, check out Pine Tree Apple Orchard’s bak-ery where you’ll find bags of freshly packed apples and all sorts of other apple treats including pies, muf-fins, doughnuts, rollovers, cookies, cider and more. A long time traditionVictoria Valley Orchard, Aamodt’s Apple Orchard and Pine Tree Apple Orchard are all family-run businesses. For Patrick Krekelberg and his wife, Mary, Pine Tree Apple Orchard has become one of their own family’s favorite fall season traditions. Patrick Krekelberg, who grew up in Shoreview, made regular trips out to Pine Tree as a kid. Now each fall, Patrick Krekelberg and his family make biweekly trips to the orchard from their home in Woodbury to pick up some of their favorite items, including a mouthwatering caramel apple. And what’s their abso-lute favorite kind of apple? “Haralson!” they reply in unison. Early pickings this season If you’re coming out for a freshly packed McIntosh, Cortland, Haralson, or any other of your favorite story by Alex Holmquist • Review staff see Apples on page 2 W photos by Linda Baumeister/Review illustration by Nik VanDenMeerendonk/Review Use of Information Graphics & Graphic Illustrations OPINION • Sunday, July 31, 2011 • 5B St. Cloud Times • www.sctimes.com REPRESENTATIVES SENATORS MINNESOTA GOVERNOR MARK DAYTON DFL 651-201-3400 and 800-657-3717 TDD: 651-201-3460 Fax: 651-797-1850 mark.dayton@state.mn.us O∞ce of the Governor 130 State Capitol Paynesville Roscoe Eden Valley Kimball Clear Lake Becker Big Lake Foley Gilman Milaca Foreston Waite Park St. Joseph Sartell Sauk Rapids Rice St. Stephen Royalton Buckman PierzLittle Falls Harding Randall Albany FreeportMelrose Spring Hill Belgrade Brooten Sedan Starbuck Deerwood 15A 15B 14A 16A 16B 12B 13A 14B Cold Spring 10 10 94 94 Farwell Staples Hewitt Bertha Eagle Bend Clarissa Browerville Long Prairie Burtrum Grey Eagle Miltona Carlos Nelson Osakis West Union Sunburg Annandale Kingston Dassel Grove City Darwin Cokato Cosmos Monticello Maple Lake Bu≠a lo Waverly Lastrup Hillman Onamia Wahkon Fort Ripley Garrison 11B 18B 19A St. Cloud Litchfield 0 5 MilesN MARY KIFFMEYER Republican 651-296-4237 rep.mary.ki≠meyer @house.mn Room 501, State O∞ce Bldg. TIM O’DRISCOLL Republican 651-296-7808 rep.tim.odrischoll@house.mn Room 369, State O∞ce Bldg. BRUCE ANDERSON Republican 651-296-5063 rep.bruce.anderson@house.mn Room 365, State O∞ce Bldg. STEVE GOTTWALT Republican 651-296-6316 800-683-0886 rep.steve.gottwalt @house.mn Room 485, State O∞ce Bldg. KING BANAIAN Republican 651-296-6612 rep.king.banaian@house.mn Room 411, State O∞ce Bldg. PAUL ANDERSON Republican 651-296-4317 rep.paul.anderson @house.mn Room 445, State O∞ce Bldg. MARY FRANSON Republican 651-296-3201 rep.mary.franson @house.mn Room 429, State O∞ce Bldg. DEAN URDAHL Republican 651-296-4344 800-920-5861 rep.dean.urdahl@house.mn Room 571 State O∞ce Bldg. DISTRICT 14 MICHELLE FISCHBACH Republican 651-296-2084 sen.michelle.fischbach @senate.mn Room 226, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 19 AMY KOCH Republican 651-296-5981 sen.amy.koch@ senate.mn Room 208, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 13 JOE GIMSE Republican 651-296-3826 sen.joe.gimse @senate.mn Room 303, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 18 SCOTT NEWMAN Republican 651-296-4131 sen.scott.newman @senate.mn Room 301, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 12 PAUL GAZELKA Republican 651-296-4875 sen.paul.gazelka @senate.mn Room 325, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 11 BILL INGEBRIGTSEN Republican 651-297-8063 sen.bill.ingebrigtsen @senate.mn Room 303, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 16 DAVID BROWN Republican 651-296-8075 sen.david.brown @senate.mn Room 205, Capitol Bldg. DISTRICT 15 JOHN PEDERSON Republican 651-296-6455 sen.john.pederson @senate.mn Room G-24, Capitol Bldg. TIMES GRAPHIC BY LISA MU ELLER, LMUELLER@STCLOU DTIMES.COM LARRY HOSCH DFL 651-296-4373 800-947-8264 rep.larry.hosch@house.mn Room 349, State O∞ce Bldg. HOW TO CONTACT YOUR LEGISLA TORS 100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. St. Paul, MN 55155 STATE OFFICE BUILDING 75 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. B lvd. St. Paul, MN 55155 CAPITOLYOUR VOICE YOUR LEGISLATORS SONDRA ERICKSON Republican 651-296-6746 rep.sondra.erickson @house.mn Room 509, State O∞ce Bldg. MIKE LEMIEUR Republican 651-296-4247 rep.mike.lemieur@house.mn Room 567, State O∞ce Bldg. N n 17 n n g. r g Lake B g SO Rep 651 rep @h Roo Milaca oreston MIK Rep 651 rep Roo St. Cloud 15A 15B Sauk Rapids 14A 23 15 Roosevelt Rdd. 29 th AvAA e. N 11th St. S 30 th 0t AvAA e. N First St. SFirst 13th St. S S. S PPa rkrk D arkark r ..rr St. Cloud 15A 15B Sauk Rapids 14A 23 15 Roosevelt Rd. 29 th A ve . N 11th St. S 30 th A ve . N First St. S 13th St. S Pa rk Dr. DETAIL OF DISTRICT 15 SPLIT IN ST. CLOUD What is happening in US is what felled Rome and Greece By Jay Esmay St. Cloud I just read Health and Human Services Secretar y Kathleen Sebelius’ let- ter where she described how beneficial health care changes would be for small businesses. It must be noted that Secretary Sebelius was born and then married into politica l families. She has never ha d to make a payroll and has no personal experience of the hardships of running a business, small or large. I do run a small business an d have to make payroll ever y two weeks. Like Secretary Sebelius, I have read the Obamacare legislation, an d can see the future. Unlike Ms. Sebelius, I’m scared. After 2014, the penalty for an employer to not pro - vide health care is $2,000 per employee, per year, and there is no penalty for the first 30 employ- ees. Today, a company with 30 employees spends hundreds of thousands of dollars a year on health care. Tomorrow they coul d spend zero. The future is obvious. Companies will drop health care coverage and have their employees move to government heal th care. Since the governme nt is running it, the cost will increase and the quality will decrease. An overrid- ing truth about Obamacar e is it will provide equal car e by punishing people who wake up and go to work every day. We will be equ al though — equally miser- able. Many Americans were against Obamacare when it became law. The law itsel f is a horrible piece of misf it proposals lumped togethe r and shoved up our noses i n a most vile and revolting manner. This administra- tion showed it has utter contempt for the average American. But the greate st damage was done to the American psyche. The emotional toll stopped what appeared to be a normal post-recessio n recovery. Between Janu- ary 2009 and April 2010, we were losing jobs, but improving at an average increase of 67,400 jobs per month. Beginning the month after Obamacare was passed, the recovery flat-lined and has since av - eraged only an increase o f 6,400 jobs per month. This does not mean that Obam- acare is solely responsible , but that it is one brick in the anti-jobs wall. Steve Wynn, casino mogul and staunch Democrat, called this administration, “ ... the greatest wet blanket to business, and progress and job creation in my life - time.” Business leaders have the cash to expand, but are uncertain about the future. Instead of trying to calm those fears, Presi- dent Barack Obama enact s executive orders against businesses, further desta- bilizing the economy. Why would Joe, the plumbing company owner, gamble and hire more employees and expand his business only to be taxed signifi- cantly more, as the presi- dent, our governor and most of the Democrats want? We had a greater un- employment spike under President Ronald Reagan than in this current reces- sion. President Reagan surrounded himself with pilots who had personal experience and understoo d how businesses work. President Obama has sur- rounded himself with en- gineers. They can tell you what each nut and bolt is for and why the last crash occurred, but their perfor - mance shows they have n o clue about what makes an economy tick. As the current debt negotiations prove , this administration is more fo- cused on getting reelected than actually fixing any real problems. This path was prom- ised by President Obama in 2008 as “fundamental change,” but the reality is that it’s nothing new. This is exactly what hap- pened to Rome and Greec e centuries ago. Fewer and fewer citizens produce wealth and governments hold power by demonizing and placing blame on a m i- nority. The sad, historical trend is that the country will eventually collapse upon itself. But, I have unabashed faith in the American people. I believe we will reverse this decline and choose not to be selfish, narcissistic parasites rely - ing on the government for our sustenance. I believe we will again choose to be proud citizens of a great country. This is the opinion of Jay Esmay, an Air Force Academy gr aduate who was an Air Force pilo t for 14 years. The St. Cloud re sident is president of a manufac turing company, a father of four and a lucky husband for more th an 25 years. Obama, his policies are drivi ng country into the ground YOUR TURN An ove rriding truth about Obamacare is it will provide equal care by punishing people who wake up and go to work every day. We will be equal though — equally miserable.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 49  All Weeklies–12 entries First Place: Northfield News From prayer in public meetings to funding nonprofits, a nice selec- tion of community-minded editorials. Second Place: Hutchinson Leader Crisp editorial writing with a strong sense of where this commu- nity should be heading. Leadership at its best. All Dailies-14 entries First Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester Terrific writing on these pages, but what really stands out is how The Post-Bulletin works to act as its community’s conscience. It’s easy to preach on the editorial page, and a lot harder to convey a tone of interested and earnest concern. The fireworks and charity piece is a particularly effective example. Second Place: Duluth News Tribune A strong, engaging voice, no-nonsense opinions, and a heavy em- phasis on local issues—plus a nice show of reporting chops on the editorial page. Well done, Chuck Frederick. All Weeklies–28 entries First Place: Woodbury / South Maplewood Review, Nik VanDenMeerendonk Awesome design, use of graphics, color and overall appeal. Really pops off the page. This was a very tough category, so this newspaper should be proud. Second Place: Echo Press, Alexandria, Karla Mikkelson The competition here was tremendous, but this entry slipped ahead of several others because of its excellent use of graphics and color. Very eye-catching. All Dailies–9 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Erin Crommett Great example for others to follow on how to create a clean page. Nice work. Second Place: Owatonna People’s Press, Jason Schmucker This category had some great entries. Jason’s work really stood out to me because of the clean designs. Eye-catching work. Honorable Mention: Marshall Independent, Aaron Schlemmer Great designs. Clean work. Editorial Portfolio Today’s results: Next Question: Do you think Rice County s hould approve the turbine projects propo sed for Northfield Township? Votes can be cast at www.no rthfieldnews.com. Poll results do not represent a scientific survey. N Online Poll www.northfieldnews.com Northfield News Vol. 134; Issue No. 96 GENERAL INFORMATION The Northfield News is p ublished twice-weekly, on Wednesd ay and Saturday. Business hours ar e 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through F riday. Phone: 645-5615 Fax: 645-6005 Mail: 115 W. Fifth St. Northfield, MN 55057 -2017 Web Site: www.northfieldne ws.com — USPS ISSN 3541-R — Published by Huckle Media L LC Postmaster: Send address changes to Northfield News, 115 W. Fifth St., Northfield MN 55057. Periodical postage paid a t North- field, Minn. CONTACT US News, editorial desk: 645-11 13 Sports: 645-1111 Circulation: 645-1107 Display Advertising: 645-111 2 Classified Advertising: 645-1 108 Classifieds may be placed fro m 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. by phone Monday through Friday. Deadline is noon two days be- fore publication. Publisher and Editor Sam Gett — 645-1112 sgett@northfieldnews.com Managing Editor Jaci Smith — 645-1116 jsmith@northfieldnews.com Associate Editor Suzanne Rook — 645-1113 srook@northfieldnews.com SUBSCRIPTION RATES In Rice and adjoining counties, $57.50 for 48 weeks, $30.5 0 for 24 weeks. Elsewhere in Minnes ota, $65 for 48 weeks, $35.50 for 2 4 weeks. Elsewhere in the United Sta tes, $74 for 48 weeks, $39 for 24 wee ks. Copyright 2010 Northfield News: The Northfield News retains the pub- lication rights to all conte nts pro- duced or supplied to the N ews. Use of said materials without th e written consent of the Northfield News is prohibited. Contents copyrig hted; all rights reserved. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Northfield News invites readers to submit letters expressing an opin- ion on a topic of local inte rest. Full name, address and phone number are required for verification purpos- es. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Ano nymous letters and those without v erifiable names and addresses will not be published. Letters will be p ublished at the discretion of the New s and in the order in which they are verified, with consideration given to authors who have not been publishe d within the past 30 days. Letters sh ould be no more than 400 words in length. The author will be notifie d before publication if the submitte d letter needs to be edited for len gth pur- poses. The Northfield News reserves the right to edit all submissi ons. NEWS SUBMISSIONS The Northfield News invites readers to submit news items of lo cal inter- est. Submissions should be directed to the attention of the m anaging editor and either mailed, e -mailed, faxed or hand-delivered to t he News office. Please include the n ame, ad- dress and telephone numb er of the person submitting the ne ws item. News items will be publish ed in a timely fashion at the discreti on of the Northfield News, which also reserves the right to edit submissions . How do you feel about the recommenda- tions Northfield is sending Rice County on two proposed wind turbine projects? I smell something fishy. .. .................... 49.2% Logic and planning princip les have been properly applied. ................................. ..................................20% How can they favor one pr oject and not the other? .................................... .............................. 15.4% No opinion ........................... .............................. 15.4% Total voters: 65 Statistics don’t lie. And the statistics say that u nless the state is interested in making charter schools a thing of the past in the state of Minnesota, something has to be done about its new law . Last year, new regulations developed by the state De- partment of Education in c onjunction with the Nation al Association of Charter Sch ool Authorizers changed t he responsibilities of what wa s formerly known as char ter school “sponsors.” Now called “authorizers,” t hese entities, many of which were public schools, colleges and unive rsities, are now expected to be resp onsible for the schools that in the pa st they had merely supported. As result, they must file an application that numbers in the hundreds of pages. They mu st cre- ate spreadsheets of respon sibility matrices to show how overs ight of the charter school will be ha ndled. They must determine how they’ll oversee the charter’s financ es and human resource functions . Their board basically becomes th e char- ter’s de facto board. It seems, with the new regul ation, that the state Depart- ment of Education has abdi cated its oversight responsi bil- ity of these particular scho ols and passed the buck on to the authorizers. Some orga nizations recognized this ea rly on and didn’t even bother to apply, leaving the char ter schools they had supported in the past in danger of hav ing to close. Fewer charter schools mean s fewer educational choices for the families of Minneso ta. That may not be what t he state DOE intended, but th at certainly could be its un in- tended consequence unless the law is changed soon. The state Depart- ment of Education is charged with providing top qual- ity education for our families and holding its schools responsible for the same. It should not have pushed that responsibility down to the organizations ap- plying as authorizers of charter schools. Our View New regulations hurt charter schools and Minnesota education Northfield News editorial s are the opinions of the ed itorial board, which consists of P ublisher/Editor Sam Gett , Manag- ing Editor Jaci Smith and Associate Editor Suzanne Rook. PAGE 4A WWW.NoRTHFIELDNEWS.C oM SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEM BER 11-12, 2010OPINION Larry Turne r will tell you he doesn't like talking ab out his time in the service: The difficult days, the conf licts, the roomful of honors he doesn 't discuss publicly. But if you pay attention, as Turner talks in vague terms about his Navy days, you'll notice the cat ch in his voice, the stiffening of his shoulders and the slight dampness in his eyes. What Turner doesn't verb alize says everything about why he ha s worked so diligently to ensure there's a memorial dedicated to N orthfield area veterans. The memorial, which face s onto Hwy. 3, sits just north of Ninth Street in Riverside Lions Park. It's a project that Turner and a group of dedicated vets took seven years to make a reality. Five years ago last month, the memorial was unveiled. Every cent of the $650, 000 cost was donated. Northfield's VFW and American Legion posts d onated at least $50,000 apiece. So me came from area companies and residents who, like Turner, believe in honoring America's servicemen an d women who fought and died for ca uses they didn't always believe in. Some of the money raised came from the sale of 1,200 gran ite pavers that surround the memo rial. The pavers, inscribed with th e names of locals who served their country, commemorate their military service. That, said Turner, was imp ortant to memorial planners who felt that service, not rank and military honors, should be recogniz ed. "All we care about is that y ou put the uniform on and got an h onorable discharge," he said. Members from every branch of service, including the National Guard, can be recognize d at the memorial. Pavers can still b e ordered and installed. A portion of the money helps defray costs to main tain the memorial, and one day , Turner hopes, improve the site. In recent years, memorial committ ee - Milt Berg, Will Brosz, Al Gree nlee, Ken Grisim, Paul McGuire, Ra y Ozmun, Orville Schmidt and Turn er - have bought a parcel adjacen t to the original memorial site. T wo other parcels have been donated by local developer Eugene Jasnoch. Some day, the committee h opes to get the city's help in adding dedicated parking space for visitors. Every now and then, Turne r says, he runs into someone w ho hasn't yet visited the memorial. To each, he suggests a trip to soak it all in, something he likes to do. Each time, he says, he comes away refreshed and app reciative. But it isn't just the service men who need evidence of their coun trymen's appreciation, it's the public , he said, who need to be reminde d of the gift the thousands and t housands of soldiers, sailors, Mar ines and guardsmen have given this nation. "Somebody needs to say , 'Hey, we appreciate your servic e to this country,'" he said. I think you did, Larry . And thanks. —Reach Suzanne Rook at 645- 1113. GET INVOLVED Granite pavers for placeme nt around the Northfield Area Vetera ns Memorial are available for $300. Th e cost is tax deductible. For more information about purchasing pa vers, visit northfieldveterans.org or w rite to NAVM, P.o. Box 822, Northfield MN 55057. 8 Writer’s Block Suzanne Rook Associate Editor Thanks, you guys - and gals Ready for an other ride on the New Year's res- olution rollercoaster? Thousands of Northfielders will soon mark the New Year with declarations of stark lifestyle changes and abrupt fresh starts to a better way of living. This is your op- portunity to turn over a new leaf! You've been waiting all year to make changes and begin new! Ridiculous. New Year's Resolutions drive me crazy. Waiting all year for Jan. 1 to declare changes supported by guilt (because that's what you do on Jan. 1) is a tradition I'm ready to change. The chances are good you know right now what changes you'd like in your life. Why wait? Begin now. Consider all your years of resolution making. Have you been successful? Of adults, 50 percent make resolutions and 50 percent of that group fails at those resolutions within three months. Listen to health experts (everyone from physicians to psychologists). Break your goals into smaller steps and start now. Celebrate your small successful steps and forgive yourself for the little setbacks but keep moving forward. Tell your friends, track your behavior and make a plan — just a little plan for healthy changes. Before you know it it'll be Jan. 1 and you can smile ear-to-ear because you've made steps that you can be really proud of and you've probably spent more time with family, enjoyed your holiday eating, felt and looked healthier and actu- ally visited fast food restau- rants less often. What are the most com- mon New Year's resolu- tions? 1) Get more exercise 2) Eat healthier 3) Lose weight 4) Quit smoking 5) Enjoy life more 6) Spend more time with family 7) Drink less 8) Volunteer 9) Manage debt 10) Go back to school Simple strategies to suc- cessful lifestyle changes (which most of these are): •Have a strong initial commitment to make a change •Have coping strategies to deal with problems that come up (and they will) •Make a plan •Keep track of your prog- ress •Reward yourself and •Tell someone Just because you join an organization with a fit- ness center, doesn't mean you'll go. Imagining all the healthier home meals you'll cook, doesn't mean the gro- ceries will magically appear in your cupboard. Carefully look at your week. When is your child's basketball game? When do you have time for a walk with your significant other (bundle up — you're in Min- nesota — plan for warm clothes too)? Use the world's best recipe source (the web) and add ingredients to your weekly shopping list. Block time every week for one more small step to success. Whatever you do, don't give up and don't wait for Jan. 1. Start now. — Virginia Kaczmarek is the executive director of the Northfield Area Fami ly YMCA. 8 Another View Virginia Kaczmarek Guest Columnist A new approach to resolutio ns 8 letters to the editor Water billing system in Dundas ridiculous To the Editor: We have called Dundas our home now for a year and a half and have a real concern we would like to see brought to light. I'm not sure if you've been informed of the outrageous water bills that are consuming city residents. Currently for our household, a family of three with a washing machine, we pay $50 for water use alone. That is a night-and-day difference from what we paid in Northfield for nine months prior to moving to Dundas. The city of Dundas charges all its residents the same base rate, one flat fee for water use. If you go over that amount you're charged an extra dollar amount per gallon; if you use less than that “lump sum” of water, good for you! This is ridicu- lous! When the city got a quote for its new water tower and treatment facility, tax payers were told that they wouldn't see the bill from it, especially in water bills. Well, that isn't the case! This type of billing for water use breeds waste. Throughout Dundas if you ask residents about their water consump- tion its a touchy subject. A lot of people talk about how they never come close to us- See LETTERS, 5A A4 ✩ • • • • • • • • Opinions Member of the Small Newspaper Group, Kankakee, Ill. • Len Robert Small, President & CEO • Thomas P. Small, Senior Vice President • Cordell J. Overgaard, Vice President • Robert L. Hill, Vice President Post-Bulletin Company LLC Randy Chapman, Publisher, 285-7602Greg Sellnow, Editorial Page Editor, 285-7703Eric Atherton, Editorial Page Writer, 285-7709 Monday Our editorial board predicts that the Legislature will consider plenty of constitutional amendments. PAGE A7 SATURDAYDECEMBER 11, 2010 The Post-Bulletin invites your contributions to this page. Here’s how: Letters to the editor: Letters should be 225 words or fewer and include the name, hometown and daytime phone number of the writer. We verify all letters. Anonymous letters will not be published. We publish as many letters as possible, though we generally don’t publish more than one per writer in a 30-day period. Letters can be sent to Editorial Page, Post-Bulletin, 18 First Ave. S.E., Rochester, MN 55901. You also can send e-mail to: letters@postbulletin.com. (No attachments please.) We strongly encourage letter writers to submit photos of themselves for use with their letters. No more than two writers may claim authorship of a single letter to the editor. Guest columns: We also welcome longer submissions on issues we believe are of interest to our readers. These guest columns appear on the Opinions and Commentary pages, at our discretion. Length will generally be limited to 800 words. All letters and commentary pieces become the property of the Post-Bulletin, which reserves the right to edit material for clarity, grammar and newspaper style. LETTERS INVITED By Mark Thein The Post-Bulletin will soon be looking for seven or eight new area residents to fill a year’s term on their Editorial Advisory Board. As one of the outgoing members, I feel obligated to give you a heads-up about what is involved. The first rule of Editorial Advisory Board is, you do not talk about ... ... .never mind, that’s Fight Club. Sorry. The first step in having a successful term on the board is to actually get selected. Southeast Minnesota has no shortage of intelligent people with strong opinions and an ability to express them in writing. You’re going to have just a short paragraph to explain to the editors why they should choose you. One thing you have going for you is that they’re looking for diversity in background, education, career, location, perspective, race, sex, etc. So you only have to convince them that you’re the best of the those who fit your demographic. If you’re lucky enough to get selected, you’ll get an email and an invitation to a meeting at the Post-Bulletin. You’ll get your picture taken by a real Post-Bulletin photographer, get to meet the brain-trust behind the paper, get a free Coke and a couple of slices of pizza. You’ll then sit at a table and wonder why they chose you. You’ll see six or seven other newbies — and they’re all a LOT more interesting than you and likely much better writers too. As you get to know each other, you’ll find that you have very little in common with most of them but, amazingly, you’ll soon consider them to be friends. As you leave the meeting and go home, you can hardly wait to write that first piece. Hours turn into days, days into weeks and you likely still haven’t contrib-uted your first piece. As your co-board-members’ pieces hit print, you start to question whether you can compete. Thoughts are swirling in your head and you soon spend nearly all your idle time mentally putting words into sentences and sentences into paragraphs — trying to determine if you even have the ability to write an 800-word opinion piece that won’t either cause the community to riot or, even worse, quit reading halfway through due to boredom. You force yourself to try it and after an hour, you’ve got a 500-word “tweener”— too long for the 250-word Two Cents Worth piece but far too short for a true column. You read it carefully and find that it sounds too much like something you recently heard from a co-worker, local radio personality or, worse yet, partisan national TV “news” hack. You hit “delete” and start over — two hours later you have a completely differ-ent “masterpiece.” You read it three times to make sure that it makes sense, spell-check it one more time just to be sure and then hit the “send” key. You then read it a fourth time and wish you had phrased it differently — too late now. You wait and wait — usually it only takes a few hours before Editorial Page Editor Greg Sellnow gets back to you — it just seems like days. Inevitably, Greg will tell you “good job” and let you know that he’ll try to get it in print “soon.” You then start thinking about what you just did and you get nervous. “What are people going to think?” — of you, of your writing ability, of what you so strongly believe in that you’re asking them to spend 10 minutes to read it? Like an expectant father pacing the hallways, every day you check the Post-Bulletin’s website to see if today is “judgment day” — finally, after months (in reality, a few days) you see a new editorial piece show up online that appears to be about the same thing you wrote about. You click the title (usually not quite what you would have picked) and find out that it’s yours. Your heart races as you read it again online and you still find a few things you wish you would have changed. Pretty soon, you get an email from some-body you used to know — telling you that they liked your piece. You later get a sideways glance from a few coworkers and interpret that to mean that they didn’t care too much for it. You check back online a few hours later and find out that some commenters think you’re a genius and some think you could not be more misguided. You feel relieved that they at least stayed awake to read it all the way through and start to think about your next piece. On the way home, you pick up an extra copy of the Post-Bulletin — maybe your grandkids will want to read it someday. A few nights later, at some social event, somebody will break an awkward silence by wanting to discuss what you wrote. You feel proud. Such is the life of an Editorial Advi-sory Board Member. For six cans of Coke, 12 slices of pizza and a little attention, you spend countless hours staring at a computer screen and take years off of your life worrying about how your opinions will be received. It’s truly one of the best non-paying jobs a person could have. I hope to continue to occasionally contribute my takes, but I really look forward to reading your thoughts on what’s going on. I encourage you to give it a try. Good luck! Mark Thein of Oronoco is finishing his one-year stint as a member of the Post-Bulletin’s edito-rial board. And if he ever was truly afraid of what people might think or say about the ideas he expressed in the Post-Bulletin, he did an awfully good job hiding it. Two years ago, we created what we refer to as the Post-Bulletin Editorial Advisory Board. It’s a panel of readers from diverse backgrounds who offer advice and sugges-tions on editorial page matters. Panel-ists also write frequent guest columns or shorter “Two-Cents Worth” comments for publication on our Opinions Page.Our seven-member advisory board meets with the P-B’s Editorial Board at least every other month and we maintain frequent e-mail contact with the group. (Current members are Leah Nelson, Ray Schmitz, Christine Beech, Muhammad Babur, Mark Thein, John Sherwin and Horace Bryant.) We’re sometimes asked if the advisory panel members are employed by the P-B. They aren’t. The views expressed by members of the group are their own and often conflict with the opinions of our editorial board. We think that’s a good thing. We pay advisory board members nothing but gratitude and pizza or sand-wiches during our meetings, which are generally held on weekday evenings.The seven current board members will complete their one-year stints on the board at the end of January. So, we’re looking for P-B readers who are interested in serving on our 2011 advisory board.We’d like this group to be as diverse as possible, so please submit some brief biographical information that includes your age, occupation, interests and why you think you’d be a good fit for this task. We’re also looking for people who have a strong interest in writing for publication and don’t mind having their names and photos in the paper. Access to e-mail is essential. We’ll name the new panel by Feb. 1. If you’d like to be considered, send an e-mail to Editorial Page Editor Greg Sell-now at sellnow@postbulletin.com by Dec. 31. High stress, no pay — and you’ll love every minute Have something to say? Join our Editorial Advisory Board Thein “I am a library lover, but I believe public libraries should solicit philanthropic support rather than expecting the taxpayer to pony up. I grew up in a small town where the library didn’t use a dime of taxpayer money. The library was funded through an endowment from a wealthy town person (and still is to this day).” -------------- “Before spending more money on the library, I would like facts and figures on how many people use it and how much is being spent for the different items (utilities, staff, etc.) Not that it might not be a good use of sales tax dollars, but is there some waste or dead weight that could be eliminated first.” -------------- “I’m an old-school library lover and get up there several times a month. I am not happy that so many in our community just see it as a place to hang out; however, I agree with the letter writer, the library is a community treasure and ought to be better funded than some of the examples he cited.” -------------- “On many matters on which Mr. Hawthorne has posted I would tend to disagree (as many posters do). On this one I would be in full agreement. There are valid reasons why the library might not be in the top five, but in the top five I think at least four were not worthy of even being considered. Several proposals are too nebulous, as well as being better suited for private finance. It would be great if someone (i.e. Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, etc.) could support all libraries, but that is not the real world... This is a PUBLIC library, and should be supported by the PUBLIC. It benefits ALL of the public — preschool, poor, rich, senior citizen and all in between.” -------------- “The sales tax extension should have been discontinued once the flood mitigation projects for which it was enacted were complete. What we have now is more and more projects lining up for ‘free’ money from the government. Enough.”-------------- “If the library is too full, re-purpose the all-purpose rooms into core library functions. That should open things up a bit. And might I suggest an audit of checkouts that results in disposal of books not touched for 10 years.” -------------- “I agree that anybody asking for public money needs to show financial responsibility (and even frugality these days), but I would be very concerned about a library that would either be financed privately or only available to those who can pay for the services provided. A well-run, free-to-use library is an invaluable tool for anybody seeking information.”-------------- “It should be noted that the Library DOES dispose of items which are not being checked out — or in the case of nonfiction are outdated. These are sold (yes cheaply) to help pay for newer books. Book donations to the library are added to the stock on a regular basis (saving costs) to the tune of several thousand per year. Donated books not needed are also sold, again for new books and to help support programs. But they cannot support the whole program — let alone a building project.”-------------- “First of all, the library’s main focus is dying. Checking out books will be something grandparents will soon fondly recall to their grandchildren while talking about the good old days. The next generation will be reading online, on their Kindles, smart phones and whatever else (is invented.) I enjoy the library, but the only crowds I see there are around the free Internet and videos, which are not library functions in my view.” -------------- “If we are serious about cost reductions, I have to say the library would be at or near the top of my list. If it could be funded by patrons or user fees, great, but I do not think that is likely. If it comes down to police, firemen, or library I think the choice is pretty clear.” -------------- “Whether or not the public library system is at risk of becoming defunct with new technologies or not is a matter worthy of debate. But no answer can be expected until we actually experience the future. After all, it was said that movies would end books. That the telephone would end social interaction altogether. That television would end social interaction altogether. And now they say that the Internet will end social interaction altogether. We will see.”-------------- “I disagree with the notion that the library will soon be obsolete. Not everybody has the means to ‘be reading online, on their Kindles, smart phones...’ Especially as the economy slows down, more people turn to a place where they can get their information and knowledge at no cost. If we discontinue providing information and knowledge to those who can’t afford to pay for it, we will open the door to all kinds of problems.” Should library be a higher priority? Post-Bulletin file photo Each week we select a news story, Letter to the Editor, column or editorial that’s generated a lot of feedback at Postbulletin.com and reprint some of those comments on this page. This week’s topic is a Letter to the Editor by Frank Hawthorne, a Rochester resident and employee at the Rochester Public Library, who believes a proposed expansion of the library should be a high priority when decisions are made about an extension of the local-option sales tax. He wrote: “Not only was our request for an $18 million expansion of the current, 15-year-old-and- full-to-capacity structure dismissed, but in the long list of ranked proposals, we came in a distant 24th.” Below are some of the comments we received. Backtalk How often do you visit a public library? Vote online at Postbulletin.com Design Portfolio Volume 30, Number 39 Monday, Sept. 27, 2010 W SM A Lillie Suburban Newspa per www.lillienews.com Woodbury•South Maplew ood Serving Woodbury an d South Maplewood VTEst.1968 3001 Hwy. 61 N., Maplewood • (South of I-694) • www.venburgtire.co m THE VENBURG EXTRAS • mounting • balancing • valve system • environmental charges • rotation 651.483.2601 • Shocks • Struts • Brakes • Alignments • Exhaust • Bat teries WE ARE OPEN: M-F 7AM-6PM, SAT. 8AM-2P M Venburg Tire 41FAMILY OWN ED & OP ER AT ED FO R OV ER Emergency Home & Auto Open-Ups Commercial Residential Quality Keys Made 651-730-7524 • 651-226-8189 Steve Montgomeryg y Oakdale Locksmiths Lamp Repair For FREE Inspection Call 651-777-2913 WaterHeaters Made In The USA By Bradford White $720.00 Parts + Labor Installed High Recovery PRIMEAU’S TREE SERVICE Certifi ed Arborist FREE Estimates 38 Years Experience Family Owned 651-773-5643 • Advertising campaigns • Business cards • Letterhead • Envelopes • Postcards • Carbonless contracts • Posters • Banners • Newsletters • Mailing & bindery • Raffl e tickets • Brochures • Newspapers • And much more! CALL HOLLY 651-748-7863 CALL PAUL 651-748-7862 WE HAVE BEEN GROWING LOCAL BUSINESSES FOR OVER 73 YEARS aving goodbye to summer in Min- nesota is always tough, but many of us reve l in the short but sweet fa ll season. We love to marvel at the red, orange and golden hue s of the falling leaves, an d the crisp air often feels lik e paradise after a hot, steam y summer. And just because leaves and temperatures are drop - ping doesn’t mean w e should all begin hibernatin g for the winter. There’s sti ll plenty of time to head ou t to one of Minnesota’s man y apple orchards for a guaran - teed good time. Orchards galore Apple lovers in the Twin Cities have a wide selectio n of orchards from which t o choose. Victoria Valley Orchard in Shoreview, Aamodt’s Appl e Orchard in Grant and Pin e Tree Apple Orchard i n White Bear Lake are a few popular spots in the area. At V i c t o r i a Va l l ey Orchard, customers wi ll receive lots of persona l attention since it’s on th e smaller side, says owne r Molly Papenheim. The orchard’s small size also means it’s able to refrig - erate its apples, a definit e plus when looking for high - quality fruit. Though the apples at Vic- toria Valley Orchard are a ll pre-picked, those hoping t o pick their own apples ca n head to Aamodt’s Appl e Orchard. Since locall y grown apples ripened earl y this year, the pick-your - own season will be endin g shortly. Aamodt’s is also unique in that it is the only appl e orchard in Minnesota wit h a vineyard on site. And if you’re looking for an action-packed day, tr y out a few of the many fam - ily-friendly activities thes e orchards have to offer. At Aamodt’s, you can hop on a hayride, pet some farm animals or explore the ha y bale maze. Kids can hea d to John Deere Kiddie Trik e and Tractor Farm for $1. At Pine Tree Apple Orchard, visitors can watc h the apple sorting proces s, enjoy musical entertain - ment, take a ride on a wago n or pony, meander through a corn maze and take a trip t o the pumpkin patch as Ha l- loween approaches. Also, check out Pine Tree Apple Orchard’s bak - ery where you’ll find bag s of freshly packed apple s and all sorts of other appl e treats including pies, mu f- fins, doughnuts, rollover s, cookies, cider and more. A long time tradition Victoria Valley Orchard, Aamodt’s Apple Orchar d and Pine Tree Appl e Orchard are all family-ru n businesses. For Patrick Krekelberg and his wife, Mary, Pin e Tree Apple Orchard ha s become one of their ow n family’s favorite fall seaso n traditions. Patrick Krekelberg, who grew up in Shoreview, mad e regular trips out to Pin e Tree as a kid. Now each fall, Patrick Krekelberg and his famil y make biweekly trips to th e orchard from their hom e in Woodbury to pick u p some of their favorite item s, including a mouthwaterin g caramel apple. And what’s their abso- lute favorite kind of apple ? “Haralson!” they reply i n unison. Early pickings this season If you’re coming out for a freshly packed McIntosh , Cortland, Haralson, o r any other of your favorit e story by Alex Holmquist • R eview staff see Apples on page 2 W photos by Linda Baumeiste r/Review illustration by Nik VanDenM eerendonk/Review By J. Shane Mercersmercer@forumcomm.com Fred B. Scheel was tough.He was physically fit and “tough mentally,”says Mark Strand, a friend of Scheel and thechairman of mass communication atMinnesota State University Moorhead. To wit, Scheel flew a fighter plane for the UnitedStates Marine Corps in World War II. “He always wore that Marine ring,” Strand says of the symbolof earned manliness.Yet the photographs the area businessman took and that arenow on display at the Plains Art Museum move past Scheel’stough reputation to reveal an eye sensitive to form, light andcomposition and a mind appreciative of the tender beauty of asunflower or a young child. “The Frederick B. Scheel Photography Collection: A New Giftto the Plains” runs through Aug. 12, 2011, at the Plains ArtMuseum in Fargo. It features a selection from the 266 photosgiven to the Plains by Fred Scheel and his family. Many of thoseimages were made by Scheel, an accomplished photographer inhis own right.Others were taken by some of the great names in the world of20th-century photography: Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, BrettWeston, Ruth Bernhard, André Kertész and Mary Ellen Mark. www.schmittmusic.com © 2010 Schmitt Music Co. Joining The Band or Orchestra? • Great selection of new and used vertical pianos • YAMAHA digitalpianos starting at $799 • New and used grand pianos as low as $4,999• HOME OF STEINWAY & SONS, Boston, Essex, Kawai and LyricaPianos; Yamaha & Kawai digital pianos • Piano lessons • Family owned & operated • NEW! Get your instrument online at www.schmittmusic.com/tp • Top Starter Program GUARANTEED! • Quality Educator-Approved Instruments • Great Selection of major brands • Low Monthly Payments • Unlimited Return Option • Worry-Free Optional Maintenance Plan • One-Stop Shopping for all your instrument, accessory and musical needs • Great Lesson Programs • Weekly Service to Your School • Top Repair Shop! 4101 13th Ave. S.W.701-281-1828 YOUR PIANO AND KEYBOARD HEADQUARTERS! Schmitt Music’s flexible, affordable, risk-free Trial PurchasePlan…helping over 10,000 families start school music eachyear! New or Used...it’s easy - we’re here to help you! Celebrity birthdays Actor Fred Willard is 71. Singer-actor FrankieAvalon is 71. Guitarist Kerry Livgren (Kansas) is 61.Actor James Gandolfini is 49. Actress HollyRobinson Peete is 46. Singer Ricky Bell (Bell BivDevoe, New Edition) is 43. Actress Jada PinkettSmith is 39. Actor James Marsden is 37. ActorTravis Schuldt (“Scrubs) is 36. Rapper Xzibit is 36. LIFE Saturday, September 18, 2010 The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Section B {home, garden & leisure} Tough guy’s photosreveal a softer side Photos special to The Forum Among the pieces in the gift from the Frederick B. Scheel family is “Star Shell,” a 1943 photo by esteemed German-born photographer Ruth Bernhard. Frederick B. Scheel’s “Sunflower, North Dakota” is a 1991 photograph. view Scheel’s Frederick B. Scheel is shown in the photograph below. If you go � What: Reception for thephotography exhibit “TheFrederick B. ScheelPhotography Collection: ANew Gift to the Plains,”including a tribute toScheel by MuseumDirector Colleen Sheehyand Christian Petersonfrom the MinneapolisInstitute of Art. The exhibitis on display through Aug.12, 2011. � When: 5:30 to 7:30p.m. Thursday. � Where: The Plains Art Museum, Fargo� Info: Free for museummembers, $10 fornonmembers. (701) 232-3821. SCHEEL: Page B3 ‘Borat’ to play Queen frontman in biopic“Borat” actor Sacha Baron Cohen (pictured left) has beensigned up to star in a movie about flamboyant rock star FreddieMercury (pictured right). Producers say Peter Morgan, whowrote “The Queen,” is working on a screenplay about thefrontman of the band Queen, who died of AIDS in 1994. Queenguitarist Brian May says the band supports the project.Production is due to begin next year.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 50 All Weeklies–8 entries First Place: Waseca County News, Jordan Osterman Outstanding writer as evidenced by the pieces in this package. Sur- prising perspective for someone who is a new journalist. Bright, bright future ahead for this young person. Second Place: Robbinsdale / Crystal / New Hope / Golden Valley Sun Post, Anna Woodwick Excellent storyteller to be such a young journalist. The fact she also doubles as a page designer/copy editor makes her performance that much more impressive. All Dailies–10 entries First Place: Faribault Daily News, Joseph Lindberg Outstanding work by a young journalist. In a category chock full of great nominees, Joseph’s work stood above the rest. Second Place: Owatonna People’s Press, Ashley Peterson Ashley has a bright, bright future as a journalist if she continues to do this type of work. Again, she was part of a category full of incredible nominees. Weeklies up to 2,500–32 entries First Place: Wabasso Standard Kids Chronicle A great idea executed well. I imagine this would be a great revenue generator on the ad side. Who would turn down the chance to have an ad designed by a kid? While parents, grandparents and the kids themselves would also want copies of the supplement. The special section was put together well, and I enjoyed looking at all the ads (and reading the classifieds - they gave me a great laugh). This is a great example of becoming part of the community you serve. Well done. Second Place: Portage News, Floodwood Central St. Louis County Youth Baseball A great special section on youth baseball. Nice use of color and an eye-catching cover. The copy was well written, and it was a great touch to bold the names of people in each story - makes it easier for Mom and Dad to find Jr. in the paper. Great art. Nice large bold ads with a good tie-in with the section - love the ones that used pictures of the teams. Special Section New Journalist of the Year A1WCN8 WEDNESDAY July 6, 2011 COUNTY NEWS WASECA [|xbIIGDJy00010kzU[|xbIIGDJy00010kzU Vol. 31 No. 28 20 Pages Two Sections ONLINE INSIDE Waseca friends are trying to make a name for themselves on the Min- nesota fishing scene. • B1 Fish tales New Richland gears up for its annual town celebration, Farm and City Days • A3 NR gets ready See wasecacoun- tynews.com for the latest reader comments. What they’re saying How long will it take to come to a state budget agreement? Vote online at wase- cacountynews.com What do you think? NEWS TIP? Contact the newsroom at 507-837-5443 or the sports desk at 507-837- 5447. A casualty of the state government shutdown, the Hwy. 14 project has been put on hold. • A2 Hwy. 14 on hold Newsstand $1.25 www.wasecacountynews. com Serving the communities of Waseca, Janesville and New Richland The Boys of Summer Part 5 in series looks at histor y of Town Team BasballB1 Griffi th’s Gaffe County News/Jordan Oster man The Oct. 2, 1978 edition of the W aseca Daily Journal reacts to c omments Min- nesota Twins owner Calvin Grif fi th made at the previous Thurs day’s Lions Club meeting in Waseca. In late September 1978, Minne apolis Tribune staff writer Nic k Coleman was on hand at the W aseca Lions Club Meeting whe n Minnesota Twins owner Calvin Griffi th made co mments that haunted him the rest of his car eer. Those who were there sha re differing viewpoints on how t he story was handled. By JORDAN OSTERMAN josterman@wasecacountynews. com WASECA — In 1961 Calvin Griffi th, owner o f the Washington Senator s, moved his baseball team to Minnesota and rename d it the Twins. Twenty-thre e years later he sold the team to Carl Pohlad for $36 mi l- lion, ending 65 years of th e Griffi th family owning th e baseball franchise. In those 23 years the Twins reached the Worl d Series in 1965, losing t o the Los Angeles Dodgers i n seven games, and saw man y great players, including ha ll of fame members Harmo n Killebrew and Rod Carew , don its jerseys. Through - out that same time perio d Griffi th cemented his repu - tation as a hard-nosed own - er, tough in contract nego - tiations and known to spea k what was on his mind. In 1978 that latter char- acteristic brought criticism crashing down on top o f him. A dramatic scene un - folded itself in one of th e most unlikely places: Wase - ca. Griffi th accepted an in - vitation to the town that si ts well to the south of the Twi n Cities and the franchis e he owned and spoke on a Thursday evening to th e Waseca Lions Club. The re - sults, as his son would late r say in Griffi th’s biograph y, “just buried him.” Over three decades later, the story still stirs passio n in those who were there t o see things unfold. The re - percussions of the night ’s events were long lastin g and continue to leave the ir mark on the legacies of bot h Griffi th and Waseca. This is the story. Griffi th to Waseca By all accounts Waseca native and sports write r Tony Sybilrud was a bi g Twins fan and had the dis - tinction of being a clos e friend of Griffi th. Both he r- alded storytellers, “Ton y and Calvin were the best o f friends,” Waseca’s Mann y Beckmann said. Sybilrud extended an in- vitation to Griffi th to com e down to play golf and spea k at the Lions Club on Sep - tember 28, three days befor e the Twins fi nal game of th e season on October 1. “To get an owner down to a club in Waseca, th e chances are basically nil ,” said then-president of th e Lions Club Ken Lenz. But Sybilrud and Griffi th were friends, and Beckman n said Sybilrud had a way o f convincing people to com e and visit Waseca. “He wouldn’t have come for anybody but Tony,” Do n Zwach said. Griffi th accepted the invitation and came dow n Thursday. He and Sybi l- rud played golf that afte r- noon and multiple accoun ts said Griffi th was drinkin g throughout the day. Tha t evening the two of them went to the Lions Clu b meeting, where Griffi th at e dinner and talked with clu b members and guests be - fore rising after the meal t o speak. Nick Coleman to the Lions Club Waseca Deputy Sheriff Mert Schwarz had unwil l- ingly stepped into the shoe s of sheriff when Donal d Eustice had been shot an d killed in the line of duty i n 1976. In the fall of 197 8 Schwarz was running fo r the fi rst time to be electe d sheriff and had enlisted h is son-in-law Nick Coleman , who had married his daugh - ter in 1975, for help with h is campaign. Coleman said he had planned to come to Wase - ca September 28 to hel p Schwarz put some campaig n signs together, but when h e called Schwarz he was tol d it was a bad night to wor k on campaign material; ther e was something more impo r- tant going on. “He said Griffi th was coming and said I should g o with and he would buy m e dinner,” Coleman said. A staff writer for the Minneapolis Tribune, Cole - man lived in Rochester an d covered southern Minne - sota. Waseca fell under h is area of coverage, but on tha t night he said he had “no in - tentions of going there t o cover it.” Just the same, he headed to the Lions Club meetin g with Schwarz and sat dow n to dinner. Coleman said plenty of people at the meeting knew him. He had been married t o the deputy sheriff and now sheriff ’s daughter for thre e years and had spent quite a bit of time in the area. See GAFFE on A5 Celebrating in Waseca County News/ Marianne Carlson A fi reworks display over Clear Lake Monday night capped off a weekend full of great times and entertainment. Large crowds were welcomed by great weather for both Chatauqua on Sunday and Lakefest on Monday as Waseca celebrated its hometown. See more on pages A11 and A12 Board denies employee request By RUTH ANN HAGER rhager@wasecacountynew s.com WASECA — A request to add a full time maintenan ce employee to the county wo rk- force was defeated by a 2-3 vote of the Waseca Cou nty Commissioners at their Ju ne 21 meeting. C o u n t y E n g i n e e r Nathan Rich- man said his depar tment has been re- a r r a n g i n g the workload and level of service since 2008 because of various levels of “free zes and thaws.” The current staff includes supervisor Paul Nei- gebauer and 11 employees, down from 13.25 employees in 2008. The average state aid reimbursement per mainte- nance worker is 60 percent, according to the county. Richman recommended hiring one full time main te- nance worker for the cou nty workload, to be posted int er- nally fi rst. Commissioner Richard Androli said the shorta ge came to a head last fall w ith the fl oods when “we could re- ally tell we were down.” He made a motion to ap- prove the recruitment of a maintenance worker. Board Chair Mike Hintz said he had a hard time s up- porting the hire because o f a possible state shutdown. Commissioner Dan Kuhns said in the rural areas it is very noticeable that the le vel of service has gone dow n. “It’s the fi rst time in fi ve ye ars [on the board] that I’ve got ten complaints,” he said. Commissioner Jim Peter- son said, however, he has g ot- ten more compliments th an complaints because peo ple understand the economy is down. He would not supp ort the new hire, he said. Last year’s fl oods only highlighted where the ho les were in maintenance, s aid Richman. “It’s not just be- cause of the fl oods; it was the worst year for road calls,” he said. Roads are what people see when they come into the county and they are one of the biggest economic too ls, he said. “We try to maint ain RICHMAN See COUNTY on A9 What chance do you think the Minnesota Legislature has in passing legislation similar to that being attempted in Wisconsin, Ohio and other states regarding benefits for public employees? FARIBAULT DailyNews WEM slips by K-W/B1 [|xbIDFDCy00001lz[ TUESDay MARCH 15, 2011 www.faribault.com Serving Faribault and Rice County, Minnesota 75¢ Did you know... Cub Scout Pack 306 of Divine Mercy Catholic School will host a breakfast and bake sale fundraiser from 8:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. March 27 at the Faribault Knights of Co-lumbus. Proceeds will go for their pack activities and campout. They will be serving pancakes, French toast, eggs, ham, sausage, juice and milk, along with vari-ous fruit toppings.Tickets cost $6.50 in advance or $7.50 at the door for ages 10 and over. Tickets are $4 for children under age 10 in advance or at the door.Call Keith Brazil at 334-5200 or 334-3343. Question of the day Cast your vote at www.faribault.com. Today’s results from the previous poll question can be found on Page A4. Inside Business ....................A7Classifieds ............. B5-8Comics .......................B4Community News ......A6National News ...........A8Obituaries ..................A5Opinion ......................A4Sports .................... B1-3State News ................A3 Two SecTionS, 16 PageSVol. 98, no. 62 ©2011 Outside Chance of rain High: 41 Low: 28 Page B8 Lotteries Daily 3.......................8-2-2Northstar ........ 1-3-7-10-13 Gopher 5........ 2-6-8-30-47 Contact us Delivery..........333-3111circulation@faribault.com Newsroom.....333-3134jsmith@faribault.com Classifieds.....333-3123class2@faribault.com FAX...............333-3102 Angel Gonzalez2nd GradeLincoln Elementary Find us on the Web and on Facebook faribault.com faribault.com faribault.com QUAKE By Joseph Lindbergjlindberg@faribault.com Twice in the last month the city council has extended a job offer to a police officer candidate — and twice those candidates have accepted jobs elsewhere. So when Faribault’s Civil Service Commission met Monday morning to certify yet another name for the pool of three candidates the city council needs to choose from, a little superstition wasn’t uncalled for. “Crossing my fingers and toes here,” said Police Chief Dan Collins. “Hopefully we can get the ball rolling officially this time.”It has been a busy month for the three-person commission, which is required to meet each time police or fire personnel need to be hired by the city. The panel evaluates candidates that make it past the initial screening process, gauging test scores, offering input and asking questions.The candidates choosing other municipalities over Faribault is not a concern, Collins said. It is mostly a matter of timing — some cities are further along in their processes than others, and much depends on the individual candidate’s own timeline. While the commission does not have decision-making power, it selects which three candidates the council chooses from, cementing itself as a piece of a more comprehensive process. Civil Service Commission hopes third time will be the charm cAUght in thE By Joseph Lindbergjlindberg@faribault.com More than 10,000 people are missing and 350,000 are home-less in northern Japan after a cata-strophic 8.9 magnitude earthquake triggered a 15- to 30-foot tsunami Friday. The disaster crippled the northern regions of the country, even as thousands of relief work-ers and soldiers surge into affected areas. In Tokyo, more than 240 miles away from the epicenter, a Faribault family rode out the quake — and continues to cope with the aftermath. Aftershocks that would normally be considered earth-quakes if not preceded by Friday’s event continue to rock the city and disrupt services, the most recent a 5.7-magnitude quake that hit at about 2 p.m. CST Monday.E-mails from Kris Sauer, wife of David Sauer — a Faribault High School and Gustavus Adolphus College graduate — help portray how both the Japanese people are dealing with the disaster and how the Sauers themselves communi-cated with their family more than 6,000 miles away. Friday At 3:30 a.m. Friday morn-ing, Helen Sauer, David’s mother, awoke to the sound of her husband, Dr. Howard Sauer, talking on the phone. It couldn’t be good.“When your phone rings that early, you know something is up,” Helen said. “I was subbing at school, a class of 4-year olds. They all got under the tables while I watched the walls move, the trees sway, the light poles out the window bend over. It lasted five to six minutes. I kept waiting for neighboring build-ings to come down but none did. It was the scariest darned thing of my entire life.” — Excerpt of Kris Sauer’s e-mail recounting the initial quake.David works at the American embassy in Tokyo. Fluent in Man-darin Chinese, he and his fam-ily have also been stationed in the Philippines, Taiwan and Beijing. The Sauers’ entire family is adept at keeping in touch across the vast distances. “I can’t describe the feelings you go through when you hear about something like this,” Helen said. “But knowing they were OK, right away, it helps. We keep in contact as best we can.”Kris and David Sauer live in the sixth floor of a high rise on the U.S. compound in Tokyo with their two daughters. What many fail to really comprehend, Helen said, is how dense Tokyo is. More than 13 mil-lion people live in the 844-square mile city — roughly 15,000 people per square mile. “Amazingly, no visible damage anywhere. We had to wait another hour at the compound until they determined that our buildings are safe to enter. Overhead highways are closed. The roads are jammed. The subways are closed. Imagine 10 million people trying to get home — on foot.” — Excerpt of Kris Sauer’s e-mail describing the state of Tokyo Friday night. Saturday Trust is paramount. “You have to trust the U.S. gov-ernment will keep them safe. You have to trust their intelligence,” Helen said. “You don’t sleep well.” A Faribault family’s e-mails from Tokyo shed light on the disaster Top: Indian students burn candles to pray for the victims of the tsunami in Ja-pan, in Allahabad, India, Monday. Above: A woman looks for her father-in-law’s “ihai” spirit tablet, a placard to desig-nate his seat in a house, in Ofunato, northern Japan. (AP photos) Shattuck St. Mary’s School School officials are reaching out to alumni in Japan, and have already made contact with some — but not all. During a faculty meeting Mon-day morning, the school took ac-count of its connections in Japan and was grateful to learn most were in the south, away from the exten-sive damage in the north.“We are hearing from families, we are hearing from alumni,” said Amy Wolf, director of communica-tions at SSM. “But this is an ongo-ing process, and we will continue to monitor the situation.”The disaster does not directly impact any students currently en-rolled at SSM, other than interna-tional flight complications due to overwhelmed airports in Japan as students travel back to Minnesota after their spring break.SSM begins class this week. Markman FamilyMaria Markman, daughter of Todd Markman — president of Re-liance Bank in Faribault — was in Norita when the earthquake struck.“We have been in communi- cation with her, she is safe,” said Todd Markman. “We are incredibly thankful for that.” Maria is part of The Young Americans, a group that puts on singing and dancing workshops for schoolchildren. She has been in Ja-pan for three months and is sched-uled to come home in early April.Todd said if she can, Maria wants to help in some way — preferably through the group’s workshops.“She said she was looking for-ward to bringing a bit of light in the midst of the darkness there,” Todd said. othEr fAribAUlt connEctions See COMMISSION on A2 See JAPAN on A2 By Allison Roordaaroorda@faribault.com The Faribault Public School Board approved a three-year, $534,030 Integra-tion Revenue grant on Mon-day night. This grant and the programs funded by it, said Director of Curriculum Liz Keenan, are meant to address certain goals: Increasing the cultural capital and decreasing the achieve-ment gap and addressing classroom participation.The Integration Revenue Plan, which would put the new grant money into several different programs over the next three years, is a revision of the 2010-11 plan, which has been in place this year through one-time state funds. Some changes to the plan include the elimination of K-7 Summer Programming, summer sports youth camps and inter/intra district op-portunities to connect youth with the communities. All of the resources now involved in these programs will be divided into different pro-grams, such as academic summer camps Sol and Free POPS and the Rosetta Stone program offered now to stu-dents, parents and staff at Jef-ferson Elementary. The Rosetta Stone pro-gram has been one of the suc-cesses in the Integration Plan over the year. Board approves grant to propel integration See SCHOOL on A3
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 51  Weeklies over 2,500–52 entries First Place: Northfield News Northfield Community Guide Very nice design - eye catching. Good, informative content. Second Place: Red Wing Republican Eagle Then & Now Nice section. Honorable Mention: Faribault County Register, Blue Earth Medical Guide Very clean, nice design. All Dailies–32 entries First Place: Austin Daily Herald Austin Daily Herald Profiles 2011 This is a truly outstanding special section—well-designed, well- written—a true joy to read. This staff should be extremely proud of producing such a wonderful publication. Second Place: Albert Lea Tribune Everyday Heroes: Progress 2011 The hard work put forth by this staff is most evident. The variety of material is impressive. Good work! Honorable Mention: West Central Tribune, Willmar Focus on Fun This is a nicely-prepared publication. It’s attractive—and fun to read!
