Smart cities in India

Government & Nonprofit

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  • � A SPECIAL RESEARCH STUDY BY INDIA TRANSPORT PORTAL 2nd edition SMART CITIES AND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT
  • � Copyright India Transport Portal TABLE OF CONTENTS Modi’s ambitious plan – 100 smart cities P3-P5 Interview Schneider Electric – Mr Anil Kadam P6-P7 Smart city concept finds favour world over P8-P9 Interview World Bank India Mr Barjor Mehta and Mr Ke Fang P10-P11 Intelligent transport Systems : Feasible in India ? P12-P14 Interview General Electric Transportation Mr Vageesh Patil P15-P16 Smart Cities India 2015 P17-P18 Interview Exhibitions India Group - Mr Prem Behl P19-P20 References P21
  • � Copyright India Transport Portal Modi’s ambitious plan - 100 smart cities In his budget speech, Union Finance Minister Arjun Jaitley said that “unless new cities are developed to accommodate the burgeoning number of people, the existing cities would soon become unliveable.” Modi wants to build over a �00 smart cities to deal with the rapidly increasing urbanisation, traffic congestion and decreasing quality of people’s lives and the environment. Fiscal constraints demand diligence and that global ‘smart solutions’ be tailored to suit this emerging economy where even basic amenities are hard to come by for millions. Traditional growth drivers are giving way to technologically advanced and creative ones. The defining feature of a smart city is optimisation and strengthening core systems and making them smarter. According to Caragliu et al. (�009), “a city can be defined as ‘smart’ when investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICT) communication infrastructure fuel sustainable economic development and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory action and engagement.” This concept, introduced by IBM in their ‘Smart Planet’ initiative post the economic recession of �008 has become a buzz word in India since the new government has taken control. There is no standard definition as such but key criteria typically include smart economy, smart mobility, smart energy production and conservation, smart living, smart governance, smart healthcare and smart environment. The IBM Institute for Business Value has identified three key components to create smarter cities: instrumentation, interconnection and intelligence. Instrumentation includes sensors, utility meters and other devices to help gather top-quality data. Interconnection involves connecting people, data and systems like never before. Intelligence will help make predictions for better decision making via new computational models and algorithms. Many cities have picked certain aspects of a city to optimize to help run it more efficiently. For example, GE has implemented smart grids for Atlanta. Smart city projects can be either greenfield or brownfield projects. IBM identified seven systems and prerequisites to manage and apply smart solutions to achieve favourable outcomes. The ‘�I’ strategy is the basis of the IBM Smarter Planet vision. The company has partnered with numerous city authorities, offering Smart City solutions to better manage limited resources. IBM’s expected revenue growth for �0�5 is $�0 billion, with the Smarter Planet initiative expected to contribute $7 billion in revenues. A team at Frost & Sullivan has identified parallels—smart city concepts—after studying various smart city projects world over. They defined smart cities as “those that have at least five out of the eight “smart” parameters” shown in the figure, whereas those that implemented at least two of the key aspects were termed eco-friendly cities.
  • � Copyright India Transport Portal Modi’s ambitious plan 100 smart cities Narendra Modi, perhaps one of the most ambitious prime ministers India has ever had, is all set to bring nothing less than a hundred ‘smart cities’ to the country. A ‘grand promise’ he made during his pre-election campaign, the concept of the smart city has been received with mixed reactions. In his speech in June, he said, «Cities in the past were built on riverbanks. They are now built along highways. But in the future, they will be built based on availability of optical fibre networks and next-generation infrastructure.» These technologically advanced cities will obviously be capital- intensive projects. Modi expects to attract investors from abroad and other private players for the INR7060-crore (USD�.� billion) project. The focus will be on smart transport and better amenities. Urban Development Minister, Venkaiah Naidu, said «Emphasis on building smart cities, urban renewal, provision of basic amenities and promoting affordable housing in urban areas is the need of the hour as it is required to meet the aspirations of the countrymen for a better urban living.» Naidu stated that, “The PM wants to take big city living to a new level where ��/7 utility services become an essential in public service delivery. So would be technology-based governance and monitoring of services provided to citizens. Not to miss, a high quality social infrastructure including Wi-Fi zones and recreational spaces form core of the new plans for these cities on the anvil.” He added, “A smart city cannot have only a few hours of water supply a day, or electricity that goes off for several hours, or streets littered with garbage. The general appearance of the city has to be pleasing and clean. In Delhi, it is being proposed that the DDA will develop a new smart city through the land pooling scheme and in that, parts of the NDMC area may also be considered for demonstrating all the components of smart cities.” The selection parameters will vary and will not be one-size-fits-all. The urban growth rate, unique features and the state’s population will be among the deciding factors. Perhaps intelligent transport systems (ITS) solve India’s massive traffic problems and regulate the emission of noxious pollutants. According to the IIM-Transport Corporation of India study conducted in �0��, about INR60,000 crore ($9 billion) are lost annually due to traffic congestion. Zero-Sum ITS, an Ahmedabad- based company, is trying to ascertain if technology could help solve issues that spring from heavy traffic using camera-based traffic sensors and cloud-based control centres. The firm’s Managing Director, Chikara Kikuji, said, “The key goal of the ITS solution being implemented by Zero-Sum is to ensure better traffic management by providing more information to road users and enabling them to plan their trips optimally thereby reducing travel time, saving fuel and decongesting busy roads.” A successful cost-effective, customised ITS can help avoid accidents, handle emergency situations, and manage traffic and traveller information in India. All set to change India’s landscape, the �00 proposed smart cities that will run on technology have IT majors like IBM and Cisco queueing up with smart-city ‘blueprints.’ The CEO of IBM, Virginia Rometty, met with Modi during his recent New York visit to express the company’s interest in «software for Smart Cities and Digital India initiatives.» India already has a few independent smart city projects such as Hindustan Construction Company’s (HCC) Lavasa Smart City in Pune, SAP’s project in Bhopal and Cisco’s project in Electronic City in Bangalore. Obama’s government will help India build smart cities envisioned in Vishakhapatnam, Allahabad and Ajmer. Modi has asked Singapore and France to offer expertise in urban planning for issues such as IT management, energy grids and waste management. Japanese PM, Shinzo Abe, has extended help to turn the city of Varanasi into a smart city while preserving its cultural heritage. In his previous stint as the chief minister of the state of Gujarat, Modi got the ball rolling for the development of India’s first smart city in its industrial corridors - the greenfield 886-acre Gujarat International Finance Tec-city (GIFT) project will be a financial centre. The brownfield 90�-sq.km Dholera SIR will be an extensive industrial area. The focus on urbanization and the competition with China could well give India back its Mojo. In his ‘Election Manifesto’ Modi called Urban Areas ‘High Growth Centres.’ According to the BJP urban policy, “our cities should no longer remain a reflection of poverty and bottlenecks. Rather they should become symbols of efficiency, speed and scale.” Modi wants to create the smart cities in the proposed industrial corridors, which connect major metros, planned for the nation. The government is keen to attract foreign capital to these commercial and industrial nodes. Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) is lending $�.5 billion to the Delhi- Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project and will also help plan three smart cities in the Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor— Krishnapatnam (Andhra Pradesh), Ponneri (Tamil Nadu) and Tumkur (Karnataka) in the Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor. Great Britain will offer to help India to develop the Bangalore-Mumbai Economic Corridor.
  • 5 Modi’s