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 52 All Weeklies –32 entries First Place: Hutchinson Leader Guide to Hutchinson 2011 This is a well-produced, attractive and outstanding publication. It’s a really nice read. Congratulations to this staff on a job well done! Second Place: Faribault County Register, Blue Earth Our Heroes The stories in this publication are well written and very interesting. Great work! Honorable Mention: Faribault County Register, Blue Earth Community Focus Attractive publication—nice work. All Dailies–14 entries First Place: Faribault Daily News 51 Things Clean and compelling design. Full of great images and information. Second Place: The Free Press, Mankato MN Valley Business April 2011 Nice layout, good stories, and great photos! Weeklies up to 2,500–4 entries First Place: Kenyon Leader Pigs, pigs everywhere! Record number of pigs at the fair, Aug. 12, 2011 Short, share-worthy and entertaining—everything web video should be. Second Place: St. Peter Herald Rabbit Road man commuted to St. Peter A great way to let readers see exactly how this guy got to work. Captured the experience in a way just photos or text would not. Best Use of Video Best Magazine
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 53  Weeklies over 2,500–7 entries First Place: Northfield News Northfield Boys Basketball: Jordan Bardwell nails a buzzer-beater No frills here, but none are needed. This video gets right to the point, showing readers the shot that everyone would be talking about for days. Now they also can easily watch it over and over and over again. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune Water Carnival Bed Races Energized and polished, this video captures the fun spirit of the races and provides key information (like the winners) that lets this video stand alone as a storytelling device. Honorable Mention: Waseca County News Summer’s King Catch There was no obvious reason this needed to be a video, but I couldn’t stop watching it. Who wouldn’t have posted this video to Facebook to share with their friends? A charming way to promote a contest. All Dailies–11 entries First Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester Wasioja Civil War Days Gives an excellent account of the event. Explains why the viewer should care and what he’s seeing. Nice use of ambient sound to complete the story. Couldn’t tell same story any other way—see and hear soldiers, guns in action. Second Place: St. Cloud Times School bus hits duplex Complete story in video with official account and people who experienced the wreck. Nice to see bus being taken out of building, too—couldn’t be done with just photos. Best Use of Video
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 54 Best Use of Multimedia Weeklies up to 2,500–3 entries First Place: ECM Post Review, North Branch 2011 Relay for Life raises nearly $92,000 The video online is a nice supplement to the story that appears in the printed newspaper. Second Place: Blaine-Spring Lake Park Life Blaine-based film shoot features B-17 bomber Good use of both video and a robust photo gallery to supplement the written word. Great editing, and compelling content, for the video. I wonder if the reporter enjoyed the ride? Weeklies over 2,500–6 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune Tamarac Refuge History Tour Great example of how multimedia, in this case video, can really enhance a traditional print story. Love the sights and sounds of the history tour. Second Place: Anoka County Union Thousands support military at Patriot Ride 2011 Great use of video to tell a powerful story. Also love the photo gallery - readers always want to see more photos than we can run in the newspaper (and way to make photos available for purchase - smart, new revenue stream). All Dailies–6 entries First Place: Post-Bulletin, Rochester Senior pageant This entry did a great job of simply telling a good story, which is ultimately what multimedia is supposed to do; it just happened that the story was told using an audio slideshow format. The photos are beautiful and its subjects quirky and fun, but the piece was also concise and to the point, getting the reader in and out quickly. Like any well-told story, this one is likely to stick in my mind for a while. Second Place: Faribault Daily News President Obama visits This entry did a good job of telling a story by using multiple platforms, from stories and photos to video and social media. It was a lot to take in, but you ultimately emerge with an indelible picture of the impact a president’s visit can have on a small town. County Admin Continued on page 2 It brought back memories PAGE 22 136th Year No. 3 Serving North Branch , Harris, Stacy, Rush City, Almelund and surrounding areas $1.00 WEdNESdAY, julY 27, 2 011The Post ReviewThe Post Review East Central Minnesota z car show News and general informat ion (651) 674-7025 • Fax (6 51) 674-7026 • e-mail: edit or.postreview@ecm-inc.com • Subscribe or place your classified ads online: www. ecmpostreview.comwww.ecmpostreview.com Opinions ........pages 4-5 Business ............. page 6 Community ........ page 7 Youth ................. page 8 Police report ...... page 9 Sports ........pages 10-11 Religion ........... page 13 Classifieds ........ page 20 Food & Fun ..... page 21 Calendar .......... page 21 TO SuBSCRIBE CAll 651-674-7025 Q R A p p R eq ui re d Scan Me! Smartphone Friendly Tracked 2D barcode pro vides a link directly to our web site. In The News This Week 2011 Relay for Life raises nearly $92,000 3rd annual Nite to Unite is set for Tuesday, Aug. 2 The third annual Nite to Unite is set for 6-9 p.m. Tueaday, Aug. 2 at Central Park in North Branch. This is a night to gath- er as a community. The North Branch Police Department is making this event happen so that people can reach out to one another in greater understanding. You can eat hot dogs, pop and cake, share a laugh, smile, a hello and the music, learn, ask questions, voice con- cerns and see displays from the NB fire depart- ment, police department, emergency services and a medical helicopter. Please bring a non perishable food item for the NB food pantry as well as school supplies. School supplies will be donated to the NB schools. Register to win an emergency escape lad- der, kids get a coloring book and other numer- ous prizes. By MaryHelen Swanson The current Lake Elmo city administrator has bee n chosen by the county boar d to be the next Chisag o County administrator. Seventy-seven people re- cently applied for the ope n administrator positio n which John Moosey left t o take a job in Alaska. A selection committee reviewed the application s and 9 were interviewed ; four were selected for a ful l- board interview which too k place July 13. The finalists were Al- bert Roder, Ron Moors e, Kristine Nelson Fuge, an d Bruce Messelt. A decision was to be made at the county board meetin g last week. Fifth District Commis- sioner Mike Robinson mad e a motion to hire Kristin e Fuge with his second choic e being Albert Roder. But no one supported his motion with a second. Fuge, who is currently serving as Interim Count y Administrator, had submi t- ted a letter to the boar d on the 18th withdrawin g her name from the proces s saying that after more de - liberation she believes sh e can best serve the count y through her work as lega l counsel. Cliff Buchan Forest lake Times News Editor There is plenty of dam- age at Curtis Lendt’s hom e in Wyoming which is mor e than 100 years old after a late night fire on Saturday. But Lendt, 88, is alive to see the damage thanks t o the fast action of a city po - lice officer and the fire chie f. Lendt was awakened and helped from the hom e shortly before midnigh t after the two-story, wood - frame home caught fire in a second-story bedroom. Wyoming police officer Tom Cockburn was first o n the scene after the fire wa s reported at 11:24 p.m.. H e was quickly joined by Wy - oming Fire Chief Denn is Berry. The two forced-open the locked door and foun d Lendt in a downstairs bed - room, Berry said on Mon - day. “He [Lendt] didn’t know the house was on fire,” Be r- ry said. “We got him out o f there.” Fast action saves life of former county commissioner in burning home Curtis Lendt was asleep as his Wyoming home burned Lendt Continued on page 2 Lake Elmo administrator to take over county admin job By MaryHelen Swanson At least one day of the 2010 Hay Days event wa s a fiasco, people especiall y living near the Chisag o County site would probabl y agree. It is the hope of the coun- ty zoning office, count y commissioners, sheriff ’s department, highway de - partment, the Sno Baron s, Sunrise Township and res i- dents that there will not b e a repeat of the events tha t led to a traffic backup th e likes of which this count y has never before seen. Car s were backed up from th e site, west of Almelund, clea r into North Branch and o n almost all other roads lead - ing up to the site. So, during this year, the club and county togethe r have been working on a li st of 13 items that, when ad - dressed, should help mak e the event more pleasant fo r all involved. Sno Barons working with county to make Hay Days go smoother this year Don’t want it tying up county, says commissio ner Hay Days update Continued on page 2 By Victoria dahlin The Rush City school board met Thursday, Jul y 21 and made the necessar y preparations to begin th e new school year, as well a s approved the payment o f bills and the five-year cap i- tal expenditure plan. The five-year capital ex- penditure plan is an est i- mated time frame with cos ts of maintenance and im - provements to the schools. The plan includes fu- ture plans to upgrade an d change out computer lab s that are older than fou r to five years old, over th e course of the next five year s. In 2013 the board hopes t o replace the outdated com - puter switches in labs, a s well as resurface the track , which was last resurfaced i n June 2003. Another area fo r money to be spent will b e on parking lot resurfacin g and the Tiger Trail. The board approved the schools’ handbooks, studen t activities handbook, tran s- portation policy and calen - dar. High school principa l Stuart Fuhs and elementar y principal Melody Tenho ff explained the mostly mino r changes to the faculty an d student handbooks. These changes include raises in high school lunc h and milk prices and a change in the high schoo l grading system. Full lunch price will in- crease form $2.10 to $2.1 5 and milk will raise from .4 5 to .50. Visitors lunch will g o from $3 to $3.25. The board approved Busi- ness Manager Lauree n Frost’s recommendatio n that Delta Dental, Nationa l Insurance Services and Co - lonial Life be the vendor s providing the voluntary in - surance benefits to the di s- trict. The health and safety in- spection program was re - viewed and approved as we ll as the system accountabilit y report which is published i n the school calendar. The coaching assignments were approved with pos i- tions still open for C team volleyball coach, assistan t golf coach and assistan t softball coach. RC School Board make p reparations for 2011-12 school year Lunch, milk prices up s lightly Photo by Cliff Buchan The 100-year-old home owned by Curtis Lendt of Wyoming was damaged by fire late Saturday nig ht, but the 88-year-old for mer county commissio ner was helped from the buil ding by Wyoming Fire Ch ief Dennis Berry and city po lice officer Tom Cockbu rn. RC school board Continued on page 2 Photos by MaryHelen Swa nson A butterfly release has become a permanent pa rt of the local Relay for Life event. A butterfly for ea ch survivor was donate d by Jack and Jeany St etler and Fairview Lakes Med ical Center. Jeany Stetle r’s Monarch was so eag er to be free that it flew swift ly into the sky. She wat ched happily as it gaine d its freedom. Pat Kennedy, a three-year survivor, is c ongratulated with jubila tion by Relay committee mem bers. More photos on pa ge 8. By MaryHelen Swanson A busy night at the North Branch council, Monda y, July 25, found the counci l- ors approving the additio n of two new members of th e NB Volunteer Fire Depar t- ment. Lindsay Koolmo an d Dane Olson were added t o the roster upon the recom - mendation of the fire de - partment officers who in - terviewed and screened th e two. Both new firefighter s will be on 12-month proba - tion. There are currently 25 members of the NBFD. At the work session be- fore the regular meetin g this week, Fire Chief Kevi n Grote gave a thorough pre - sentation on the need for a new fire truck. It began with a history of the North Branch Fir e Department going back t o the 1890s when the popula - tion of the Village of Nort h Branch was 685 or 19 peo - ple per square mile in cit y limits. The department was ac- tually established May 14 , 1895 and had 48 origina l members. The 2010 census shows a population of 10,125 o r 281 people per square mi le in city limits, limits tha t now cover an additional 4 5 square miles. Two fire fighters added t o NB team New fire fighters Continued on page 3 Treasure Hunters strike silver in NB By jon Tatting The Treasure Hunt- ers Roadshow has paid big bucks for a George Washington handwrit- ten letter, Johnny Cash’s bed, a document signed by Abraham Lincoln, a Civil War-era sword and even a vampire killing kit. At the AmericInn last week in North Branch, one local resident pre- sented a great great- grandfather’s journal documenting the pursuit of John Wilkes Booth following the assassina- tion of President Lin- coln. It is unknown if an offer was made and ac- cepted on the authentic journal. Treasures Continued on page 3
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 55  Weeklies up to 2,500–2 entries First Place: The Parkers Prairie Independent, LLC The Parkers Prairie Independent, LLC on Facebook Nice use of Facebook to connect with the community by posting community photos and soliciting people’s photos. Weeklies over 2,500–4 entries First Place: The Journal, Minneapolis The Journal on Twitter & Tumblr Good use of Twitter to share news, solicit opinions and publicize Tumblr photos. Tumblr feed shows understanding of best ways to use specific platform with short posts, clips, links and photos. Second Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune DL Sports Guy on Twitter Good use of Twitter for real-time coverage key to sports events. Also like that the effort includes attention to how to integrate website and print, too. All Dailies–6 entries First Place: St. Cloud Times Halfway Jam Good use of all tools available to provide complete coverage of an event, including real-time coverage through Twitter and archive of coverage through Storify. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead The Forum Flood Blogs This compilation of blogs on the newspaper’s website is a good use of tools already in place to crowdsource information on a major local event. Best Use of Social Media
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 56 Herman Roe Editorial Writing Award All Newspapers–37 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, Jack Zaleski Fargo tree ordinance falls short What an editorial should be—crisp language, tightly written with a strong point of view. There is no question where the writer stands, and the solution is clearly stated. Second Place: The McLeod County Chronicle, Glencoe, Rich Glennie So what did police chief do that caused him to give up his job? This editorial points out the responsibility government has to the public. No mushy language. Nice. C4 The Forum of Fargo-Moorh ead Sunday, July 17, 2011OPINION E very year at The Forum, we welcome several paid summer interns. While the interns always learn a lot during their s tay, and do exactly the same kind of work that our professionals do, we ben efit from them as well. Today’s youth, and what they’re interested in, hel ps us see fresh perspectives . They also push us to question some long-held ways of doing things. But perhaps most importantly, they consistently remind us o f why we got interested in our professions to begin with and why we’re so lucky to do this work for a living. Here’s a look at this year ’s outstanding crop: Danielle Cintron Home: LaPlace, La. College: Graduates this fall from Louisiana Tech University, Ruston Focus: Journalism and English Wants to do: Foreign or combat correspondence What her reporting internship has taught her so far, in her words: “Otter Tail” is two words in every instance except on e: Ottertail is also a town in Minnesota. Josie Clarey Home: Bridgewater, S.D . College: Junior at the University of South Dak ota, Vermillion Focus: English educatio n; minors in journalism an d Spanish Wants to do: Teach high school English and work as the teacher/adviser for a school newspaper, but fir st explore journalism and g et more experience What her reporting internship has taught her so far, in her words: It’ s given me the opportunity to see how I might fit in at a newspaper. It’s made me realize how diverse the positions and parts of th e job are. Stephanie Fail Home: Boston College: Senior at the University of Massachusetts, Boston Focus: Anthropology Wants to do: International multimedia journalism; travel by boa t around the world What her reporting internship has taught her so far, in her word s: I feel more in touch with being American because I am being exposed to the people who live in its heartland. All this Vikin g culture is new to me, an d very interesting! It has allowed me to write for a huge audience while learning a lot about the do’s and don’ts of writing for the public. Chris Franz Home: Mandan, N.D., an d Fargo College: Graduates this fall from Minnesota Stat e University Moorhead Focus: Mass communications and photojournalism Wants to do: Photojournalism for a while, preferably for newspapers. I always lik e to have some sort of long- term/documentary proje ct in the works as well. I am also thinking about grad school so I can eventuall y teach. What his photography internship has taught him so far, in his word s: This being my second internship, there haven’t been any surprises with the job. This job is more abo ut giving me an experience of what it’s like to be a photographer in a newsroom. Ben Karkela Home: Grand Rapids an d Savage, Minn.; West Farg o College: Graduated from Minnesota State Univers ity Moorhead Focus: Mass communications with an emphasis in print journalism Wants to do: Work as a journalist, but plans to s tart his career as an English teacher in Japan What his sports reporting internship has taught him so far, in h is words: I’ve discovered what it takes to be a professional journalist. I learned how to write captivating and informa tive stories, all on a deadline . It isn’t always easy, but it’s exciting. Emma Murray Home: Council Bluffs, Iowa College: Sophomore at the University of South Dakota, Vermillion Focus: English, journalism and women’s studies Wants to do: Internation al correspondent or freelanc e writer; join the Peace Cor ps after college What her reporting internship has taught her so far, in her words: It has given me a more accurat e depiction of what a care er in print journalism/a da ily newspaper will be like. From that, I’ve learned h ow much I enjoy the upbeat nature of the job – there ’s always something new to cover. Michael Smith Home: Oak Park, Ill., an d Fargo College: Graduated from Minnesota State Univers ity Moorhead Focus: Mass communications with an emphasis in online journalism and graphic communications Wants to do: Sports writing or page design a t a newspaper or magazine What his sports reporting internship h as taught him so far, in h is words: I have really lear ned to write on a deadline. M any of my assignments have had late starts or run late an d I have been crunched for time. Von Pinnon is editor of The Fo rum. Reach him at (701) 241-5579 or mvonpinnon@forumcomm.com Liberal argument is hardly serious By Barry Barringer Fargo I was amused by the June 10 Doonesbury cartoon, a perfect “straw man” a rgu- ment. Teaching intellig ent design does not inv olve teaching the crea tion account from Genesis. H on- estly, don’t liberals have any real arguments? Teaching intelligent d e - sign involves teaching how living cells contain com plex circuits and minia ture motors. When the DNA m od- ule contains a four-cha rac- ter digital code similar to a computer code, such a sys- tem points to a mind, n ot a material process. Just as some mock the cr e- ation account in Gene sis, others find it easy to m ock the theory of evolution. C on- sider how evolution ass em- bled all the body parts and then gave those body p arts consciousness. Later, ev olu- tion gave these walk ing, talking, thinking body p arts the ability to create art and music because both ac tivi- ties were necessary for our survival. Evolution also made us sympathetic to other m em- bers of our species to ai d us in our survival. What an ingenious impersonal f orce is evolution. ‘Cop’ unfortunate word in headline By K.W. Covey Moorhead It seems to me a better headline for the story of the Bismarck police off icer shot and killed would no t be “cop” as a designation for the deceased. He gave his life to protect people. All law enforcement pe o- ple or officers are doing this as part of their jobs and deserve our continu ing respect and thanks. Fargo tree ordinance falls short A proposed Fargo tree ordinance appears to be an overly complex bureaucratic bromide th at will not sufficiently addr ess the willy-nilly destruction o f mature trees in the city. Instead of focusing primarily on developers with chain saws and bulldozers, the ordinance would establish punitive protocols aimed at the individual homeowner who might want to remove a backyard tree. Moreover, the tree replacement provisions of the ordinance seem to give the clear-cut gang a pass, as long as they replace mat ure trees with new (and, of course , smaller) trees. Furthermore, if the Far go Park District has its way, the c ity’s park lands would be exempt f rom a city ordinance. Park officials insist parks have in-house fore stry expertise; tree preservat ion rules are in force. Therefore, t he argument goes, the distr ict should not be bound by city reg ulations. The argument has a cou ple of holes. First, much of the urban forest is in the parks. If (and it’s a big if) the city can write tree prese rvation regulations that are toug her than the park district’s, the ci ty’s should prevail. Second, the unn ecessary ripping down of several mid-life ash trees in Lindenwood Par k a few days ago to allegedly ma ke room for a flood levee suggests th e park district’s sensibility abo ut trees in its own parks is not wha t it should be. The city’s proposal seem s ready- made to fail, not because the goals are flawed but because it is too complicated to be effecti ve. Instead of tapping into the stron g sentiment among Fargo residents t o preserve mature trees, especially in new neighborhoods, the city is flirting with an intrusive schem e that would require city appro val every time a homeowner want ed to remove a yard tree for w hatever reason.The plan’s tree measurements, incentive s, fines and inspections guarantee co nfusion and invite litigation. The city’s tree managem ent problem is not the home owner with an unwanted tree. It’s th e rip-’em- down practice of some la rge property owners and com mercial developers. They seem u nwilling to summon the creativity t o preserve old-growth and mature t rees that might have been part of old farmsteads and tree belt s but now are prime development t racts within the city limits. Th e city’s neglect has, in effect, en abled the urge to clear-cut. A new ordinance should mandate that res idential and commercial footprints accommodate existing tr ees. The current no-policy blunde r suggests the tail has been waggin g the dog for a long time. Tweak and revise the pr oposed ordinance. Get it right. H elp Fargo measure up to its design ation as a “Tree City USA,” which right now is laughable. Forum editorials represent th e opinion of Forum management and the newspap er’s Editorial Board. Today’s issue: Fargo considers a new tree ordinance. Our position: Focus on the larger problem, not a backyard tree. At least 3 showed courage T hank you, Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman, from the bottom of our hearts and the pit of our stomachs. And, yes, Tim Pawlenty, too. It is entirely gratifying that these three demonstrate d the political courage to just say no to a ridiculous “marriage vow” concocted by a segment of the Republican Party’s so-called base. Huntsman and Romney went first, politely declining to be intimidated or coerced by an advocacy group, The Family Leader, into making meaningless promises in exchange for endorsements. Huntsma n issued a blanket rejection of all p ledges; Romney’s organization issued a statement saying that th e pledge included provisions tha t were undignified and inappro priate for a presidential campaign. Pawlenty added his name to the li st of non- signers on Wednesday. Pawlenty took the leap a fter thinking it over for a wh ile. Michele Bachmann and Rick San torum both signed. That Romney hesitated – and Pawlenty found it necess ary to engage in prolonged mu lling – is disappointing, but all ge t points for declining. If I may tweak Romney’s representative’s stateme nt just a tad: The entire pledge, n ot just certain provisions, is un dignified and inappropriate – for a ny reason whatsoever. Not only did the pledge originally include (unti l a few days ago) the outrageously ig norant suggestion that black ch ildren were better off during s lavery because they were more likely to be raised in a two-paren t household (except, of co urse, when the parents were sold se parately), but it also requires that candidates promise to be faithful to their spouses. Really. It would be hard to find more unlikely candidat es for infidelity concerns than Huntsman and Romney, both Mormons whose lives q ualify them for Eagle Scout Em eritus. Pawlenty is similarly sp it-shined. From all appearances, t hey’re the sort who live in accorda nce with their moral values with out needing to flaunt their virtue or demanding that others admire and emulate their example. They walk the walk – and we’re pe rfectly free to ignore them. Not so The Family Lead er. Never mind the cultish title. W hat possible good would a fi delity pledge do? Guarantee m arital bliss? Make Mitt, Jon and Tim better husbands? Better role m odels? What grade are we in? In the traditional marriage the se hall monitors so want to pro tect, grown- ups pledge fidelity to the ir betrothed, witnessed by God (or a judge), usually in the pr esence of canyons of friends and f amily. Who are these “leaders” to in sist they deserve a higher degree of assurance? Off with the ir tiny little heads. Other provisions of the Iowa group’s pledge include a promise to support traditional marr iage, a ban on pornography and reje ction of Sharia law. There’s a gre at deal to be said about all of the a bove, and serious, thoughtful deba te is ongoing. But complex so cial issues deserve greater consider ation than a simplistic thumbs-up o r thumbs- down. And no presidenti al candidate should be requ ired to play dumb for the sake o f those who have displayed only righ teous self- regard. Republicans have a chan ce to reclaim the White House , but only if they distance themselve s from the sort of constituents who demand pledges. The Family Lea der and other similar groups ma y go about their lives as they choos e, but they’re busybodies by an y other name, and their hour of strutting and fretting upon the sta ge surely must be about up. Parker’s email is kathleenpar ker@washpost.com. OUR OPINION � PARKER OPINION � Interns help remind us why we got into journalism YOUR OPINION � FROM THE EDITOR� The Forum Published since 1878 A Pulitzer Prize-winning newspap er Bill Marcil Jr. Publisher publisher@forumcomm.com Jack Zaleski Editorial Page Editor (701) 241-5521 jzaleski@forumcomm.com Matthew Von Pinnon Editor (701) 241-5579 mvonpinnon@forumcomm.com MATTHEW VON PINNON Editor � KATHLEEN PARKER Tribune Media Services � Fargo tree ordinance fal ls short Jack Zaleski A proposed Fargo tree ordin ance appears to be an overly complex bureaucratic brom ide that will not sufficiently address the wi lly-nilly destruction of ma ture trees in the city. Inste ad of focusing primarily on developers with chain sa ws and bulldozers, the ordin ance would establish puniti ve protocols aimed at the individual homeowne r who might want to remove a backyard tree. Moreover, the tree replace- ment provisions of the ordin ance seem to give the clear- cut gang a pass, as long as t hey replace mature trees with new (and, of co urse, smaller) trees. Furthermore, if the Fargo P ark District has its way, the city’s park lands would be e xempt from a city ordinance. Park officials in sist parks have in-house fo restry expertise; tree pres ervation rules are in force. Therefore, the argum ent goes, the district should not be bound by city regula tions. The argument has a couple of holes. First, much of the urban f orest is in the parks. If (an d it’s a big if) the city can w rite tree preservation regulations that are tougher than the park district’s, the city’s should prevail. Secon d, the unneces- sary ripping down of severa l mid-life ash trees in Linde nwood Park a few days ago to allegedly make room for a flood levee sug gests the park district’s se nsibility about trees in its own parks is not what it should be. The city’s prop osal seems readymade to fail, not because the goals are flawed but because it is too complicated to be effe ctive. Instead of tapping int o the strong sentiment amo ng Fargo residents to preserve mature trees, especially in new neighbo rhoods, the city is flirting with an intrusive scheme that would require city appr oval every time a homeown er wanted to remove a yard tree for whatever reason. The plan’s tree measurem ents, incentives, fines and inspections guarantee con fusion and invite litigation. The city’s tree ma nagement problem is not th e homeowner with an unwa nted tree. It’s the rip-’emdown practice of som e large property owners and commercial developers. Th ey seem unwill- ing to summon the creativit y to preserve old-growth an d mature trees that might h ave been part of old farmsteads and tree bel ts but now are prime develo pment tracts within the city limits. The city’s neglect has, in effect, enable d the urge to clear-cut. A ne w ordinance should mandat e that residential and commercial footprints a ccommodate existing trees. The current no-policy blun der suggests the tail has been wagging the dog fo r a long time. Tweak and re vise the proposed ordinance . Get it right. Help Fargo measure up to its des ignation as a “Tree City USA ,” which right now is laugha ble.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 57  Herman Roe Editorial Writing Award The Herman Roe Editorial Award given annually by the Minnesota Newspaper Association is in memory of a man who was, for more than 50 years, publisher of the Northfield News until his death in 1961. For many years, he was a National Editorial Association (now NNA) field director and was named an honorary president of the Minnesota Editorial Association (now MNA). He was given the coveted Amos Award in 1958 by the national association. Across the nation, because of his work as a field director, he was known as “Mr. Country Editor.” He was extremely interested in politics and believed newspapers should take strong editorial stands. Strangely, while he encouraged his editors to write editorials, during the periods that he edited his paper, he did not write formal editorials. But every week, there was his column on the editorial page, at least a newspaper column long, that really included a group of editorials. Past Recipients Contest Period 1972-1973 Lynn Smith, Monticello Times 1973-1974 Owen Heiberg, Herman Review 1974-1975 Karen Anderson, Henning Advocate 1975-1976 Larry Davenport, New Hope-Plymouth Post 1976-1977 Peggy Bakken, Osseo-Maple Grove Press 1977-1978 Bill Macklin, The Journal, New Ulm 1978-1979 Frank Sisser, The Waconia Patriot 1979-1980 Myron J. Schober, Tri-County Record, Rushford 1980-1981 Jerry Ringhofer, Owatonna People’s Press 1981-1982 Karen Kitchen, Isanti News 1982-1983 Jim Blubaugh, International Falls Daily Journal 1983-1984 Mike Adair, Brooklyn Park Post 1984-1985 Jim Pumarlo, Red Wing Republican Eagle 1985-1986 Bill Hanna, Mesabi Daily News, Virginia 1986-1987 William C. Boyne, Rochester Post-Bulletin 1987-1988 Ron Lindquist, Starbuck Times 1988-1989 Arlin Albrecht, International Falls Daily Journal 1989-1990 Mary Rains & Jim Baden, Mille Lacs Messenger, Isle 1990-1991 Debra J. Flemming, Owatonna People’s Press 1991-1992 Cathy Hay, Albert Lea Tribune 1992-1993 Paul Adams, Agri News, Rochester 1993-1994 Steve Prinsen, Annandale Advocate 1994-1995 Kitty Anderson, Biwabik Times 1995-1996 Tim Krohn, The Free Press, Mankato 1996-1997 Julie Nordine, The Exponent, East Grand Forks 1997-1998 Julie Nordine, North Star News, Karlstad 1998-1999 Tom Klein, Daily Journal, International Falls 1999-2000 Al Edenloff, Echo Press, Alexandria 2000-2001 Randy Krebs, St. Cloud Times 2001-2002 Al Edenloff, Echo Press, Alexandria 2002-2003 Nathan Bowe, Detroit Lakes Newspapers 2003-2004 Al Edenloff, Echo Press, Alexandria 2004-2005 Brad Swenson, The Bemidji Pioneer 2005-2006 Randy Krebs, St. Cloud Times 2006-2007 Robin Washington, Duluth News Tribune 2007-2008 Erik Posz, Redwood Gazette, Redwood Falls 2008-2009 Larry Dobson, Star Herald, Dodge Center/Hayfield 2009-2010 Randy Krebs, St. Cloud Times 2010-2011 Jack Zaleski, The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Editorial Leadership Awards Winners of the BNC Best Editorial Portfolio The Best Editorial Portfolio award recognizes overall excellence in locally-written editorials. The award is intended to recognize sustained quality of locally-written editorials as reflected by a broad sample of a newspaper’s editorials. Past First Place Recipients: 1998-1999 Detroit Lakes Newspapers St. Cloud Times 1999-2000 Cloquet Journal Red Wing Republican Eagle 2000-2001 Echo Press, Alexandria Post-Bulletin, Rochester 2001-2002 Houston County News, La Crescent St. Cloud Times 2002-2003 McLeod County Chronicle, Glencoe The Daily Journal, Fergus Falls 2003-2004 Becker County Record, Detroit Lakes Owatonna People’s Press 2004-2005 Detroit Lakes Tribune St. Cloud Times 2005-2006 McLeod County Chronicle, Glencoe Marshall Independent 2006-2007 Agri-News, Rochester Marshall Independent 2007-2008 McLeod County Chronicle, Glencoe St. Cloud Times 2008-2009 Northfield News St. Cloud Times 2009-2010 Chaska Herald Duluth News Tribune 2010-2011 Northfield News Post-Bulletin, Rochester Editorial Writing Awards
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 58 All Weeklies –67 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune, Paula Quam Into the Roosevelt War Zone Headline drew me in to find out what the Roosevelt War Zone was. Well-rounded story with comments from parents, custodian/ traffic director. Article included how the school board plans to address the congestion. Witty comments about the NATO comparison and white flag added a touch of lightness to the story. Good connection of calling the pick-up situation a war zone in the first paragraph and raising the white flag to the end the war to sum up the article. Overall, good approach with coverage and to the point. Second Place: Becker County Record, Nate Bowe State shutdown: How it affects you Story takes a unique, witty approach to a serious situation that affects millions. Subhead sections make for an easy read. Enjoyed the subheads leading with the general if this... and explanation to follow. The unique way to present the factual information with sections, short sentences and light writing is why I gave the article a second place finish. Honorable Mention: Thisweek Farmington/Lakeville, Laura Adelmann Teacher led students’ flap over chickens Great specific details into text messages the mayor received. Understandable timeline of events as to what set the story in motion. Well-rounded article with comments from the teacher, mayor, principal. All Dailies–48 entries First Place: Mesabi Daily News, Virginia, Bill Hanna Virginia Police Civil Service Commission Trial of Dana Waldron Great work by the staff, and way to keep on top of it and cover from many different angles. Second Place: Duluth News Tribune, John Myers County Board Travel Expenses Great investigative work! Honorable Mention: Hibbing Daily Tribune, Kelly Grinsteinner Council Axes Redshaw Good hard news account of what was probably a very tense public meeting. Grinsteinner goes beyond the he said-she said, and gives context to the firing of the city’s top employee. Government/Public Affairs Reporting VOLUME 104, NO. 13 • W EDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011• DETROIT LAKES, MN NEWSSTAND $1.00 • 3 S ECTIONS Forecast High:38 Low:28 SUNDAY Chance of rain or snow Becker County’s #1 News Website www.dl-online.com High:44 Low:27 SATURDAY Mostly sunny High:40 Low:27 FRIDAY Slight chance of rain or snow High:39 Low:28 THURSDAY Chance of rain or snow High:37 Low:29 TODAY Wintery mix tonight FE AT U R E It’s the King, baby The DLHS drama departm ent presents “All Shook Up” featuring th e music of Elvis Presley with performa nces starting next week. Page 1C IN S ID E Clowning around The José Cole Circus came through DL for a performance Monday night. Page 2A Informing Becker County for over 100 years BY PAULA QUAM pquam@dlnewspapers.co m If you have ever picked u p or dropped off a child at Ro osevelt Elementary, you have b een to the war zone known a s “the north side.” Every weekday morn ing around 8 a.m. and afte rnoon around 3:30 p.m., the ba ttle be- gins as parents attempt t o jock- ey into position for a pick -up or drop off. “It’s nuts, it’s crazy,” said Roo- sevelt Principal Jerry H anson, adding, “I know when I’v e been up there I’ve gotten som e sign language from parent s,” he laughs. Hanson says when that a rea was built in 1990, it was d one so with 450 students in min d. Now, school enrollmen t is pushing 700, and that’s n ot the only complicating factor . “So many families have two working parents now, so there are a lot more people dr opping their kids off on the w ay to work,” Hanson said. Roosevelt parent, Stacy C onn says she doesn’t like how all the cars are put so close to gether while they sit waiting. “I don’t want to compl ain, but I see these kids try ing to squeeze between cars, an d I al- ways worry that a parent might accidentally let their fo ot off the brake or something. It’s so crazy there. It’s ridiculou s.” Officials at the school dis trict could be swooping in like NATO on a peacekeeping m ission though, as they begin talk s of re- doing that whole area. School leaders are set to b egin phase two of a three-part plan to alleviate traffic congest ion at the school. This summer, the $175 ,000 plan is to expand the nor theast parking lot, which will b ecome solely staff parking. Then comes the expen sive part. “We plan to revamp the w hole area south of the school (in the back of the building) s o that parents will no longer pic k their kids up on the north si de, but will do so on the sout h side where the buses are now ,” said the district’s business ma nager, Ted Heisserer. Heisserer says the traffic flow will be divided so that on e area is for parents and anothe r area is for buses. “We’ve looked at a lot of dif- ferent designs, and we no w pret- ty much have it mapped o ut how we want it to be,” said He isserer. Exactly when this will hap pen is still up in the air thou gh, as school officials still need to fig- ure out exactly how much it will cost and how they will pa y for it. “It would be nice if it hap- pened summer of ‘12, bu t real- istically it’ll probably be more like summer of ‘13,” sai d Heis- serer. In the meantime, school offi- cials are doing the best th ey can with what they’ve got. “We try to put more patrol s up there, and after school we have a gentleman trying to help direct traffic a little bit,” Hanso n said. That “gentleman” is Ron Badurek. A custodian at the sch ool, Badurek was given the job no- body wanted a couple of years ago. He says most of the par ents are accustomed to how things are there, but once in a w hile he does have to deal with on es that are a little “irate.” “I just try to keep my cool and explain the situation to them,” said Badurek. “And if tha t does- n’t work, I have them talk to the office about it.” Stacy Conn says how pe ople treat Badurek bothers he r even more than the traffic c onges- tion. “More than a few times I h ave seen parents yelling at hi m, and I feel so bad because it is n’t his fault.” So, for a while lon ger, Badurek will have to go od-na- turedly take parental abu se and parents will have to endur e more time in the battle zone un til the day the black tar is laid a nd the white flag raised. BRIAN BASHAM/TRIB UNE ROOSEVELT ELEMENT ARY SCHOOL custodian Ron Badurek has a laugh with parent Cheryl Hutch inson as she waits to pick up her kids after school Tuesday afte rnoon in the upper Roose velt parking lot. BRIAN BASHAM/TRIB UNE CUSTODIAN RON BAD UREK doubles as traffic d irector in the Roosevelt El ementary School upper pa rk- ing lot every afternoon as parents come to collect t heir children. WELL-GROOMED TRAILS Snowmobile club fights county plans BY NATHAN BOWE nbowe@dlnewspapers.com A Detroit Lakes snowmo bile club is not happy with a county proposal to quit grooming snow- mobile trails and turn the re- sponsibility over to area snow- mobile groups. The ULTRA (United La kes and Trails Riders Assoc iation) group has gone so far as to send out letters to businesses, w arning that the quality of the tra ils will diminish and winter to urists may go elsewhere if the county gets out of the snowm obile grooming business. “Becker County has mana ged the trail system for o ver 30 years,” the letter reads. “ During that time ULTRA Snow mobile Club has supported the county with volunteers and mo netary donations for equipme nt. Be- cause of the economic im pact of snowmobiling on local bu siness, we felt you would wan t to be made aware of the pe nding change in the county’s po sition.” For their part, county offi- cials say there’s no reaso n local snowmobile clubs can’t handle trail grooming and mainte nance, since that’s how it’s do ne just about everywhere else i n Min- nesota. “I think the clubs can do a bet- JOURNALIST AND AU THOR Roxana Saberi spent mor e than 3 months in an Iranian pr ison on trumped-up charges. TRAILS to page 10A ➤ ROXANA SABERI IN DL A taste of the terror that governs Iran BY VICKI GERDES vgerdes@dlnewspapers.co m One day in January 2009, Rox- ana Saberi was finishing up in- terviews for the book sh e was working on, packing and getting ready to leave her father’s native country of Iran, where s he had made her home since 200 3. The next day, her life had tak- en a drastic, dramatic tur n: Four members of the Iranian m ilitary police showed up at he r front door, ready to place her un der ar- rest for espionage. “I was terrified,” Saberi sa id — not only did she have no way of contacting her family b ack in Fargo, but she wasn’t sure anyone had seen her being take n from her home, so there was a possi- bility that no one would know what had become of her. Over the next 100 days of her captivity at Tehran’s Evin Prison — notorious for incidents of hor- rific violence and torture — Saberi SABERI to page 10ABY PIPPI MAYFIELD pmayfield@dlnewspapers.c om About 70 members of d ock and lift companies, resor t own- ers, lake associations and others interested in controlling a quatic invasive species gathered Tues- day morning for training — cour- tesy of the Minnesota D epart- ment of Natural Resourc es. Darrin Hoverson, DNR in va- sive species specialist out of the Itasca office, spoke to the group about aquatic invasive spe cies in area lakes, which ones are in Minnesota, and what need s to be done to prevent — or a t least slow — their spread. “The last thing you want i s to be known as is the guy w ho in- troduced zebra mussel to a lake,” he said. There are many things that can be listed as non- native species, even pheasants for ex- ample, but they aren’t cons idered invasive. It’s when the s pecies start taking a toll on the e cology, degrading water qualit y and causing other problems , that they are considered an inv asive. Millions of dollars are sp ent each year fighting in vasive DNR TRAINS LAKE PEOP LE TO SPOT THEM Homing in on invasives INVASIVES to page 10A ➤ The 11th annual Ver gas Maple Syrup Fest will b e held this Saturday, April 2 f rom 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Verga s Com- munity Center. Feast on some fresh, flu ffy hot pancakes topped wit h pure maple syrup — courtesy o f local syrup producers — alon g with sausage, juice and coffee . Tick- et prices are $8 for adults and $4 for children 12 and unde r. Enjoy entertainment fr om the DL Cloggers while savor- ing the delicious meal. There will also be many maple syrup- themed activities throu ghout the day. Sugarhouse tours will be available for those curious about how maple syrup is made . Grab a map at the Vergas Com muni- ty Center to visit one of the sugar shacks where d emon- strations of maple syru p pro- duction will be given, w eather permitting. The sap won’t be the o nly thing running during Satur- day’s festival, however. T he 5K Maple Syrup Run/Walk starts and ends at Billy’s Corn er Bar in Vergas. Registration wi ll be at 8 a.m. with the race star ting at STICKY CELEBRATION S TARTS SATURDAY Maple syrup in Vergas MAPLE to page 10A➤ A D S ➤Norby’s - Clearance Sale: page 8A ➤Nereson: page 11A ➤ Vergas Maple Syrup: page 6B ➤Washington Square Mall - Aeromodelers Show: page 2C ➤NEW! County Line Available Online SCHOOL HOPES TO MAK E DROP-OFF, PICK UP A LOT EASIER Into the Roosevelt war zone NEW Circulation Customer Service Phone Number Toll Free 877-398-4494 BREAKING NEWS INDEX Accent . . . . . . . . . . .A7 Business/Stock . . . . .A6 Classified . . . . . . . .B5-8 Comics . . . . . . . . . . .A8 Editorial /Opinion . . . .A4 Range Report/Obits . .A9 Sports/Scoreboard .B1-4 Weather/Forecast . . .A2 VOL. 117 - NO. 155© 2011(USPS/340-240) MESABIDAILYNEWS www.virginiamn.com High: 66 Low: 59 Up North 5 day forecast WEATHER 75¢ THURSDATHURSDAYYJ u l y 1 4 , 2 0 1 1 Newspaper of the Iron Range TWINS GM CONFIDENT GOING INTO SECOND HALF — B1 SSTTAATETE MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A50-year-old Minneapolis manhas died after being pulled froma swimming pool at a Min-neapolis apartment complex.The Hennepin County sher-iff’s office responded around 2p.m. Wednesday to a report ofa man found unconscious in the pool. Authorities say the man hadbeen with family memberswhile swimming in the indoorpool. First responders per-formed CPR, but the victimwas pronounced dead at Hen-nepin County Medical Center. By JESSE WHITE Staff Writer V IRGINIA — MountainIron City Councilor EdRoskoski is at the centerof yet another legal situation,this time concerning a dog-on-dog attack in March.Roskoski entered a plea ofnot guilty to a charge ofmisdemeanor public nuisanceduring a June 17 arraignmentin Sixth District Court inVirginia and is now scheduled to have a pre-trial hearing onAug. 3. The next stop after thatcould be a jury trial.According to court records,Roskoski, 67, was ticketed inMay as authorities allege a dogowned by either him or his sonattacked another person’s dog— possibly on command — ina wooded area near CarnationAvenue in Mountain Iron.Witnesses say the dog — alarge black German shepherd— injured a black lab owned by Mountain Iron residentMark Pucel after someoneyelled “sic them.”The alleged incident tookplace on March 27.Police say Pucel and hisgirlfriend were walking theirdogs — a yellow lab and ablack lab — in the area ofGardenia Street and 20thAvenue West when the allegedattack took place.According to the report, thecouple had just crossed a snowbank at the end of Gardenia Street and were heading onto aprivate lot they had permissionto be on when they sawRoskoski and the Germanshepherd to the south on sometrails in the woods.Pucel told investigators thathe might have heard Roskoskisay “sic them” prior to theGerman shepherd attacking.His girlfriend also said sheheard someone say “sic them.”Pucel also said he yelled forRoskoski to get his dog andstop the dog but that Roskoski did nothing. The black lab was bitten onits rear haunches on both sidesand sustained injuries but wasnot treated by a vet, the reportsaid. After the German shepherdstopped attacking the lab,Pucel and Roskoski exchangedwords, the report continued,and the couple eventuallycalled police. Two separate witnesses also Dog-on-dog case headed to trial for Mountain Iron Councilor Roskoski Virginia Mayor Steve Peterson listens toa question during his testimony. Virginia detective and Acting PoliceChief Dennis Benz testifies. Virginia City Operations Director JohnTourville testifies. Virginia Police Chief Dana Waldronlistens to testimony.M ayor Steve Peterson was directand concise on Wednesdaywhen asked about why DanaWaldron should no longer be Virginiapolice chief. And when Waldron’s counsel GreggCorwin tried to say the mayor andcouncilors had ulterior motives inputting Waldron on paid P olice Det. Dennis Benz testifiedthat he at times was “frightenedand didn’t know what to expect”from his superior, Police Chief DanaWaldron, the last couple years.Benz, who was named acting policechief when Waldron was put on paidadministrative leave Jan. 25, said thesituation within the police force had C ity Operations Director JohnTourville said that in the 18months prior to Police ChiefDana Waldron being put on paidadministrative leave he was often “...trying to protect him from himself.”Tourville cited instance afterinstance when Waldron hadresponded with anger and hostility to D ana Waldron listened quietlyWednesday as colleague aftercolleague testified that theworkplace he managed had turnedinto an inferno of hostility, withmorale “in the gutter.”The Virginia police chief, who hasbeen on paid administrative leavesince being put in that position by the TESTIMONY GIVEN BY HIGH-PROFILE VIRGINIA LEADERS VIRGINIA POLICE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION TRIAL OF DANAWALDRONHHOSTILEOSTILE WWORKPLAORKPLACECE DDESCRIBEDESCRIBEDCity presses its case; exchanges often testy, personal Virginia Police Department Detective Dennis Benz, center, testifies in Wednesday’s Police Civil Service Commission trial of PoliceChief Dana Waldron. The civil service trial is expected to last three days and is the result of a six-month investigation by the city of Waldron. Stories by Bill Hanna ~~ Photos by Mark Sauer By BILL HANNA Executive Editor V IRGINIA — TheVirginia PoliceDepartment was ahostile and intimidatingworkplace led by a policechief who managed withbullying tactics, retalia-tion and bad, if any, com-munication, several offi-cers testified on Wednes-day. The three-day PoliceCivil Service Commissiontrial against VirginiaPolice Chief DanaWaldron opened with theattorney hired by the cityto investigate whether thechief should be removedfrom his job saying thecase against him will beproven in an “A, B, D”and “1,2,3” fashion.“Abuse of authority,bullying and derelictionof duty,” will be proven Brandon Fitzsimmons ofFlaherty and Hood, P.A.,of St. Paul, the law firmprovided to the citythrough the Coalition ofGreater Minnesota Cities,said in his openingstatement. Waldron’s attorneyGregg Corwin said hewould withhold hisopening remarks until thepolice chief’s side of thecase is presented. Corwindid, however, aggressively cross-examine most of thecity’s 10 witnesses calledon Wednesday, includingreferring to a cartoon putup in the departmentsince Waldron was puton leave that he saiddepicted the police chiefin an unflattering way. Corwin also alluded towhat he believes is the Please see PETERSON A5 Please see BENZ A5 Please see TOURVILLE A5 Please see WALDRON A5 Please see CASE A5 Please see ROSKOSKI A5 Man, 50, found in pool, dies
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 59  All Newspapers–10 entroes First Place: Ely Timberjay Ruling: JCI must provide documents Clearly a case of a small weekly paper taking on the school board bureaucracy and a major corporation over the possibility of fraud or at best construction overcharges. The Timberjay made a big effort to request rulings under the Minnesota Data Practices Act, batter legal walls thrown up by a former US attorney and is now spending dollars on litigation. That shows any size paper can be the community watchdog. Second Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Moorhead & Fargo Fire Departments Investigation Good investigative reporting on two separate fire chiefs who didn’t maintain the standards of the position. Obtaining emails, personnel files and other documents takes work and guidance. The paper caused leadership changes at both departments by its actions. This is what a good daily does routinely. All Newspapers–15 entries First Place: Owatonna People’s Press Intent and reality do not always mesh Newspaper is up-front with angry readers, admits blowing the presentation of story about internet porn addiction. Nice explanation of the process of deciding how the story was to be presented. Rare we-were-wrong from a newspaper. Second Place: Hastings Star Gazette Behind the corkscrew scenes Excellent explanation of why the newspaper covered the arrest of a local police officer. It’s news, and sometimes people simply don’t understand that is a newspaper’s job. Freedom of Information Award Explanation of News Operations /Newspaper Ethics A4 Owatonna People’s Press Friday, July 29, 2011 Our View Readers Write Cutting edge of health care Here in Steele County, we are fo rtunate to have access to top-notch health care r ight here in our own community. With the Owatonna Healthcare Campus hous- ing an Allina Hospital facility, l ocal residents can be assured that they will be rece iving care that is among the best in the nation. While the facilities on the health care campus are brand new and considered s tate-of-the-art, administrators are always fi nding ways to improve not only the care that patients re ceive in Steele County, but the environment in which they receive that care. That spirit of continued improve ment lies be- hind the Owatonna Hospital’s F und for Excellence campaign, which allows both pr ivate and corpo- rate donors to contribute to the f acilities ability to take advantage of future opportu nities to deliver better health care — all without placing the full costs of those upgrades and adv ancements square on the backs of patients. We thank everyone who has alre ady taken the opportunity to donate to this wo rthy cause. Those donors have taken an active role in bettering our community on the most basic le vel — by improv- ing the quality and environment of health care in the community they have also im proved the qual- ity of life for countless area resi dents. The healthcare field is one that is ever-chang- ing, and to keep our local facilit y on the cutting edge requires money. Technolog y is changing on a near-daily basis, and the fa ct that hospital officials are striving to stay on top of any advancements — be they technological or aest hetic — should be reassuring to local residents and hospital patients. The Owatonna Hospital is a benefit to the whole community, and a source of prid e for Owatonna. The fact that facility admin istrators and offi- cials are seeking ways to impro ve the quality of care that residents can receive r ight here in town — while striving to keep the co st of delivering that care to patients down — is commendable. Owatonna People’s Press editor ials are the opinion of the Press editorial board. Oth er editorials, columns, letters and cartoons appearing o n this page are the opinions of the authors and artis ts and not necessarily the People’s Press. Disappointed by choice of photo I am writing to complain about the horrific picture on the front page of the Owatonna People’s Press July 27, 2011. The article entitled “Internet XXX, Waseca Man Details Struggles with Addi- tion to Pornography” included a huge pornographic picture. I am extremely disappointed that the staff at OPP would be so lacking in discernment when it comes to choosing a picture to accompany a story. The article details the epidemic of pornography addiction and how it can ruin a person’s life, marriage, and family. Yet, the picture with the article not only invites people to have a look at an in- appropriate image, it actually forces people to look at it. In the article it says that Smith’s problem began with some simple curiosity. This issue of the paper, with this explicit picture, could be that “simple curiosity” that first opens the door to pornography for someone. Think about it: This paper is delivered to many homes and places of business all over the area. There are young, impressionable boys who might get their first little glimpse of pornography with this picture. There are young girls who will have the idea further impressed into their minds that the only way to get attention and be desirable is to look like that picture and to exploit their bodies. There are other people who will see the picture that are already struggling with the temptation of pornography and are doing their best to fight against it. This picture is a slap in their faces. The newspaper is delivered to my desk at work each morning. My co-workers felt the same way about the picture. We are all horrified that the Owatonna People’s Press would set aside their dignity and moral obligations to print something like this. While the message of the article was one of warning against the dangers or por- nography, most people will not get that message. They will just look at the picture and either be upset by it or tempted to look at more de- grading images. Either way, the image will be further desensitize people to images that exploit women. Heidi douglas Owatonna About your paper The Owatonna People’s Press is published daily Tuesday-Sunday. Business hours are 9 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday. Phone: (507) 451-2840 Fax: (507) 444-2382 Mail: 135 W. Pearl St. Owatonna, MN 55060 NEWSPAPER DELIVERY To start a subscription to the Owatonna People’s Press call 444-2360. Call 24 hours a d ay. Ask for EZ Pay-a money and time savi ng way to pay for your subscription. Through m onthly automatic withdraws, from your checki ng or savings account or applied to your cre dit card, you pay only $12.50 for carrier or $13. 50 for motor route delivery. Twelve Weeks carrier delivery rate for in town is $39.00. Motor route delivery is $42.50. Mail in County $44.50 per 12 weeks. If you do not receive your paper by 6:3 0 am Tuesday through Friday, call 507-444- 2361. Saturday and Sunday by 7:00 a.m. Hours: 7 am-5 pm Monday through Fri day or 7 am-10 am Saturday and Sunday. NEWS If you have a news tip, call the Edit orial department at 507-444-2379. Call 2 4 hours a day. Our fax number for press rel eases is 507-451-6020. Sports-available 4:0 0 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at 507-444-2374. 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The Owatonna People’s Press is a division of Huckle Media, LLC Front Desk................ 507-451-2 840 Publisher and Editor Ron Ensley............ 507-444-2367 rensley@owatonna.com Managing Editor Jeffrey Jackson..... 507-444-2371 jjackson@owatonna.com Advertising Director Debbie Ensley....... 507-444-2386 densley@owatonna.com Circulation Manager Carol Harvey......... 507-444-1561 charvey@owatonna.com Classifieds Classified .............. 507-444-239 7 classified@owatonna.com OPINION Online Poll Today’s results: Good decision 28% Bad decision 22% I don’t care 50% (109 votes) Today’s question: Do you plan on visiting Viking s training camp in Mankato? Votes can be cast at www.owaton na.com. Poll questions change each day at 6 p.m. Results reflect votes collected durin g a 24- hour period. Poll results do not represent a scientific sur vey. What do you think of the coun ty board’s decision for the Havana beltli ne? To say that the story “Inter- net XXX” that appeared on the front page in Wednesday’s paper was provocative is an understatement. Unfortunately, the reaction that the story pro- voked — or, more specifically , the reaction that the layout of the story provoked — was not what we intended. In hindsight — always 20-20 — it was the wrong decision. The layout that appeared in the print edition of the Owatonna People’s Press as well as in the print edition of one of our sister papers, the Waseca County News, not only featured the bold headline to the story, but also a picture of a man with his face buried in his hands. This is the man whose ongoing struggle with an addiction to pornography on the Internet is the focus of the story. However, what pro- voked most of the negative criticism we received was not the story itself, but rather the photographs at the bottom of the layout — photographs of three rather scantily clad young women with a black bar across their chests and the word “CENSORED” emblazoned on that black bar. Though we knew that the layout was bold and somewhat daring, we did not anticipate, as perhaps we should have, the depth of negative reaction that it would receive. Many of the readers who contacted the newspaper on Wednesday after the paper came out told us that they were deeply offended by the photos. Obviously, that was not our intent, and if the way in which the story was presented offended anyone, we deeply regret that and we apologize. If our intent was not to offend people, what then was our intent and how did we settle on the layout that appeared in print? These were the questions that came my way from read- ers on Wednesday — readers who believed they deserved an explanation. And they were right. They do deserve an ex- planation, and the questions do deserve an answer. Let me address the latter question first — the questio n of how we settled on the layout that appeared in print. The story, which had been in the works for several weeks, is a lengthy one to be certain and one that we knew we would be printing in the People’s Press because of the importance of the issue and because of the connection of the story to our city. Though the man mentioned in the story is from Waseca, he works at a factory in Owatonna. As it came time for us to print the story, four of us — two from our sister paper in Waseca and two from the People’s Press — had a telephone conference in which we discussed possible ways to present the story. And yes, one of the people who par- ticipated in the discussion was a woman, so this was not just a bunch of insensitive guys toss- ing around ideas. We discussed numerous options and looked at various layout models from other newspapers across the country to give us some ideas before coming to a consensus about the basic idea for what would eventually appear in print. At that point, we turned the layout itself over to the person on our staff who had the most experience designing front pages for the newspaper. Ini- tially, we imagined that there might be a photograph of just one woman at the bottom of the layout and that her image would be highly pixilated so as not to be overly graphic. However, when we tried that, the image came out so fuzzy that it would have looked like an error in the printing pro- cess. So instead, we opted for the clearer photographs of the women. After the layout design was completed, everyone who was involved in the initial dis- cussions about the layout had a chance to see and comment on it, with some tweaks of the design being made after hear- ing the comments. When the tweaks were made to every- one’s satisfaction, I gave the final approval to go ahead wit h the design. So why would I approve this layout? The question goes to intent. And the answers show that intent and reality unfortu- nately do not always mesh. Our intent was twofold. First, it was to attract readers to the story, to give them a pre- sentation on the page that was so bold and daring that they, in seeing it, would wonder what the story was all about and would want to read the story. Clearly, the layout of the story attracted attention. But rather than attracting them to the story, the photographs at the bottom of the layout actual- ly repelled some readers — so much, in fact, that several read- ers told us that they would not read the story because of the photographs associated with the story. Obviously, that was not what we had in mind. We write and publish stories that are meant to be meaningful and address important issues. This story, “Internet XXX,” was not only the story of one man’s struggle with an addiction to pornogra- phy, but with the larger issue of ready availability of pornog- raphy on the Internet and the medical issue of compulsive sexual behavior. Indeed, the story contained information about the warning signs of compulsive sexual behavior and the possible effects that such behavior can have on people. It is, we believe, an impor- tant issue, and if presenting the story the way in which we presented it kept people from reading it, then we obviously made a grave error and one that we regret. (I would add that the story without the offending photographs is available on our website, www.owatonna. com. ) Our second intent was to il- lustrate in a bold way the sort of images that might tempt a person to visit pornography sites on the Internet. The pho- tos that we used were actually stock photos and the young women pictured in the photos are wearing bathing suits. And, compared to the sort of pho- tographs that one can see on Internet pornography sites, the photos we used are quite tame and do not come close to the graphic images used on those Internet sites. Still, as some readers pointed out to us, by using the images that we used, we may have in- advertently done exactly the opposite of what we intended to do. Rather than cautioning readers about Internet pornog- raphy, we may have enticed people to visit those porno- graphic sites. As one reader put it in an e-mail addressed to me: “This issue of the paper, with this explicit picture, could be that ‘simple curiosity’ that firs t opens the door to pornography for someone. Think about it … this paper is delivered to many homes and places of business all over the area. There are young, impressionable boys who might get their first littl e glimpse of pornography with this picture. There are young girls who will have the idea fur- ther impressed into their minds that the only way to get atten- tion and be desirable is to look like that picture and to exploit their bodies. There are other people who will see the picture that are already struggling with the temptation of pornography and are doing their best to figh t against it. This picture is a slap in their faces.” (For a complete text of the letter, see below.) Perhaps that reader is cor- rect, though we hope not, for that clearly was not our intent. If the inclusion of those images had that effect, then we made a major miscalculation that we sincerely regret. The story itself is an impor- tant one because it addresses what seems to be a growing problem within our world — Internet pornography and the impact that it has on peo- ple’s lives. We can only hope that our way of presenting the story to our readers did not hin- der getting the content of that story out to our readers. And if our presentation of this story offended our readers, we are truly sorry. Jeffrey Jackson is the man- aging editor of the Owatonna People’s Press. He can be reached at 444-2371 or via e- mail at jjackson@owatonna. com. Intent and reality do not alway s mesh Jeffrey Jackson A4 It sounds like a recipe forgridlock. DFL Gov. Mark Daytonexpects tax increases to helpaddress the state’s $6.2 billiondeficit, but Republicans, whocontrol both houses in theLegislature, insist they cansolve the shortfall with cutsalone. “It’s almost a mirror oppo- site of the last two sessions,”said Rep. Tony Sertich, DFL-Chisholm, referring to similarstandoffs by a Democratic-controlled Legislature andformer Republican Gov. TimPawlenty. But Sertich is hopeful fora different conclusion. “Ideology can only takeyou so far,” he said of theRepublicans’ stance on thestate budget. “But after we hearfrom the public and see what the impacts of cuts are, I’mhoping we’ll see a more bal-anced approach to dealingwith the deficit.”Several Range legislatorspointed out that it is mathe-matically impossible for thestate to cut its way out of itsdeficit. “You could fire all 55,000state employees and you wouldonly be a third of the way toerasing the deficit,” said Sen.David Tomassoni, DFL- Chisholm. He added that thestate’s reserves have beendrained as well. “Pawlentyused it all. There are no potsof money hanging around forsomeone to pluck.”If Republicans insist ona cuts-only budget, it willsqueeze the middle class andresult in increases in proper-ty taxes and college tuition,warned Rep. Tom Anzelc, Johnson Controls, Inc. violatedstate law when it attempted to denyaccess to financial documentsreques ted by the Timber jayNewspapers that related to the ISD2142 facilities plan. That is the determination ofRyan Church, Acting Commissionerof the Department of Administrationfor the state of Minnesota, whoissued an advisory opinion on thematter on Monday. “This decision is a major victoryfor the public’s right to know,” saidTimberjay General Manager JodiSummit. “The documents in ques-tion were produced at public expensefor a public purpose and JohnsonControls never had any right to keepthem secret. This decision is invalu-able not only in this case but for futurerequests made by the media or citi-zens,” Summit added. The TimberjayNewspapers hadrequested the opinion back inOctober, after the school district andJCI failed to provide requested doc-uments. The school district main-tained that some of the requesteddocuments were not in its posses-sion, since JCI had not allowed thedistrict to keep some of the key finan-cial information. The documents requested bythe Timberjay included a masterspreadsheet detailing purportedsavings from the district’s restruc-turing plan as well as updated con-struction budgets and documentationfor invoices submitted to the districtby JCI. Under the Minnesota DataPractices Act, the Department ofAdministration is tasked with issuingadvisory opinions on disputes arisingover access to government infor-mation, which is why the matter cameto their attention. Shamus O’Meara, an attorneyfor JCI cited several reasons forattempting to deny the Timberjayaccess to the information, includingthat the information was proprietary.JCI had used a similar claim in orderto deny full access to the same mate-rials by school district officials.O’Meara also claimed the informa-tion could be used in possible liti-gation. In addition, O’Meara claimedthat since JCI is a private company,it is not subject to the state’s DataPractices Act. While that is gener-ally true, Commissioner Churchnoted that there are exceptions,including in cases where privatefirms contract with a governmententity and the information request-ed relates to the fulfillment of theircontract. If the governmental bodymaintains the information in ques- tion, the private company is notobligated to provide it. But in thecase of ISD 2142, JCI is obligatedbecause it had failed to provide thedistrict with most of the data in ques-tion. As such, s ta ted Church,“Johnson Controls did not complywith Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 13,when it denied access to data relatedto a contract JCI has entered into withIndependent School District 2142.”The determination is not legallybinding in itself, but courts arerequired to defer to the department’sopinions, which means media or cit-izens could use the opinion to obtaina court order to enforce it.In this case, the prospect of anadverse opinion did prompt JCI toprovide much of the informationrequested by the Timberjay, includ-ing the master spreadsheet detailingpurported savings. That spreadsheet,and the questionable numbers con-tained within it, will be examined indepth in upcoming stories in theTimberjay. But JCI would appear to remainin violation of the law in regards toa separate data request made lastsummer by the Coalition forCommunity Schools. At that time,JCI denied any and all requestedinformation on the grounds that it isa private company. That denial would now appear to be a separate viola-tion of the law. At the same time,JCI has yet to provide the Timberjaywith any requested documentationsupporting invoices submitted to thedistrict by JCI.In an emailed statement, JCIRegional Vice President and GMChris Schulken contends that thecompany has complied with theTimberjay’s request. “In 2010, JohnsonControls Inc. and the School Districtprovided the Timberjay with theinformation covered in the adviso-ry opinion. Johnson Controls willcontinue to assist the School Districtin responding to future requests forpublic data,” Schulken stated.While JCI has now compliedwith most of the Timberjay’s request,it has also engaged in inappropriateacts that appear intended to chillfuture requests, according to Summit.“Among the items we received fromJohnson Controls’ attorney was a billfor $3,900,” said Summit. “All foremailing us a handful of documentsthat the public paid for. It’s pureintimidation, meant to discourage thepublic from seeking access to impor-tant information.”Fortunately, noted Summit, theData Practices Act puts strict limitson what respondents can charge forsupplying such information to thepublic. “We’ll be paying for these documents as provided by law,” saidSummit. “We’re not going to be kow-towing to those who try to abuse theprocess.” While the commissioner’sdetermination applies primarily toJCI, it also took issue with the schooldistrict’s handling of the relevant data.“As a f i na l no t e , ” wro t eCommissioner Church, “the Districtmust create and maintain records thatdocument its official activities.” Summit agreed. “By failing todemand these documents from JCI,the district failed in its obligation touphold the public’s right to accessthis material. We hope that the dis-trict will take this to heart and requireall documents currently held by JCIbe immediately provided to the dis-trict.” In a written statement providedby School District SuperintendentCharles Rick, the district contendsthat it has lived up to its obligationsto keep appropriate records and dis-agreed with the Timberjay’s inter-pretation of the determination. Ricknotes in the statement that the dis-trict’s attorney did request that JCIcomply with the Timberjay’s requestfor documents, to the degree that itwas able. GOP Legislature, DFL governor still leaves taxes front and center in St. Paul Political shifts, same old impasse TIMBERJAY Newspapers January 8, 2011 3Ruling: JCI must provide documents See Legislature...page 5 by TOM KLEIN Cook-Orr Editor by MARSHALL HELMBERGERManaging Editor PUBLIC’S RIGHT TO KNOW READ the Timberjay! 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  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 60 The theme for “Category X” rotates annually, and is chosen by MNA’s Journalism Education Committee. For the 2010-2011 BNC Contest, entrants were asked to submit their best continuing coverage of diversity in their communities. This award is pre- sented to newspapers that demonstrate thorough and illuminat- ing coverage, and newspaper involvement, on local community diversity issues. Category X Weeklies up to 2,500–5 entries First Place: Blaine-Spring Lake Park Life Bullying Impacts All This was an excellent topic for a multi-edition series. The author does a great job of exposing the readers to several facets of the bullying problem. Additionally, the continuity in graphic style throughout the series is well done. Second Place: Blooming Prairie Times Save the K-9 Series The type of story every reader loves—a boy and his dog. A wonderful job showing the relationship, as well as the benefit the K-9 unit provides. Weeklies over 2,500–3 entries First Place: Detroit Lakes Tribune Diversity in Becker County Sharing stories of your community is one thing; sharing who they are is another. Excellent presentation. Second Place: Thisweek Farmington/Lakeville Fasting with Intent Telling more about something or somebody few know about is what a good newspaper does. Nice work. www.abcnewspapers.com 763-421-4444 Friday, Oct. 29, 2010 Page 11A Right: End the Hate an- ti-bully event organiz- ers pose Oct. 20 inside the Riverdale Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar. As guests entered the restaurant they were given an opportu- nity to buy an “End the Hate” T-shirt, demon- strating their desire to put an end to bullying, particularly anti-gay bullying. Pictured here are (left-right) Tammy Aaberg, Jolie Bialke, Jason Kesler (super- visor of Boston’s at Riverdale) and Kristin Maas. Photos by Sue Austreng by Sue Austreng Staff writer Tears welling up in her clear blue eyes, Tammy Aaberg spoke of how “ev - eryone came to (her son Justin) and told him how they were being bullied . He listened and he would make them feel better.” What she didn’t learn until after he took his own life this past July was tha t Justin was also the victim of vicious bullying. “I was aware of one in- cident, but I had no idea how horrible it was,” Tam - my said. “I want Justin’s legacy to be that he’s the last gay child to take his life be - cause of bullying. To en - sure that what happened to my son doesn’t happen to other students... that’s why I’m here.” Justin, an Anoka High School student who cam e out to his mother as be - ing gay when he was jus t 13 years old, was the vic - tim of anti-gay bullying , Tammy said. After his death, Justin’s friends told his mothe r he’d been a frequent tar - get of bullies mocking hi s sexual orientation. “He kept that all in, though. He was alway s there to help his friends , make them feel better, bu t he never said anything to me about being bullied, ” Tammy said. And now she’s out to stop bullying. She’s gon e before the Anoka-Henne - pin School Board, asking it to make a change to th e school district’s sexual ori - entation neutrality policy . She’s rallied support and spoken to gay student s and their families. She’ s established a foundation in Justin’s memory. And on Oct. 20, the day of a nationwide movemen t called Day of Remem - brance, Tammy stopped by Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar in Riverdale , where an End the Hat e event was staged. End the Hate organiz- ers sold purple T-shirt s and did what they could to get the anti-bullying mes - sage out to all who would listen. “We’re doing this to make a show against bully - ing. To show that we’re no t going to tolerate this any more,” said Jolie Bialke , one of the event organiz - ers. “We’re doing this to end the hate, turn the hate into something positive.” Daisy Johnson, who stopped by Boston’s with her husband and littl e girl, said, “It’s importan t to have an environmen t where everybody can fee l safe. (We’re) all about pub - lic safety and we should provide that for everyone.” Justin Anderson, a graduate of Blaine High School who said he also endured anti-gay bullying while in high school, cam e to the End the Hate even t at Boston’s “to help end the hate.” “I’m hoping it makes more people motivated to do something,” he said. A portion of the pro- ceeds from the End th e Hate event at Boston’s in Riverdale goes to the Jus - tin Aaberg memorial fund , RIP Justin Norman Aa - berg Foundation at TCF Bank. Another portion goes to the Trevor Project, “th e leading national organiza - tion focused on crisis and suicide prevention effort s among lesbian, gay, bisex - ual, transgender and ques - tioning (LGBTQ) youth, ” as described on its websit e (www.thetrevorproject . org). Sue Austreng is at sue. austreng@ecm-inc.com Anti-bully websites, resources, helplines Stop Bullying Now! offers tips from the U.S. Dep art- ment of Health and Hum an Services on how to iden tify and prevent bullying; w ww. stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov . Stop Bullying: Speak Up offers online resources for parents and kids; www.s top- bullyingspeakup.com. The Anti-Defamation League offers tips for p ar- ents and resources for tea ch- ers; www.adl.org/combat bul- lying. WiredSafety provides tips for teens on how to sa fely navigate the Internet and for parents to keep track of t heir child’s web-based activi ties; www.wiredsafety.org. Pacer’s National Center for Bullying Prevention i s a child-advocacy group foc us- ing on children with disa bili- ties and offers anti-bull ying materials; www.pacer. org/ bullying; KidsAgainstBu lly- ing.org. GLSEN, the Gay Les- bian Straight Educat ion Network, offers support for schools to implement a nti- bullying programs; w ww. glsen.org/bullying. To learn more about sui- cide prevention – includ ing warning signs of suicide and depression – visit www.s ave. org or www.take5tosaveli ves. org or call 1-800-SUICIDE (1- 800-784-2433). Bullying by the numbers National statistics on bullying include: • One out of four kids are bullied. • One out of fi ve kids admits to being a bully. • Eight percent of stu- dents miss one day of class per month for fear of bullies. • More youth vio- lence occurs on school grounds as opposed to on the way to school. • Every seven minutes a child is bullied. • With bullying, adult intervention ranks at 4 percent; peer interven- tion at 11 percent; and no intervention at 85 percent. • 43 percent of students fear harassment in the bathroom at school. • Approximately 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month. • Name-calling, rumors and threatening to harm someone are the top forms of bullying. • 79 percent of bullying happens in the schools. • 99 percent of bullying happens in the school building or outside on school grounds. (Source: http://stopbul- lyingnow.hrsa.gov) by Sue Austreng Staff writer Lately, bullying and its tragic consequences have been all over the news. It seems every time you turn on television news , open a magazine or read a newspaper there’s anothe r report. Truth is, bullies have been around forever – why , even back in Bible times , Joseph’s brothers ripped off his clothes, threw him into the pit and then sold him into slavery. But, tragically, it seems children’s response to bul - lying has taken a fatal turn . During the past year, seven current or forme r Anoka-Hennepin student s have taken their own live s after facing bullying and harassment. Those suicides were the bullied students’ desperate attempt to escape the pain of being bullied. What is bullying? Who are its victims? Why is i t so prevalent? What are the signs your child might be being bullied? What are the signs your child might be a bully? How can we make it stop? And what can be done to help these chil - dren? All these questions and more will be explored in the coming weeks with ABC Newspapers’ bullying series, appearing on these pages over the next three months. The series, which will appear on alternating weeks, will include histori - cal reports of bullying in and around the schools in the Anoka-Hennepin, St . Francis and Spring Lake Park districts. It will examine what makes for a successful anti - bullying campaign in the schools. We’ll look at how schools are raising aware - ness of bullying and in - creasing vigilance agains t attacks. And we’ll profi le a for- mer bully and a recovered victim of bullying. Sue Austreng is at sue. austreng@ecm-inc.com By SUE AUSTRENG Staff Writer By SUE AUSTRENG Staff Writer Anti-bully EVENT Left: Terra Aaberg shows her aunt, Tammy Aaberg, the custom lettering she had put on her “End the Hate” T-shirt. Terra’s cousin (Tam- my’s son) Justin Aa- berg committed sui- cide in July. Tammy believes that “anti- gay bullying had a hand in Justin’s sui- cide,” she said. Left: Visitors to the Riverdale Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar Oct. 20 were greeted with purple balloons and given an opportunity to purchase a purple “End the Hate” T- shirt during the six- hour anti-bullying event staged there. Proceeds from the event were given to the Trevor Project and to the RIP Jus- tin Norman Aaberg Foundation at TCF Bank fund. A lot of people have a g ood idea of what bullying is because they see it every day. According to Webster’s D ictionary, a bully is “a blustering, quarrelso me, overbearing person who habitually ba dgers and intimi- dates smaller or weaker people.” Bullying can include: • Punching, shoving, and other physical acts • Spreading rumors • Excluding others from a “ group” • Teasing in any form • Getting people to “gang u p” on others Bullying also can happen online or electron- ically. Cyberbullying is wh en a bully uses the internet, mobile phones or other technology to reach out. This can inc lude: • Sending text, email, or ins tant messages • Posting pictures or mess ages about oth- ers in blogs or on website s • Using someone else’s use r name to spread rumors or lies about som eone (Source: www.stopbull yingnow.hrsa.gov/ kids) At ABC Newspapers we ’re always looking for input from our reade rs regarding story ideas, sources, backgroun d informtaion and opinion. We want to hear f rom you, our read- ers in the community. Co ntact us by phone (763-421-4444), email (p eter.bodley@ecm- inc.com), visit our websi te at abcnewspa- pers.com or send us a me ssage through our fan page on Facebook or Twitter account (@ abcnewspapers). bul•ly (bool’e) n., pl. -lies , v., -lied, -lying, adj., int erj. VOLUME 103, NO. 46 • WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 • DETROIT LAKES, MN NEWSSTAND $1.00 • 3 SECTIONS Forecast High:30 Low:13 SUNDAY Slight chance of snow Becker County’s #1 News Website www.dl-online.com High:25 Low:25 SATURDAY Slight chance of snow High:31 Low:12 FRIDAY Blustery High:28 Low:24 THURSDAY Partly sunny High:31 Low:15 TODAY Chance of flurries FE AT U R E Alternative medicine Medical practitioners use non-traditional procedures to curetheir patients’ ailments. Page 1C IN S ID E Recycled clothesSharon Trieglaff Jons recycles old,used things and creates useful newitems. Her work will be on display atthe Holmes Art Show. Page 7A Informing Becker County for over 100 years BY BRIAN BASHAMbbasham@dlnewspapers.com Take a drive on the countryroads between Frazee and WolfLake and you might come acrossa scene out of the turn of thecentury — the 20th Century, thatis. A small, black, single horse-drawn buggy moves slowly alongthe road. The distinctive look isthat of the Amish.The Amish in Becker Countyhave been here for three years.About half of the members ofthe community came fromMichigan, where the Amish com-munity was shrinking due tohigh land prices and proximityto a city that was growing. Theother half came from Wisconsin.“We decided to move furtherwest just to get away from the ur-banization of Michigan,” an eld-er of the Amish community eastof Frazee said. “We looked allover Iowa and Minnesota and wefound this, and we liked this thebest.” The Becker County Amishare a private people who don’twish to have close-up picturestaken of themselves or individ-ual publicity, therefore, theychose to remain anonymous.The first three Amish familiesmoved to Becker County in thespring of 2007, with several moremoving that fall. “Every year since then, sev-eral more families have moved,”the elder said. The Amish community isspread out about five miles eastof Frazee to the Toad Lake area.“We like small farming ar-eas. We like broken land becausethe big farmers are at a disad-vantage. And we like to see itabout a quarter to half timbered because we burn wood and get alot out of our wood lots,” the eld-er said. Another consideration oftheir location was the proximityto the train and bus lines, whichthe Amish use to visit relativesand other communities.Moving to Minnesota fromMichigan wasn’t as big a prob-lem for the elder’s family as onemight think. Since they weremoving to a smaller house, anauction was held where many ofthe extra items were sold — about a semi load. After the auc-tion, there were still two semis ofbelongings and a horse trailerwith four horses that weremoved for the family. There wereseveral buggies, a hay mower,wagons and a sawmill that tookup half of a semi. When a family moves, the en-tire community and surround-ing communities gather togeth-er to help pack. Two semis wereloaded in one day in Michiganthen unloaded in a day in Min-nesota. The process of unloading wasn’t that easy for the first fewfamilies who moved here. Theyhad to unload all of their be-longings nearly by themselves.There is a constant push formore land for the Amish com-munity because they tend tohave big families, the elder said.One reason the Amish movedfrom Wisconsin was lack of goodland for sale. “You need more land all thetime to keep everybody on thefarm, which we consider by farto be the most desirable place tolive — on a farm,” the elder said.The Becker County Amishhave a small school near the in-tersection of County Road 22and County Road 39. The schoolis a converted house, moved tothe current location from nearToad Lake. According to the eld-er, the school is already full.“Eventually, we’ll have a sec-ond school as the communitygrows,” he said. Amish children go to schoolfor eight years, learning the usu-al reading, writing and arith-metic skills. German is taught asa second language one afternoonper week, but school is taught en-tirely in English. The Amish na-tive language is a dialect of Ger-man, and their Bibles are writtenin German, so it is a necessarylanguage for the children tolearn. In the Amish community,women are secondary to men,but are not abused or sub-servient to men. But, they workjust as hard as an Amish man.“Somebody has got to be incharge, and God chose the man,”the elder’s wife said.“There’s a lot of cooperation,”the elder said. “Amish women BRIAN BASHAM/TRIBUNE SEVERAL AMISH MEN construct a dairy barn along Rethwisch Road east of Frazee earlier this summer. The Amish community in Becker County stretches east of Frazee for about five miles between County Road 31 and the Toad Lake area. Several families migrated here from Michi- gan and Wisconsin in the spring of 2007. Several more families have moved to Becker County each year since. BRIAN BASHAM/TRIBUNE AN AMISH BUGGY heads east on County Road 22 east of Frazee. The Amish are very private people who don’t wish to have close-up photographs taken. REEP VS. KOHLER No charges in Lake Eunice investigation BY NATHAN BOWEnbowe@dlnewspapers.com After an investigation into al-legations against members ofthe Lake Eunice TownshipBoard, it was determined that —while they may have brokensome laws — it was not done in-tentionally and no criminalcharges should be filed.The Becker County Sheriff ’sDepartment investigated and theClay County Attorney’s Officemade the decision not to presscharges. Becker County referredthe matter to Clay County forroutine conflict of interest rea-sons. Lloyd Kohler, an elderly LakeEunice Town Board member,was accused of performing workfor the township, billing thetownship, and then being paidfor the work, in violation ofstate law that says “a supervisoror town board must not be aparty to, or be directly or indi-rectly interested in, a contractmade or payment voted by thetown board.” He plowed roads and did oth-er work for the township.“After reviewing all informa-tion provided, it would appearthat Mr. Kohler had no intentionof breaking the law and insteadbelieved he was assisting the Jacob and Jordan Ehnertsolve math problems during theCallaway Boys & Girls Club“Power Hour,” where kids need todo an activity using their brains. TOWNSHIP to page 14A ➤ AMISH to page 16A ➤ CALLAWAY NOW OPEN Boys & Girls clubs have 7 units in WE BY NATHAN BOWEnbowe@dlnewspapers.com A remodeled Boys and GirlsClub in Callaway is now open,and will serve more than 100youngsters in a 15-mile radius.The club opened in the formerManitok wild rice building,which years ago used to be a lum-beryard, said Tim Reiplinger,chief professional officer of theBoys and Girls Clubs of theWhite Earth Reservation.“We remodeled the first andsecond floor of the building andturned it into our Boys and GirlsClub,” he said. In the future, the club mayalso renovate the third andfourth floors and possibly thegarage area to better serve thekids, he added. It’s part of a Boys and GirlsClub expansion that has grownto include seven sites on theWhite Earth Reservation sincethe first Boys and Girls Clubwas founded in Naytahwaushin 2002. CLUBS to page 14A ➤ BY RIHAM FESHIRrfeshir@dlnewspapers.com The online classifieds serviceCraigslist is a place where buy-ers and sellers get an opportu-nity to advertise their itemsfree of charge. But it’s also a place wheresome scam artists can easilyfind victims. The Becker County Sheriff ’sOffice received at least two re-ports of Craigslist scams lastweek, and one of them wasn’t asmuch about wiring money as itwas an uncomfortable situa-tion. Michelle Prindle of Callawaysaid her daughter was lookingfor speakers to buy online andthought to look on Craigslistfor a good deal. The ad stated to text the sell-er if interested. So the teen did. A few minutes later, she re-ceived a call from an unfamiliarnumber with the voice of amale, in his late teens or early20s, not only inquiring about thepurchase but also asking somepersonal and inappropriatequestions, Prindle said. FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS COME WITH A PRICECraigslist scams SCAMS to page 14A ➤ BY VICKI GERDESvgerdes@dlnewspapers.com The Lake Park-AudubonSchool Board got some goodnews, and some that was not sogood, in the form of the 2009-10District Audit Report presentedat Monday night’s regular meet-ing in Audubon. Brian Stavenger of Eide Bail-ly presented the audit report,which was prepared for the dis-trict by the Fargo-based firm.Stavenger noted that the dis-trict received a “clean, unquali-fied opinion,” which basicallyamounts to a positive review. “It means our process of ac-counting is positive —we’re do-ing the right things,” explainedSuperintendent Dale Hogie in alater interview. Overall, the district’s financesare in pretty good shape, headded. “Our general fund balancefor the end of (fiscal year) 2010was $420,990,” said Hogie.The general fund is the sourceof funding for most district pro-grams, he explained.There were a few areas of STATE GIMMICKS PUT LP-A BUDGET IN THE VISE Feeling the squeeze LP-A to page 16A ➤ A D S ➤Nereson, Pick aTurkey Sale: page16A ➤Boys & Girls ThriftStore Sale: page 6B ➤Norby’s ThanksgivingSale: page 3A FAMILIES MIGRATING FROM MICHIGAN, WISCONSINThe Amish in Becker County
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 61  All Dailies–7 entries First Place: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead Cultures in Conflict Tackling a subject like diversity isn’t easy. Second Place: Faribault Daily News Somali strengthening ties A well-written series that investigates the challenges faced by the growing immigrant community, especially Somalis, in Southern Minnesota. While the changing face of their community is one that’s probably been noticed many of the paper’s readers, the series gives them a chance to see the situation from the other side. The series effectively and succinctly describes some of the challenges from culturally to linguistic - facing these new residents. It also doesn’t shy away from focusing on how government choices have made the integration of these immigrants into the community more difficult. Asking difficult questions, and noting challenges and to some degree fault on both sides, is what newspapers need to-especially in emotionally- charged topics like integration and discrimination. This series does that. All Newspapers–6 entries First Place: The Free Press, Mankato Delayed, Deferred and Deadly: The long wait for a four-lane highway 14 This is a powerful news series that moved a neglected community, its state representatives and state officials into action to save lives. Through its leadership, The Free Press clearly sparked a fire among those who hold the power to do something to actually take steps to improve a deadly highway. Staff produced a top-notch, informative, eye-opening report that is clearly deserving of this Community Leadership Award. Beautiful job. Second Place: St. Cloud Times 11 Steps to Wellness in 2011 Another series devoted to saving lives, but in a different way. Staff at the St. Cloud Times should be commended for devoting its time, energy, print space and a web presence to help guide and steer readers to a healthier life. A nice leadership initiative that I hope plenty of residents took advantage of. It’s like having a personal trainer delivered to your home. Nice job. Lynn Smith Community Leadership Kristen M. Daum kdaum@forumcomm.com FARGO – The Syria that Hassan and Mayla Ghazi remem ber from their youth is a far cry from the Middle East nation th at’s made headlines in recent mont hs. Hassan, now 79, and M ayla, 71, each recalled a stable, “ very nice” upbringing in their hom etown of Aleppo in northeastern S yria. But now, the Fargo coupl e watch- es the news and sees the ir country torn apart by a viol ent clash between anti-governmen t protest- ers and the longstandin g military regime. “It’s really sad,” Mayla said. “It wasn’t like that before.” Syria gained its indep endence from France after World War II. Copyright 2011 The Fo rum Births.......................... A4 Business......................A9 Classifieds ............ C4-10 Comics ...................... B3 Contact us.................. A2 Crosswords .............. C10 Lottery numbers ........ A2 Metro/State ............ C1-3 Nation/World ........ A3-10 Obituaries................ A4-5 Opinion ...................... C2 Sports .................... D1-4 Life .......................... B1-4 Weather...................... A2 Inside Cool weather and an overcast sk y can’t keep crowds from enjoying some down-home cooking Wednesday at Fargo’s RibFest. See story, Page C1 69° 48° Today’s weather � � Partly cloudy Details, A2 ForumThe of Fargo-Moorhead David Samson / The Forum From left, Justin Hayward , John Lodge and Graem e Edge of the Moody Blues perfor m Wednesday at the Bluestem Cen ter for the Arts in south Moorhead be fore a record 2,354 fans. Moody Bluestem Senate rejects delay on ‘s wipe fee’ cap By Alan Fram Associated Press WASHINGTON – Mer - chants triumphed o ver bankers in a battle for bil- lions Wednesday as the S en- ate voted to let the Fede ral Reserve curb the fees t hat stores pay financial insti tu- tions when a custom er swipes a debit card. It was murkier, howeve r, whether the nation’s c on- sumers were winners or losers. As a result of the roll cal l, the Fed will be allowed to issue final rules on July 21 trimming the average 44 cents that banks charge for each debit card trans ac- tion. That fee, typically 1 to 2 percent of each purcha se, produces $16 billion in annual revenue for ban ks and credit card compani es, the Fed estimates. The central bank has pro - posed capping the so-cal led interchange fee at 12 cen ts, though the final plan co uld change slightly. Victorious merchant s said the lowered f ees should let them dr op prices, banks said th ey could be forced to bo ost charges for things l ike checking accounts to ma ke up for lost earnings a nd each side challenged the other’s claims. Consum er groups were not a uni ted front, either: While the c on- sumer group U.S. PIRG s aid consumers would bene fit, the Consumer Federat ion of America took no form al stance but said it was c on- cerned about what b oth industries might do. Travis B. Plunkett, th e consumer federation’s l eg- islative director, said the amount of savings t hat stores pass on to c on- sumers would depend on how competitive their m ar- kets are. He said he a lso worried that the Fed’s c ur- rent proposal might be too restrictive, which mi ght tempt banks to “use that as an excuse to incre ase charges on customers th ey value the least, low- to m od- erate-income customers. ” In Wednesday’s vote, sen - ators trying to thwart the Fed’s rules needed 60 vo tes to prevail but fell six vo tes short, 54-45. How they voted The Senate voted on legislation that would have halted pending federal regulations to limit swipe fees. A “yes” vote is a vote to delay the regulations. � North Dakota: Sen. John Hoeven-R (“yes”); Sen. Ken Conrad-D (“no”). � Minnesota: Sen. Amy Klobuchar-D (“no”); Sen. Al Franken-D (“no”). By David G. Savage McClatchy Newspapers ATLANTA – A panel of t hree federal judges indicated they ma y be prepared to declare at least part of last year’s health care law unconst itutional, toss- ing a barrage of skeptic al questions at a top Obama administra tion lawyer. The judges in Wednesd ay’s hearing here did not state plainly that they will overturn the law, but all three inquired – more than once – about whether the law’s requirement that nearly everyone buy insurance by 2014 could be struck down while the rest of the law is upheld. The questions suggested at a minimum that the judges were thinking hard about declaring the mandate unconsti- tutional. “I can’t find any case like this,” said Chief Judge Joel Dubina of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. “If we uphold this, are there a ny limits” on the power of the federal government? Judge Stanley Marcus appeared to agree. “I can’t find any case” in the past where the courts up held “telling a private person they are compelled to purchase a product in th e open market. ... Is there anything that suggests Con- gress can do this?” That question is at the heart of the constitutional challenge to the health Judges challenge health reform SPORTS D1 Fargo South pitcher Er nst taken in 47th round of MLB draft by Chicago Final edition Thursda y, June 9, 2011 102,000 readers every day FROM BRUIN TO CUB VOTE: Page A8 Hassan and Mayla Ghazi, 79 and 71, respectively, have been in the U.S. for more than 50 years. They come from the same hometown in Syria. Dave Wallis The Forum Not the Syria they remem berHEALTH CARE: Back Page Judge Joel Dubina 11th Circuit Court of Appeals “If we uphold this, are there any limits” on the power of the federal government? Couple recall growing up in country much different tha n it is now DAY 1 OF 5: The Ghazis� GHAZIS: Back Page “Cultures in Conflict” is a six-part series publishing in The Forum an d Inforum.com. During the first five days of the series, we’ll introduce you to loca l residents who were born in coun tries around the globe that face social unrest, political change or cultural conflict. They come from Syria, Kurdistan Iraq, Burundi, Nepal and Somalia. Each shared with The Forum the ir unique tale of their homeland and their transition to America and Fa rgo- Moorhead. While their experiences are distin ct, some similarities weave their sto ries together. We invited each of these individuals to participate in a roundtable discussion about international and cultural issues , as a way to shed light on topics we do n’t often discuss here in the upper G reat Plains. That conversation will be chronic led for the sixth, and final, installmen t of this series. Read the stories each day in The Forum – and check out Inforum. com for extra content, including videos of each interview and an interactive map. � Today: Hassan and Mayla Ghaz i of Syria � Friday: Newzad Brifki of Kurdistan Iraq � Saturday: Laetitia Mizero of Burundi � Sunday: Prashanta Bahadur Singh of Nepal � Monday: Fowzia Adde of Somalia � Tuesday: Roundtable discussio n about “Cultures in Conflict” A b ou t th is s er ie s Veteran English rock group breaks out the classics By John Lamb jlamb@forumcomm.com MOORHEAD – The Mo ody Blues weren’t going t o let some un-summery wea ther get in their way of pla ying Wednesday night’s sho w at the Bluestem Center fo r the Arts in Moorhead. With temps hovering arou nd 60 degrees, the English rock group that’s been togethe r for nearly 50 years got the c rowd on its feet before launc hing into their 1981 hit “The Vo ice.” While the windy weat her prevented the group from using a video screen sho wing photo montages and se rving as a backdrop for a light show, some of the 2,354 fans – a Bluestem record – didn’t seem to mind the focus on the music, standing and dan cing for popular songs like “ Tues- day Afternoon,” “I K now You’re Out There Somewh ere” and a rollicking versio n of “The Story in Your E yes,” which capped off the firs t set. Read the full concert rev iew on Page A6. Inforum searchword: music Readers can reach Forum rep orter John Lamb at (701) 241-553 3 Coverage mandate at heart of debate Merchants say move to low er prices, but banks say ch arges could go up September 12, 2010 www.mankatofreepress .com 40 pages Volume 124, No. 161 $1.75 S E RV I N G M A N K AT O A N D S O U T H - C E N T R A L M I N N E S O TA Inaugural event a smash ... Page B1 SPORTS, PAGE D1 Mavericks hold off Northern State S U N D AY WEATHER, PAGE D8 Does it get better? Sunny with a high of 76. Clear tonight. Low around 50. TOMORROW IN THE FREE PRESS Graif thriving Men’s clothing store owner has seen city center come full circle. We want your photos Do you have a photo you wo uld like to share with everyone? Now you can become part of The Free Press by sending th ose photos to us to include in our new Web fe ature, “My Perspective.” Send your phot o to readerpho- tos@mankatofreepress.com. Photos will appear on our “My Perspecti ve” slide show at www.mankatofreepress.com/ photos_videos. Include a title in the subject line and a brief description (including the ph otographer’s name). One photo per e-mail , please. Mankato, Minnesota Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F 1-F4 Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2 Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . C 5-C7 Nation-World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A3 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D 1-D7 TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E 7, E8 Your Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . C 1-C4 Copyright 2010,The Free Press Co. NATION & WORLD, PAGE A3 Unsettled nation marks 9/11 UPCOMING PAGEFINDER By Robb Murray rmurray@mankatofreepress.com MANKATO — Blue Earth County authorities broke their silence on the Lake Crystal homicide Saturday, revealing a few new details about the case not included in court documents filed Friday. Jennifer Nibbe, who was charged Friday with second- degree murder, was arrested in the parking lot of her employer, the Mankato Surgery Center, authorities said. She had not, however, turned herself in. She will make her first court appear- ance Monday. Authorities also said James Nibbe, who was shot in the head while he slept, was aware of the insurance policy his wife had pur- chased in the event of his death. No other arrests are imminent, and authorities do not suspect Nibbe’s son had any involvement. Investigators were at the Nibbes’ home until Wednesday. Capt. Rich Murry said they pulled a lot of physical evidence from the house and will have it analyzed by the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Murry said he expects it to take weeks before the analysis is complete. “This is not done by a long shot,” Murry said. “There’s lots of work to be done.” Among the evidence is more than a dozen fin- gerprints, gunshot residue samples taken from Jennifer Nibbe, DNA swabs from Jennifer Nibbe, knife, rope, shotgun shells, shotgun, bloodspatter samples, cell phone, spiral notebook, hair samples. Jennifer Nibbe made a frantic 911 call Aug. 31 say- ing her husband had been Eagle Lake Janesville Waseca Nicollet Courtland New Ulm N 14 14 14 14 2000 - 1 2001 - 4 2002 - 1 2003 - 2 2004 - 3 2005 - 1 2006 - 1 2007 - 3 2008 - 5 2009 - 1 2010 - 3 Highway 14 fatalities New Ulm to Waseca from 2000 to 2010 J. MalmangerS ource: MN Dot/MN State Patrol By Mark Fischenich mf ischenich@mankatofreepress.com It’s somewhere north of 11,0 00, the number of trips Bryan Cl ancy has taken on Highway 14 bet ween New Ulm and North Mankat o. One 25-mile eastbound drive in the morning, a westbound re turn in the afternoon. “I live on Highway 14,” Clan cy said. “I kind of call it the Buf falo Trail. It’s just a slow-moving path.” Trying to change that for the last several decades have bee n local leaders, state lawmaker s, members of Congress. Dozen s have come and gone, all pled ging to make Highway 14 funding a top priority, but 24 miles of the p ath between North Mankato and New Ulm remains two lanes. In recent years, that two-lane Frustrated legislators run into MnDOT roadblock By Mark Fischenich mf ischenich@mankatofreepress.com MANKATO — After decade s of beg- ging, advocates for an unbro ken stretch of four-lane expressw ay from New Ulm to Rochester tried bellicosity during the 2010 legislative se ssion. Imploring the Minnesota Department of Transportatio n to put the project on its constructio n sched- ule hadn’t worked, so lawma kers along the Highway 14 corridor trie d order- ing MnDOT to do it. “I don’t prefer this type of ap proach for funding projects, but I be lieve this has become our only choice,” said Sen. Kathy Sheran, DFL-Mankato , in explaining her bill to the Sen ate Transportation Committee o n March 11. “... My constituents don’t accept the solution that gives MnDO T the DECADE OF DEATH John Cross Bryan Clancy has been driving h is 18-wheeler on Highway 14 bet ween New Ulm and North Manka to twice daily for more than two decades. During that time, he’s witnessed countless accidents on the increasingly b usy road and fruitless attempts to get it expanded to fo ur lanes. H ighway 14 has a fatal accident rate 94 percent higher than the state average. There have been 25 fatalities on the mostly two-lane road in the last decade from New Ul m to Waseca. Still, it did not make the Mn DOT list for work anytime in the next 20 years, while safer roads are scheduled for im- provements simply because they meet MnDOT priorities of preservation and reducing co ngestion. Some people are trying to ch ange that. Please see TRUCKS, Page A7 Please see MNDOT, Page A6 More trucks, more traff ic make road more dangerous A SPECIAL REPORT Highway 14 motorists have been waiting years for safe ty improvements Jennifer Nibbe to make fir st court appearance Mond ay; no other arrests immin entPress conference provides more deta ils on homicide investigation Please see INVESTIGATION, Page A6
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 62 College: General Excellence–7 entries Typography and Design–3 entries First Place: Echo, Rochester Community & Technical College An understated, elegant publication with a strong sense of community and strong editorial voice about issues close to home and on a larger scale. Second Place: The Lions’ Roar, Normandale Community College, Bloomington A very bold presentation with the best use of visuals in the contest. This judge is sad to see they no longer a print edition, but the quality reporting should continue online. Honorable Mention: The Record, College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University, Collegeville A very newsy broadsheet with solid writing and visual reporting throughout. Very strong local and relevant advertising. Special Recognition of Excellence: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas Contest judges were very impressed with the General Excellence en- try submitted by ThreeSixty Journalism, a special program for high school student journalists based at the University of St. Thomas, and wanted to give it special recognition in the awards program. Journalism today demands innovation. And that is what ThreeSi- xty brings. Not only is it a unique collaborative project, but it is also excellent storytelling - in text and visuals. The student journalists in- volved with this publication have put together a group of stories about who we are and what we do in a way that compels you to keep turning the page. Bravo. First Place: The Lions’ Roar, Normandale Community College, Bloomington Very bold design, strong use of photography. Innovative typography that really helps to create a vibrant feeling. Second Place: Echo, Rochester Community & Technical College Very understated and elegant design that works for the reader.
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 63  In this age of homeopath- ic revival and psuedoscience, it has become more important than ever to focus on the ideas that brought us to our current levels of understanding about the world: rationality and skepticism. Let me preface this by stating that I have no qualms with beliefs in the privacy of one’s own home or in the streets of cities. I believe that actions taken by people to do what they think is right is their right as a citizens of our great nation, however different from my beliefs they may be. It is important to recognize, however, how the actions of a few impact the lives of many, especially in the intercon- nected and media rich world we live in today. Skepticism and rational- ity have recently been used as curse words, wielded against the people that think differ- ently than others when it comes to religious beliefs, specifically fundamentalist Christians against the New Atheist movement that has sought to remove a perceived religious influence from the government and politics of these United States, as well as around the world. It is time for us to move away from the idea that skepticism shall only be rel- egated to the duty of fighting the unwinnable war against religious belief, and towards the idea that we may all work together to remove the ideas that plague all of our people, no matter who may be watch- ing over us or not. The hydras of pseudosci- ence and homeopathy run rich in our history as a species, mostly by charlatans of “natu- ral” remedies that use large words describing non-existent ideas primarily to those of little education or wealth. Recently, there has been an outburst of these “natu- ral” remedies in the general public, even among those who are well educated. While it may be true that these remedies are “natural” in some sense of the word, they are no more a remedy than drinking hot soup to heal a broken leg. The worst and most un- desirable effect of this revival is the appearance of homeo- pathic remedies on pharmacy shelves, a place that was once reserved for cures that had been tested and proven to be effective by the scientific method. Homeopathy is the idea that through dilution of a sol- vent in water, those who have fallen ill can be made well again by drinking the solution. While this idea may sound reasonable, through our lens of skepticism, we are able to see that it is in fact false and it is only the placebo effect that has taken hold. For example, a medicine may be placed in water and reduced to less than ten per- cent ratio of medicine to wa- ter ratio, for the homeopath believes that the more diluted the substance, the more effec- tive the “remedy.” This defies the laws of common sense in every way. Take common drinking water. Now imagine everything that water has come into contact with ever since its introduction to the water cycle millions of years ago. Wouldn’t illness have been wiped out by now due to the dilution ratio of the billions of substances in the water being so incredibly low? Remembering my state- ment before of respecting beliefs until they encroach on the health of others, I proceed to my next point, and biggest beef with practitioners of alternative medicine such as homeopathy; advising against the use of vaccinations. Vaccinations for every in- dividual are an important part of how we live today, espe- cially due to our close quarters and social lifestyles. This is because of the herd immunity theory, or the idea that chains of infection can be broken by individuals in the community developing a resistance to the illness (what a vaccine does). The alternative medicine and popular media crowds have been spreading untruths about vaccines like they lead to autism, allergies, multiple sclerosis or sudden infant death syndrome, all of which are false. This has led to parents to being reluctant to getting their children vaccinated and has led to a surge in cases of measles, the number of cases rising to 152 cases across the USA just this year from 75 cases for the entire year of 2010. If we are not careful, the spread of lies and pseudosci- ence can take over and demol- ish what we have become as a people through scientific inquiry. In short, get yourself and your children vaccinated, buy some real medicine and really think about what the people around you say. Your life may depend on it. Discrimination with new smoking policy Opinions University Chronicle - Page 3 Sunday, July 3, 2011 As August approaches, I cannot help but notice how many SCSU stu- dents smoke. These students are being discriminated against. By definition discrimination means: treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit; the process by which two stimuli differing in some aspect are responded to differently; the quality or power of finely distinguishing and the act, practice, or an instance of dis- criminating categorically rather than individually. Tobacco users are being catego- rized into a specific group and the non-tobacco users are being favored by restricting the use of tobacco on campus. The University and the govern- ment are taking away individual rights of the American people. I understand the harm smoking or chewing tobacco can have on a person but that is their prerogative, they know the risks and chose to take them. Other people take risks with their lives on a daily basis and we don’t tell them they cannot do it. Skydiving, rock climbing, scuba diving and swimming in the ocean can all be dangerous and we do not outlaw these activities. Some critics comment on the effect of second hand smoke. First off, smoking outside is not go- ing to kill someone 5o feet away. Second, if someone is bothered by the smoke in a certain area due to a person smoking the person can choose to leave, but the majority of the time they just sit there and complain about the situation without doing anything about it. As for previous smoking legisla- tion such as not smoking with children in a vehicle, the government is once again telling parents how to raise their children. If one is concerned about the health of children then the govern- ment should limit the amount of junk food parents allow their children to consume. They should create menus that parents must follow to provide a well-balanced diet for their children, create a schedule for physical activity and limit the amount of TV children watch. But the government hasn’t done that because parents are “allowed” to raise their children the way they see fit . As for the current policy going to be in effect on the SCSU campus, the University is telling the thousands of students that call SCSU home (stu- dents that live on campus) that they are not allowed to smoke in or around their home. The United States has always considered the man’s home his castle or a woman’s home her castle, hence why we have laws in effect for people to defend their homes. At the same time these students cannot use tobacco in or around their home but are able to defend it with deadly force? This to me is discrimination. Smok- ers are becoming the most discrimi- nated group of people in the country today. Summer stinks Homeopathy is dangerous Advertisers must choose message more carefu lly The opinions expressed on the Opinions page are not necessarily those of the col- lege, university system or student body. Kyra Loch columnist It is common knowledge that people are affected and influenced greatly by advertising. While most advertisements just try to promote their product on consumers, some can cause more damage. Certain advertisements can be harmful and impressionable on people; this is why advertisers should think of the impact of their messages instead of just trying to encourage consumers to purchase their product. Yoplait yogurt has recently agreed to pull one of their more recent commercials that the National Eating Disorders Association claims promotes behaviors of an eating disorder. In the commercial, a woman is at the fridge staring at a cheesecake. We hear her bargaining with herself over whether she can have a slice. She is coming up with reasons and agreements in order to allow herself to eat the cheesecake, such as she has been “good” that day, or maybe if she eats a small slice and eats celery afterwards the calories will somehow cancel each other out. Another woman walks up and grabs a cheesecake-flavored yogurt that happens to be sitting next to the actual cheesecake. The first woman mentions the second one has lost weight, and guiltily grabs a yogurt as well. While Yoplait has agreed to pull the ad, they have other commercials that are very similar that promote the same eating disorder habits. There are at least two more commercials where the subject eating or choosing the “unhealthy” food is made to feel guilty and shamed into grabbing the yogurt instead, while the other subject boasts about losing weight. Showing these thought patterns and behaviors that are usually as- sociated with eating disorders when advertising what is seemingly a “healthy” food product should not be used in advertisements. By portraying a woman agoniz- ing over a piece of cheesecake or other dessert and making excuses about eating it, the commercial shows women this is common behavior when they are trying to make healthy decisions. It is not the way to promote healthy eating, especially when the product one is advertising is not that healthy. Yogurt is a healthier option com- pared to most other snacks; however, when sugar and other artificial flavors are added to it to make it taste like cheesecake and other desserts, it makes it more on the unhealthy side. While trying to promote a healthy snack that causes weight loss, they are actually promoting some- thing that is almost as unhealthy as the dessert they are comparing it to. Advertisers are aware of how impressionable they can be on consumers, but they may be causing more harm then they think. They should be more careful with how they choose to promote their products. Chris Bremseth columnist Christian Bursch sports & fitness editor Summer is often thought of fondly by most Minnesotans, especially during the winter on those cold February mornings when it takes ten minutes to scrape the ice off the windows of the car. Recently, however, day- dreams of pleasantly warm summer days have turned into a nightmare due to the heat wave in central Min- nesota last week. The high tempera- tures, which reached the 90s for a few day s, were a helpful reminder of why fall and winter are much better times of the year. The following are all of the reasons summ er is mostly just annoying and the second worst season (no one really likes spring, as it is barely a season and the refore automati- cally in last place). A car becomes a very dangerous place dur ing a hot summer day. Remember playing the hot la va game as a child, where you couldn’t touch the groun d because it was made of lava? That just happened in your car; every metal, plastic, leather, pleather thing turns to hot lava. Especially beware of the seat belt buckles, accidentally sitting on one is an unpleasant experience . The steering wheel can get a little too hot to handle, so those gloves you have left in your back s eat from winter may actually be useful. Oven mitts are a g ood alternative. Oven gloves are an even better alternative . Another annoying thing that happens in s ummer that many ladies will be able to sympathize wit h is when the back of legs stick to a leather seat. Wherever shorts, skirts, or dresses can be f ound, there too will be a thigh sticking to a restaurant booth seat. Peeling a thigh off a seat usually isn’t too t errible unless you are unlucky enough to also be sufferin g from sunburn. Sunburn is an evil instrument of self tortu re. It is easy to avoid by simply putting on some sunscr een, but the draw to get a tan often outweighs the logic of making a good decision. Many times people turn a nice shade of lo bster, but it should turn into a tan someday, right? When sunburn strikes it makes you feel m uch warmer than you probably already were. This can heighten sweat- ing and not wanting to touch anyone, a fe w other things that are an issue in the summer. Sweating is gross. There are many varietie s of sweating, often depending on the area where the sw eat derives from or the amount. Someone once said, “Girls don’t sweat, th ey glisten.” That statement is false. That person has o bviously not been around a college dormitory in the su mmer that has no air conditioning. Sweating can be smelly and wet, which ar en’t exactly attractive qualities. This leads me to my next point: it is not as nice to touch people during the summer. In winter, nothing is better than getting co zy with a significant other. But in the humid sum mer months being close to another body just gets too hot som etimes and not in a good way. There are several other things about summ er that make it the worst season: bugs, bug bites, ice cre am melting so fast that you can’t enjoy it, humidity, havin g to shave your legs all the time, and the list goes on. But perhaps the most annoying thing abou t summer is it marks the end of the fiscal year for a Minnesota state government that can’t seem to get its act t ogether. Quote of the Day “Nothing gold can stay.” Robert Frost Hannah Swift AssociAte editor Use of Photography as a Whole–2 entries Editorial Page as a Whole–1 entry First Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University Interesting takes on big issues. Thought provoking topics alongside lighter topics made these pages fun to read. First Place: Echo, Rochester Community & Technical College Nice campus news-centered approach to reporting. Well-rounded, consistent writing and reporting. Second Place: The Lions’ Roar, Normandale Community College, Bloomington Good coverage of a wide variety of subjects both on- and off-campus. Stories are well written and relevant. First Place: UMD Statesman, University of Minnesota, Duluth Good use of photos in the newspaper from headshots to high-action sports photos. Images enhance the readers’ experience. Second Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University A nice variety of photos that punctuate the stories in the newspaper. Some particularly strong sports shots. First Place: The Lions’ Roar, Normandale Community College, Bloomington Some very clever headlines - “Tuition so high it might overdose,” for example. Overall, good job! Second Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University Consistent, succinct headlines. Easy to read. Very reader friendly. General Reporting–4 entries Headline Writing–2 entries UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DULUTH THE STATESMAN WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010 WWW.UMDSTATESMAN.COM INDEX: News: A1 - A4 | Stu dent Life: A5 | Sports: B1 - B2 | The 5ecti on: B4 | Opinion: B6 STUDENT LIFE THE 5ECTION SPORTS NEWS B2 Trimester system could relieve busy schedules A look into Chester Creeks Cafe’s Wine Bar B4 OPINION B6 Largest selection of tobacc o products & accessories. LO WEST PRICES GUARANTEED. BY HOLLY NELSON nels5805@d.umn.edu UMD lost Joe Michela on Sat- urday, Nov. 6. The late Director of Auxiliary Services made many positive changes on this campus that we all benefit from every day. Having been here for longer than any chancellor, Michela has un- doubtedly left a significant and permanent mark, or more precise- ly, a paw print, here at UMD. “Joe loved coming here,” said Mike Esler, Michela’s longtime friend and current Facilities Oper- ations and Parking Maintenance Supervisor. He loved it here so much in fact that when he came to UMD for his undergraduate de- gree in 1968, he never left. It was during this time that he met Esler and John Brostrom, friends from his undergraduate time spent at UMD, both that turned out to be lifelong friend- ships and coworkers in the Auxil- iary Services department. Brostrom was Michela’s resi- dent advisor during his freshmen year. Currently, Brostrom is the Senior Administrative Director of Auxiliary Services. Esler and Michela, on the other hand, met when he was the Alpha Phi Omega President. “Joe made our department a family,” Esler said. He was always concerned with how their families were doing and that they were tak- ing care of themselves, he said. While many people regarded him as having a gruff exterior, Brostrom referred to Michela as a teddy bear with a “gigantic heart of gold”. In fact, whenever the daycare children would walk past Mi- chela’s office, they always had to make a special stop to see him. It was not uncommon to see Mi- chela playing with the youngsters in his office or receiving big hugs from them before they left. Everything Michela did, he did for others, said friends Esler and Brostom. Whether it was for his family, friends, coworkers, the community, or even neighbors he volunteered as caregivers for, his hard work was always done with others in mind. “He was also willing to make the tough calls,” Brostom said. It was this willingness to make the tough calls for the better- ment of UMD and his extraordi- nary vision that made him such a successful businessman. For example, due to all of Michela’s hard work, the bookstore and the UMD food service program are both owned and run by the uni- versity. In fact, UMD is the only university in the U of M system to maintain complete ownership of their food services department. In addition, he established the senior renter program in the summer in which senior citizens, usually from Arizona, Florida, or Texas, stay in our on-campus housing facilities for the summer and pay rent. Michela saw this as an opportunity to make student housing prices more affordable due to the fact that students would no longer have to pay for summer maintenance. “I don’t think anyone put more of their life and effort into this uni- versity than Joe did,” Esler said. As noted by his friends, Michela worked tirelessly for the univer- sity, doing what it took to make it a better place for the UMD students he cared so much about. Not only was he intricate in the renovations of Kirby Plaza, the food court, the bookstore, and the childcare cen- ter, but he was also involved with the construction of Stadium, Oak- land, Junction, Goldfine, Heaney, and many areas of Griggs. Addi- tionally, Michela and Brostrom were the original creators of the current bus hub and the DTA U- Pass; both things that many of us use on a daily basis to get to school and around Duluth. Not only did Michela leave us with many remarkable building additions and programs on cam- pus that exist as testaments to his Remembering a true Bulldog BY FATIMA JAWAID jawa0007@d.umn.edu The life and times of your average UMD Civil Engineering students have changed drastically. Two years ago, the major didn’t even exist. There were no labs that they could experiment in and classrooms they could call thier own. All of that has changed. “We’ve been given so much,” said Chris Bruhn, fourth-year student and president of the Civil Engineering club. “It’s the best going from being totally scattered to having a place that is completely ours.” This semester marks the first official year that the new two story, $15 million Civil Engineer- ing building is open for use. The building con- struction began in fall 2008 and was finished earlier this year, according to the department’s website. The Leadership in Energy and Environmen- tal Design (LEED) certified building houses the program’s administrative offices, classrooms, as well as six state of the art laboratories. The building also features a 24-hour lab that each Civil Engineering student is given a key card to gain access to, Bruhn said. “Beforehand, we basically couldn’t do any- thing - any of the hands-on stuff,” Bruhn said. “We just had no means of doing it.” The department has fully moved into the new building according to Andrea Schokker, head of the Civil Engineering program. “The building is fabulous. It’s a very well- designed space,” Schokker said. “It’s such a wonderful atmosphere. The building itself is a great teaching tool. For instance, most of the beams and columns are exposed instead of be- ing hidden behind drywall. That means we can show the students in their design classes what the things they are designing really look like up close.” Bruhn said that spending hours on end in the building, sometimes pulling four plus hours in one room alone, doesn’t really bother him. He said that it is super comfortable and all the rooms are really ergonomic. The building houses all of Bruhn’s classes, and at this point, he really has no reason to go anywhere else in the university. “Well, no, I’ll occasionally leave for food,” he said. “All of us are at the point where we’re basi- cally treating [school] as a full time job.” Bruhn said that the additions to his program are contributing to a completely different mind- set. “It’s now a place I want to be during the day,” Bruhn said. “As a freshman I hated going to classes, it was always a struggle. But now, it’s completely different. I want to go. It’s a privelege and I’m really thankful for that.” Hands on engineering BY ALICIA LEBENS lebe0051@d.umn.edu The Board of Regents announced last Friday the selection of Dr. Eric W. Kaler as the sole fi- nalist in the search for University President, re- placing current President Robert H. Bruininks in June 2011. Kaler is an alumnus of the University of Min- nesota where he earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 1982. He is currently Provost & Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and Vice President for Brookhaven Affairs at Stony Brook University, where he co-manages Brookhaven National Laboratory. Earlier this last week, names of four semi- finalists where put forward to the board for consideration. Two of the candidates had with- drawn from consideration, leaving Kaler and one other, who remains unnamed. Kaler was the only one invited to the Twin Cities campus for public interviews by the Board of Regents. Kaler will be at the Twin Cities Campus on Nov. 17 and 18 to meet with student lead- ers, faculty, administrators and alumni from all branches of the University system. Chelsey Doepner, UMD student representa- tive to the Board of Regents, is excited for the chance to be a part of the selection. “He looks great on paper,” Doepner said. “Strong resume with strong experience.” Doepner thinks it’s unfortunate that Kaler is the only candidate left for consideration, but believes that the board will select a good candi- date. “Just because there is only one candidate doesn’t mean that the regents won’t look closely at Kaler,” Doepner said. “President Bruininks wasn’t even on the list of candidates when he was selected.” Victor de Meireles, Student Association Pres- ident, is also looking at Kaler’s credentials. “I am curious to hear his thoughts on how he would address some of the pressing issues re- lated to the University of Minnesota including managing decreasing state funding,” de Meire- les said. “Also how he plans to work with the coordinate campuses and extension services throughout the state.” Regents announce presidential fi nalist RACHEL KRAFT/STATESMAN Civil Engineering students Adam Johns on (right) and Teddy Berg (left) simulat e land erosion. Civil Engineering students take advantage of new building’s features MIKE ESLER/SUBMITTED see MICHELA, A3 Free concert raises both money and spirits A3 Fashionista dons the same pair of shorts for a week A5 International Club hosts smorgasbord “Taste of UMD” offers over 50 dishes. A3 Walt “Zamboni Man” Bruley ends career at the DECC Men’s Hockey finishes 5-3 over Huskies B1
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 64 www.msureporter.com Min nesota State University, Mankato Thursday, March 3, 2011 Voices .............................6 World & Nation .............10 Study Break ..................12 Sports ...........................13 Arts & Entertainment ...18 Classified ......................23 iNSidEiNdEX MSU STUdENT LiVES A LiFE OF GiViNG, AiMS TO BUiLd SCHOOLS iN NATiVE SiERRA LEONE ANd PAY FOR iTS CHiL dREN’S EdUCATiON (2) KiNG’S SPEECH SPEAKS VOLUMES (3) CONSTRUCTiON ON NEW dORM BEGiNS SATUR dAY (4) THE Kid’S TAKE GRAdES THE MiNNESOTA TW iNS’ OFFSEASON (15) PHOTO STORY: ANNUAL GENdER BENdER PAC KS OSTRANdER (11) A&E CELEBRATES dR. SEUSS’ BiRTHdAY, diSC USSES FESTiVALS (18/21) Follow this. @natebrennan facebook.com/ msureporter @kyle_ratke @msureporter @elenashufelt @megankadlec GoodMorning Mankato.com MSUReporter.com Snow storms cause wrangled roadsters University officials say parking issue is a proximity problem NATE BRENNAN editor in chief Snow storm / page 7 By the time traveling members of our community arrived in their cars to the Minnesota State Mankato campus on the morning of February 21, they quickly realized parking wasn’t going to be easy. With nearly 10 inches of snowfall hitting Mankato between the previous Saturday night and that Monday morning, and just two pay loaders and a small crew to move it, the university was in a tight spot in its attempt to prepare the parking lots for Monday classes. Citing a lack of time and equipment, only two purple lots (20-21) could be cleared. With the University of Minnesota and surrounding school districts canceling classes, officials faced the decision whether to even open campus at all. “What happens in the morning is campus security gives me a call at about [4 a.m.] and they tell me what the road conditions are like, what the weather conditions are like, what the state patrol and local police say about the roads,” said Warren Sandmann, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs. “And then they tell me what our campus road crew says about the state of campus, and at that point, then we make the call whether or not to cancel classes.” “We don’t get to make the call about closing the university. Only the president and the chancellor of the system get to close the university, but we make the call whether or not classes will take place,” Sandmann said. The decision was made to go forth with classes, but allow for students, staff and faculty members to make their own decisions about traveling to campus. Then at 1:32 p.m., the announcement was made by Sandmann’s office to cancel all night classes. So why didn’t Mr. Sandmann bring Mavericks a dream, and make it the full snow day that they’ve rarely seen? “When security called, they said that the road conditions were difficult and I checked that out with MNDOT as well, too, but that plows were going out and roads were passable,” Sandmann said. “The campus crew said that they had been working through the night and were hopeful to get the lots open. Obviously, they did not get all the lots open [in time that morning], and so students, faculty and staff were having troubles getting in (and out of) the lots.” “The other reason we generally are fairly reluctant to cancel classes is that the majority of our students live on campus or within walking distance,” Sandmann said. “We know that’s kind of unfair for those who commute, it makes it tough for them when the weather conditions are hard out there, but we do try and serve all of our students, too.” “I’m not surprised that it wasn’t canceled. As a future educator, I’d probably do the same thing, but at least they canceled night classes,” said Minnesota State Student Association President Tom Williams. “I drove down from the cities and [Highway] 169 was terrible. From here to St. Peter on down wasn’t too bad, but from Le Seur to St. Peter along that open prairie there the wind was just gushing, flying across the road. There were parts where you just couldn’t see in front of you because the weather was so bad.” They say hindsight is 20/20 and university officials will keep that in consideration when future issues such as this arise. CORRECTION: A March 1 article indicated that Tim W alz would be attending the Dan and Verona Burt on Dinner on March 5, when he, in fact, will not be. A press release for the event and the accompanying so urce mistakenly identified Walz as an attendee of the b anquet. The Reporter apologizes for for the misinfo rmation. The Minnesota State Student Association passed a motion to pay $150,000 out of student fees for fiscal year 2012 to staff the existing outdoor climbing wall and ropes course, and a proposed indoor climbing wall in Myers Field House. The climbing wall would come pending the approval of a proposal from campus recreation in response to the $3 million dollar reinvestment fund being provided by the university and indication of student interest. The $150,000 is intended to go to staffing the walls with a full-time director, three graduate assistants from the Adventure Education Program and hourly student workers. “If we can utilize those experienced education graduate assistants who have some background and experience in running walls and courses it would create a natural tie between the academic and student affairs office to recruit the top people in the country,” said Director of Campus Recreation Todd Pfingsten, who is responsible for the proposal. The Adventure Education Program, part of the College of Education, is currently in charge of Rock climbing wall possibility for MSU AVERY CROPP staff writer Climbing / page 7 MSU basketball holds on page 16 Website–5 entries Best Advertisement–1 entry First Place: MSU Reporter, Minnesota State University, Mankato A strong range of display advertising that should be of interest to this audience. First Place: MSU Reporter, Minnesota State University, Mankato Great site! I love the design, it definitely shows appeal for a younger eye while remaining professional and relevant for all news seekers. very well done! Second Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University Good, clean layout, easy to navigate and chock full of interesting stories. Honorable Mention, The Lions’ Roar, Normandale Community College, Bloomington Very clean design. Especially like access to event calendar and prompts to follow the Lions’ Roar on social media sites. First Place: The Record, College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University, Collegeville, Jason Kaiser Readers meet technology Love this ad! Love the clean graphics and timeline emphasis, could easily see this running in a large metro. Advertising Excellence–1 entry
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 65  Social Issues Story–17 entries First Place: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Mary Meehan When a parent has cancer it attacks the whole family The best lead of the group. Grabbed my attention from the get-go and then flowed very well to the end of the story. Second Place: UMD Statesman, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Alex Korte Global student finds education at UMD A story filled with very strong quotes which made for a strong profile of an unusual student. Honorable Mention: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Grace Pastoor School board candidate’s campaign manager doesn’t have high school diploma An overall interesting portrait of a unique young man. First Place: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Grace Pastoor Young men are the group most likely to be shot in Minnesota Good reporting, clearly based on good advising. Good job. Second Place: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Ariel Nash Divide to conquer achievement gap Well-written story on an interesting topic. A story that should be told! Honorable Mention: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Jason Tham Islamic Awareness week addresses issues facing St. Cloud Muslims Good recap of the events held and experts tapped for the weeklong event. Good use of sources/quotes. Human Interest Story–16 entries
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 66 First Place: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Kelly Schueler Sports and concussions, is it worth the risk? A well-executed anecdotal lead flowed into a well-reported, two- source story. Second Place: UMD Statesman, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Matt Busch The rise and fall of the Maroon Loon A thorough report from the perspective of the “Loons.” Lots of quotes help put this story in context. Honorable Mention: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, David Gustafson Quidditch no longer a fictional game, now real-life “muggles” can play A solid report on a quirky event. Story was well reported, however it was a bit stiff. This of all stories is one to have fun with. First Place: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Olivia Deans It’s the law: no more tattoos for minors Interesting topic, lede draws in the reader. Good job adding a variety of voices and sources to the story. Second Place: ThreeSixty Journalism, University of St. Thomas, Asma Adam Despite setbacks, businesses stay ‘green’ Very strong writing. Timely topic -- “green” business is a popular and important topic, these days. Interesting story. Honorable Mention: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Samantha South Tio’s to open doors Informative profile of a new business set to open near campus, one that will definitely appeal to your readers. Sports Story–8 entries Business Story–4 entries
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest Page 67  First Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Molly Willms ‘Reefer Madness’ to infect St. Cloud What a fun review. It really draws the reader into the concept and unusual nature of the show. Second Place: MSU Reporter, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Nate Brennan Featured Performer: Chastity Brown An excellent review of this performer’s music with an interesting ad- dition on her background and influences. Honorable Mention: The Column, Northwestern College, Roseville, Amy Overgaard Tarnish&Gold gallery seeks to support local artists Good profile of a new art gallery, run by alums of the school. Good use of quotes to help tell the story. First Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Michael Runyon SCSU to stay open Excellent coverage of an obviously important topic for students and staff. Second Place: The Lions’ Roar, Normandale Community College, Bloomington, Steve Dodds U of M vice president named new chancellor of MnSCU system Good, informative piece on the new incoming chancellor. Well writ- ten and easy to read. Honorable Mention: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Christian Bursch Tobacco ban referendum vote passed by students Good hard news piece. Clearly written. Breaks down a potentially confusing issue. Arts and Entertainment Story–11 entries Molly Willms MANAGING edItor Sex, violence, hallucinations, coarse langu age and much more can be seen in Curtain Call’s 2011 p roduction about “the true public enemy number one”: “Reefer Madness: The Musi- cal.” Based upon the 2005 Showtime movie “R eefer Madness: The Movie Musical,” the story actually ge ts its start from a real 1936 propaganda film released to pare nts to warn them about the dangers of this “new drug menace,” th is “violent narcotic,” this “unspeakable scourge.” “It’s just a really hilarious view, overdone, overacting, every- thing is done really cheesy,” said Erika Bo rden, director of the production. Curtain Call Community Theater got its s tart in Annandale, MInn. seven years ago. They moved to St. Cloud five years ago and have done a yearly show at Pioneer P lace ever since. Curtain Call tries each year to do a produ ction that some- how pushes the limits of controversy. “We’ve been trying to make it into more o f a young adult to adult theater, since there’s already a rea lly good children’s theater in town,” Borden said. “So we do things that are a little more controversial.” The original film, first titled “Tell Your Children,” depicts the various alleged effects of marijuana: it begins with uncon- trollable laughter, and ends with a young w oman being shot and another jumping out a window to her death, all thanks to “demon marihuana.” “Obviously it’s a remake of the 30s movie ,” said Josh Smith, who plays Jimmy in this production, “but the 30s movie was meant to be taken seriously, where the mu sical is just all in fun and totally having a good time and poking fun at how overdra- matic people were in the 30s about mariju ana.” The 2005 story follows young couple Mar y Lane and Jimmy Harper as they are each snared into the w orld of weed, meeting new people, hanging out at drug houses, h allucinating, experi- menting with sex and sadomasochism and becoming violent. “This show has some really sexy elements to it,” Smith said. “It’s kind of dirty in a way, but it’s not gro tesque or anything.” Borden said the idea to do this show came from a former cast member. “Every year, during the shows, I sit down w ith our current cast and ask them what they’re interested in doing, what they really want to do next time,” Borden said. “It was something that a big group of people that I know use d to watch, it’s been one of our favorite movies.” The show fits into Curtain Call’s missio n, which is to generally appeal to a younger audience an d push the limits of acceptability. “When the paper has done an article on u s there’s been positive and negative reactions to it, and th at’s exactly what we’re looking for,” Borden said. “Somethi ng that not every- body’s gonna really understand and get in to, but something that’s not really around here.” Borden said Curtain Call also exists to pro vide new acting opportunities for young actors in the comm unity. “It’s just a really great experience to see th is young adult theater,” Borden said. “There’s opportuni ties for people that age that’s not a children’s production.” Though last year’s production, “Sweeney Todd,” dealt with the subject of murder, Smith says this year ’s production is even more controversial. “This one is a little more taboo, I think,” S mith said. “There’s some scenes that are dramaticall y sexy.” The show is, according to Borden and Sm ith, made for col- lege students. “We base it around that young adult age, t hat college age,” Borden said. “Our youngest is 17, and he’ s the only one under the age of 18, and our oldest is 29.” “When you see the play, you’re going to b e able to see how much work the actors have put into it, wit h the singing and the dancing, with how good the show’s going to be,” Smith said. This outrageous comedic musical will run Thursday- Saturday July 15-31 at 7:30 p.m. and Sund ays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $17 for adults and $14 for students an d seniors and can be purchased through the show’s venue, Pion eer Place on Fifth. Jason Tham MovIe revIew “Transformers 3: Dark of the Moon” is more eye-candy for those who love to indulge in Michael Bay and Steven Spiel- berg’s heavy metal visuals and sound effects. People say third time is the charm. This third sequel of “Transformers” continued the battle between Autobots and Decepti- cons with much conflict, cruel fights an d a sexy girlfriend. Since the Decepticons decided to take over planet Earth to rebuild their Cyber- tron (an alien planet where the transform- ers were once ‘gods’), the human race now plays an important role in the middle of this robotic battle field. Yet, the two-and-a-half-hour plot of “Transformers 3” isn’t as compelling as th e previous films’. Audiences are shown that humans (in fact, even Autobots) can betray their own packs in the name of “freeing the race.” The role of Fox is dropped and re- placed with Sam Witwicky’s (as played by Shia LaBeuof) new love interest, played by English model Rosie Huntington-Whiteley . She did try hard to appear as seductive as , if not sexier than, Megan Fox. It was interesting, though, that the landing on the moon historic incident was incorporated into the storyline, even mak- ing it a part of the title of the series. Besides, sports cars lovers shall also expect even more advanced cars in this sequel, like the hot red Ferrari 458 Italia and a not-so-shabby blue Mercedes-Benz E-Class. As Michael Bay tries to blow things up, the scenes where the Autobots and Decep - ticons battled – with those sky-scrappers collapsing left and right – were worth the ticket to simply enjoy the defined detai ls and extraordinary audios in the theatre. Let’s just say audience should look forward to the Blu-ray version of “Transformers 3 .” The thin, indifferent scripts of “Trans- formers 3” come to a conclusion when the Autobots finally kicked the ass of Dece p- tions, and stopped the invasion of Cyber- tron to planet Earth. One good value that audience can take away from the movie is that one should never give up or turn their back on their own race. As shown by the playboy accoun- tant Dylan Gould (as played by Patrick Dempsey) and the ancient Autobot Sentin el Prime, betrayers never ended up staying alive. Hence, teaching us to stay loyal and faithful to our own pack. Overall, “Transformer 3” is a great production to pleasure the sensory organs but may not be as successful when it come s to its feeble scripts and plot. ‘Reefer Madness’ to infect St. Cloud Marquee Page 4 - University Chronicle Sunday, July 10, 2011 phoTo CourTeSY of MovIeg ooDS.CoM ‘Reefer Madness: The Musical’ bor rows lines from the 1936 propaganda film of the same title for an outrageous satire. Jun-Kai Teoh tech coluMN There’s MySpace, Bebo, Friendster, Hi5, Facebook and a swarm of other social net - works out there. Even in an overcrowded Olympic-sized pool, Google took a dive and started their own social networking service. Simply the fact that Google+ (read Googl e Plus) is run by internet mogul Google mak es it worthy of a mention. Now that we’ve given it a mention, how- ever, is it worth diving in and exploring? first things first, google+ is right now in closed beta and is invitation only. Some in di- viduals at the University Chronicle manag ed to get our hands on a handful of invites (n ot as an organization, mind you). With that being said, Google+ is actually rather nice to use right off the bat. It’s got a simple and clean interface, and it has an in tui- tive feel. That doesn’t make it special, but it cer- tainly makes it a pleasure to use. What Google+ tries to set itself apart is by using this concept called “Circles.” Essen- tially a way to group and divide your frien ds/ acquaintances into separate “Circles,” it a lso allows you to easily share content speci fically. True, those that have dug into Facebook might find the same function as well, b ut what sets Google+ aside from Facebook is the e ase of use. With Google+, it’s simply a drag a nd drop function. The “main page”, “dashboard” or “stream” of Google+ is divided in that ma n- ner as well. While it’s similar to Facebook with the way it shows posts (a vertical stream), a small sidebar to the left lets you easily fi lter streams from specific Circles. Facebook has faced a lot of criticism for the way it shares user information, and th at’s a concern with any social network. Howev er, a brief glance through Google’s privacy p olicy finds this: Google only shares personal informatio n with other companies or individuals outsid e of Google in the following limited circumstan ces: “We have your consent. We require opt-in consent for the sharing of any sensi tive personal information.” Now, there are probably exceptions and whatnot if it’s dug into deeper, but it certa inly encourages more confidence that faceb ook’s:- “… you grant us a non-exclusive, trans- ferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, world- wide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (“ IP License”).” Google+ is only in beta, there’s always the possibility that the Terms and Conditi ons might change in due time. It happened wi th Facebook, it could happen with Google+. Another thing that sets Google+ apart from others is its potential integration into the entire “Google Ecology.” Already, Google+ uses Picasa as its photo service. For those concerned about photo rights, specifically photos being stolen a nd sold when it’s put online, Picasa’s known for ha ving rather strict and fair policies. And the integration between Google+ and Picasa is seamless and pleasant. While that’s as far as integration goes righ t now, there’s a lot of potential for Google t o tap into here. Off the top, here are a few services/apps that Google provides. Blogger Gmail Google Earth/Maps Youtube Google Reader, Shopper, Music, Books Google Calendar and Google Docs Those are just a few more popularly used services (we didn’t include Google Search because, really?) Android phone users already have the ben - efit of a fleshed out phone app to use a s well. While it’s still very new, it’s certainly got potential. Whether or not it’s realized will be a different story. After all, we all remembe r Google Wave. If you don’t... well, you see my point. There is however a key difference, for those of you Facebook users thinking of ju mp- ing over. Google+ does not let you post/comment on other people’s “walls.” Commenting on what they’ve posted is fine though. on top of that, a small but very signifi cant feature is the ability to edit “posts.” Made a typo? Just edit it. Also, just as Facebook released their video chat function (yeah, just this past week) wi th Skype as its partner, Google+ has somethi ng similar as well. Called the “Hangout,” it functions similar to a video chatroom. It can be restricted to circles, to having one-on-one conversation s, to large conferences, it’s really flexible. Comes packed with webcam support and ,believe it or not, Youtube. So that’s another step towards further integration. Google+ is not the bee’s knees yet, but it could very well be. Especially with the wh ole plethora of services Google could integrat e it with. But it’s a rather encouraging start from Google. And if there’s ever a company to take Facebook on, it’s probably Google. visit us at www.universitychronicle.net if you’re interested in your own Google+ inv ite. REVIEWS.movie.game.album.book.theater. ‘Transformers’ lacks in plot, compensates with effects Taking a gander at new social network Google+ phoTo CourTeSY of fIlMofI lIA.CoM ‘Dark of the Moon’ is a tradition al Michael Bay action-driven film with a weak plot and stunning effects. rAtING: Local Breaking News Coverage–4 entries Volume 88, Number 5 University Chronicle Serving SCSU and the St. Cloud CommunitySunday, June 26, 2011 WWW.UNIVERSITYCHRONICLE.NET INSIDE News..............1-2 Opinions.......3-4 Marquee........5-6 Sports..........7-8 Lemonade Art Fair MMA a lifestyle Thousands gather for art fair on SCSU campus despite inclement weather. Jeramy Lang explains his life with MMA and the difficulties in training.. Page 8 Page 5 Stormchasers: ‘rainy day people’ Page 8 Steve Rindelaub SCSU to stay open Michael Runyon News editor There are many groups on campus that work in the field. One group in particular’s field is storms. The SCSU Storm-chaser Club spends most of the summer analyzing, predict-ing and chasing storms. Katie Klarkowski, the president of the Stormchaser Club, said that the main goal of the club is to educate, add-ing “You can’t be trained on how to be a stormchaser; you learn by experience.” The chasers spend a lot of their time predicting and analyzing weather patterns. Most of their time spent on the actual chase involves getting to the site of the storm.Klarkowski said, “You can eat three square meals a day of McDonald’s. Sometimes the air conditioning doesn’t work and you always take the risk that you can blue-sky bust, which means the storms don’t pop. You’re not going to see dozens of storms in a day. It’s very expensive in gas and there’s a lot of stress.” “When you see the tornadoes and the structure of the storm, it makes it all worth it.” The Stormchaser Club uses member’s vehicles and equipment when they’re on the chase. Nicholas Corbett, the treasurer, has used his vehicle in nearly every chase.“I’ve purchased all the equipment for my vehicle,” Cor-bett said. “I have a ham radio that allows me to talk to spot-ters over a much greater distance than other service. I have a CB for my car, a dashboard camera and video camera. I also have a still camera. I’ve put a lot of money into it.”The chasers act as on-site reporters when they arrive at the storm. They will report if they see a funnel cloud, a wall cloud or broken tree limbs to the National Weather Service.Klarkowski said that spotters are important because the radar gives limited information. She said that spotters will report information that provokes a warning from the weather service. Photo Courtesy of SCSU Storm Chasers Group members study the cloud formations while chasing a storm in Nebraska “Forecasters also make calls to verify what is happening,” Klarkowski added, “They take what a trained spotter’s seeing more seriously than the public. What we call ‘scary looking clouds’, people will sometimes report them as tornadoes or funnel clouds. Spotters can determine the difference.”Safety is very important for the chasers. They will gener-ally stay a safe distance away from any funnel clouds they see.Corbett said, “There’s a general storm pattern that the majority of the storms follow, which is southwest to northeast.We try to stay south and east of the storm. Some chasers, if they’re north of the storm will try to get to the south side of it. That means driving through the worst of the storm, which is generally not a good idea. If you’re in the best position, you won’t get rained on or hailed on.”The chasers make use of their equipment when they’re out in the storm. They use GPS and the internet to deter-mine their location relative to the storm, HAM and CB ra-dios to keep in contact with other chasers and smart phones to report on storm development. Klarkowski said, “The best indicator of what’s going on in a storm is what you see with your eyes. The eyes are important, the radar is important. Your gut instincts are very important and I don’t think it’s talked about enough. If you feel uncomfortable, you’re usually in a bad position and need to get out.” The Stormchaser Club is composed of about 30 mem-bers, with around 12 active chasers in the summer. They hold meetings every other Wednesday, but said that might change. Corbett said that the reason he joined the Stormchasers was because he is an outdoorsman.“Being outside and looking at this beautiful force of nature is amazing,” Corbett said. “ Looking at what we calculate in class in real life is much better than the bookwork of class.” Michael Runyon News editor St. Cloud State University’s doors will stay open during the potential state shutdown. The Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MNSCU), which includes SCSU, have stated that they will be able to operate if the state shuts down July 1. MNSCU public relations direc-tor Melinda Voss said that MNS-CU would be able to use tuition and reserves to stay in operations during any potential shutdown, saying, “We will have access to our money.” The state is facing a possible shutdown due to a arguments over the budget between Gov. Mark Dayton and top Republican lawmakers. If the two sides do not reach an agreement by the end of the fiscal year, June 30, the state government will shut down until an agreement is reached. Voss said that MNSCU could operate into the fall semester if the state shuts down according to their latest projections. Voss added, “We’re confident that the Governor and the Legislature will work out an agreement.” Dayton and Republican law-makers have been gridlocked over the budget. Dayton said in a news conference that the Republicans must drop their plan to have the state spend less than $34 billion. Republican lawmakers have said that they’ve tried to meet Dayton on important issues, but will not have the state spend more than $34 billion. Voss said, “We have reserves and we’ll have tuition. There might be cash on hand. The resources are there for us to be able to operate. We have enough money to go for a while.” MNSCU has rescinded the 6,000 layoff notices sent earlier this summer. SCSU Provost, Devinder Mal-hodra, said that he was glad that SCSU could continue to operate, saying, “This is obviously impor-tant for our students because what this means is that our students dur-ing the summer and fall can pursue their education in an uninterrupted manner.” SCSU isn’t the only MNSCU college to stay open. All colleges and universities under MNSCU will be allowed to operate. MNS-CU is composed of 32 colleges and universities across the state. Voss said, “We’re very grateful that we were able to get this worked PHoTo CoURTeSY oF SCSU SToRMCHASeRS Group members study cloud formations while chasing a storm in Nebraska. Molly Wilms MaNagiNg editor The city of St. Cloud is often referred to as a “college town.” Students account for a portion of the city’s population, crime, attendance at festivi-ties and, of course, revenue. The fact is, students in general are a mi-gratory group. Many leave town for summer jobs or to return home for vacation.Local businesses are one of the groups affected by the coming and going of students, particularly from downtown.“Unfortunately, it’s not as much of an impact as it could or should be, and that’s for a lot of reasons,” said Pegg A.K. Gustafson, executive director of the St. Cloud Down-town Council. According to Gustafson, students account-ed for $90 million of revenue in St. Cloud last year. “From an economic impact, it’s huge, and we are not capitalizing on that like we could,” Gustafson said. St. Cloud is unique in that students ap-parently don’t spend as much time downtown as students in other college towns, Gustafson said. “That’s one of the reasons we did Fifth Avenue like that, trying to connect downtown more purposefully,” Gustafson said. “Then we hit the recession, and of course things changed.” While it may seem that bars are the businesses most frequented by students, their absence in the summer doesn’t have a devastating effect on all bars.“I notice a lot more people that live in the area, compared to students that are from out of the area,” said Matt Novak, a manager at D.B. Searles.Novak also said the weather affects busi-ness, since many people elect to stay home and grill instead of going out for dinner.D.B. Searles is not a business that targets students as clientele, which may be why Summer and its effect on St. Cloud businesses Meeting Grounds makes music Kyra Loch staff writer every month this summer, The Meeting Grounds will have their Friday night music events, Mak-ing Music for Making Changes. These events will start to be bi-weekly once the fall semester begins. The Meeting Grounds is a cof-fee shop located downtown. Making Music for Making Changes is a continuing series of musical events held on Fridays at the Meeting Grounds in down-town St. Cloud. The Meeting Grounds partners with local non-profit organization the Green Band to make further use of these Friday music events by also holding community benefit drives. “Making Music for Making Changes is an awareness project for local organizations,” Justin Michael, the executive Director of the Green Band, said. “We en-courage people to get active with other organizations.” Making Music for Making Changes started in February, and has grown with every event.“The way it sounds, people are enjoying themselves,” Shane Rath-bun, the owner of the Meeting Grounds, said. “At least they look to be enjoying themselves.” “It’s all been positive feed-back,” Michael said. “our smallest show had about 45-50 people, our largest had about 130 people.”each event will help bring awareness and support to different local community organizations.one successful music event from this past semester was a dia-per drive for the benefit of Anna Marie’s Alliance in St. Cloud. The event helped raise 1500 diapers for the shelter. “We want to continue doing things like that, and helping the community,” Rathbun said.Future events will be focusing again on Anna Marie’s Alliance, as well as local Boys and Girls Clubs and the St. Cloud Food Shelf. The events provide an opportunity as an alternative choice of weekend downtown entertainment for students along with giving back to local organizations. “one of the main reasons I started doing these events was for the kids who weren’t old enough to go to the bars yet, so they are able to do things too,” Rathbun said. “The big thing is it’s something positive.” •See Music/Page 2 •See Shutdown/Page 2 •See Businesses/Page 2
  • 2010-2011 Better Newspaper Contest  Page 68 First Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Samantha South White Horse gives up music, cites licensing fees An interesting and easy-to-read look into a lesser-known subject. Kudos to the writer for bringing this to the attention of the public in a simple-to-understand way. Second Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Molly Willms Community responds to assault –Interesting look into an incident that many may have been dismissed as a typical, overzealous college bar brawl. Honorable Mention: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Michael Runyon Coborn’s Plaza remains under half occupancy This story shows the paper’s “watchdog” eye on the school adminis- tration. Student house is expensive! Interesting look at what’s hap- pening in a half-filled residence hall. First Place: The Concordian, Moorhead, Patrick Ross The recount norm This writer manages to take a boring subject (to most) and make it not only interesting and informative, but also fun. Second Place: The Concordian, Concordia College, Moorhead, Patrick Ross Election 2010–Again, Ross manages to make a sometimes stuffy sub- ject a really interesting column. This writer has real potential! Honorable Mention: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Chris Bremseth Nuclear power is vital in energy production Timely column. Bremseth prompts students to think about the local implications of an international disaster. First Place: MSU Reporter, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Nate Brennan Snow storms cause wrangled roadsters Photo accurately captures the frustration and challenges commuter students face in the wake of large snow storms! Second Place: University Chronicle, St. Cloud State University, Jun-Kai Teoh Cirko Cabaret pushes human limits Beautiful photos. Photographer made good use of the lighting. Investigative Reporting–5 entries Feature Photo–6 entries Kristian Helgeson theater review “Hockey Mom, Hockey Dad,” presented by Pioneer Place On Fifth, is about exactly that. The story revolves around two char-acters; Teddy and Donna, who’s sons are both on the same Peewee hockey team, which isn’t exactly on a winning streak. The original debut of the performance, which was last year, did not feature Ross Young as Teddy, but when the performance went on tour this year Ross stepped up and learned the role. This play was per-formed expertly and was thoroughly enjoyable. The director Ross Young, who also played the male role Teddy said, “I had 8 weeks to rehearse this role.” In that short amount of time Ross was able to get the script down and perform it nearly flawlessly. The nearly sold out audi-ence responded positively.Noticeable flaws this play had were the few vocal issues, but a stutter here or there didn’t take away from the quality of the script or the dedication of the two talented actors. The audience responded to the comedic tone of the show at every turn. The dialogue between the two parents was filled with clever hockey puns. For example, Teddy in the heat of the hockey game yelled, “This is where your dad is, this is the coaches corner!!” If you are familiar with youth hockey, as many Minnesotans are, you most likely know a parent like Teddy. He is the hockey version of the “backseat driver.” “Hockey Mom, Hockey Dad” has a comedic side, but also has a deep mes- sage. Throughout the progression of the story the audience learns of a dark secret hidden by Donna. By the end of the play the audience has gone through every emotion possible. It poses the question, “what is the real me capable of ?” Perhaps the most enjoy-able scene of this perfor-mance was when Teddy’s son Troy scored his first goal ever. Teddy reacted with the excited statement, “Holy hot steaming s***, my boy scored a goal!” He then, caught up in the excitement of the moment, kissed Donna. Heidi Fellner and Ross Young are two very talented actors who truly understand their roles. When either actor had an emotional role to play, it felt like they were living the characters’ lives.Both of these actors can be found acting in the Twin Cities and on occasion tak-ing their talents north to St. Cloud. Heidi is known for her stand up in the Twin Cities, but she can also be found in some plays. A new play she is taking part in is called “Panic” at Park Square in St. Paul. Ross can be found doing various plays in the Twin Cities and the St. Cloud area. This performance, even with its minor flaws, was an exciting, fun, and entertain-ing for everyone watching. Both the dialogue and the acting was exceptional in its execution. These times are tough for actors, so if you truly want to be entertained and help maintain the arts in your community, please go out and enjoy a theater performance. Jun-Kai Teoh game column The video gaming industry is somewhat similar to the movie industry. One of the biggest similar-ities for example is this – with the dawn of new technology, quality products have faltered significantly. In the movie industry, people are obsessed with 3D and the like. In the gaming industry, it’s 3D, along with the next-generation realistic graphics and all that jazz.A few weeks back, TyRu-ben Ellingson of “Avatar” and “Battle: Los Angeles” fame was on-campus giving talks and visiting classes. In an interview with the Chronicle, he said that the quality of products would rise again when technicians start taking a back seat and the creative minds take to the stage again. Even though he was talk-ing about the movie industry, it applies fairly well to the gam-ing industry as well. For the longest time, the video gaming industry has been obsessed with the techni-cal aspects of a game. “Crysis” was so engrossed in looking pretty that it forgot about making it fun. “Final Fantasy XIII” was one of the pioneers of cel-shaded graphics, but horrible gameplay wise. “Final Fantasy XIII” was a disappointment on all fronts save for glitter. “Star Wars: The Force Unleashed” had the fancy physics engine and a strong franchise, but let’s be honest – it sucked. On the other hand we have fantastic games like “Minecraft,” “Portal,” and “Amnesia: The Dark Descent.” Graphically, they’re nothing exceptional, but they’re great fun to play nonetheless. It’s been a long time coming, but games are slowly catching up with all the tech-nological improvements now.Similar to Nintendo’s philosophy with the DS and the Wii, it’s more important to be fun than it is to be beautiful.“Crysis 2” may have sacri-ficed a little in terms of graph-ics, and it may be a bit more linear, but it’s tons more fun.Instead of game develop-ers worrying too much about 3D, we have Nvidia and AMD (the hardware makers) taking on that task. The first game to use Un-real Engine came out in 2006, but the first few years were plagued with lackluster games. It wasn’t until the recent years where more quality games were churned out. The “CryEngine” series – famous for being extremely advanced and used in “Far Cry” and “Crysis,” – on the other hand have few adopters and even fewer good games running it. Fancy technology doesn’t make a good game, and developers have to realize that gamers may spend only a few minutes marveling at the beauty of a game -- but they will be spending hours actually playing it. Make it easy on the eyes because that’s all we gam-ers really need; but make the game fun, make it simple if it has to be, because that might just make it good. An addictive game doesn’t have to be complex. “Hoard” is a fairly simple game with a few key concepts, and it’s high-ly addictive. “Left 4 Dead” was a runaway hit, and its formula was simply run and gun. But if anything the trend of games seems to be on the rise. True, developers seem to be rehashing old games, mak-ing reboots of old titles and cashing in on established titles, but for every “Crysis” out there we have five indie games pushing the boundaries. Marquee Page 10 - University Chronicle Monday, April 18, 2011 REVIEWS.movie.game.album.book.theater. Jazz plays for spring Molly Willms marquee editor Dueling instruments and jazz classics were on the bill for Wednesday’s Jazz Concert. The spring edition of the twice-yearly concert featured performances by the smaller Jazz Combo group followed by the Jazz Ensemble. The groups performed a total of 10 pieces, or “charts,” ranging from well-known jazz favorites to modern, urban interpreta-tions of the genre. The combo started out the concert with “Three In One” by Wayne Wal-lace. They also performed “Autumn Leaves,” with Kim Gast, conductor of both jazz groups and a professor of jazz studies and saxophone, on piano. Gast called the chart “a very old, old jazz standard.” The second piece and the final piece were by Marcus Miller and were less traditional jazz, according to Gast. “This is kind of urban music,” Gast said. “Is it jazz? Maybe, maybe not. It’s like cilantro, you either like it or you don’t. We hope you do.” The pieces featured solos by Melissa Hender-son, David Kent, Matt Prigge, Ian Benoit and Martin Schulga. After a brief intermission, some of the combo left the stage. Those who remained were joined by the members of the ensemble. The Jazz Ensemble performed pieces by Cole Porter, Benny Carter, and Dizzy Gillespie, among others. They featured solos by Matt Prigge, Taylor Eliason, and DJ Torguson on saxophone; Armando Saldarini and Cory Marri-er-Leppanen on trumpet; David Kent and John Gladen on trombone, Kris Christenson on bass and Martin Schulga on piano.Between the two groups, Schulga played a solo on many songs. “Martin gets better every year,” Gast said after announcing another Schul-ga solo. “Think how good he’ll sound in five years.”The fifth piece, “Tenor Madness” by Sonny Rollins, featured a “battle” on the tenor saxophones by Prigge and Eliason. The ensemble finished with “A Night in Tunisia” by Gillespie. The lively performance featured a battle-style duet at the start by Saldarini and Marrier-Leppanen on trumpet. The groups performed for a nearly-full recital hall, the audience responded with thunderous applause and cheers after each solo and individual piece. B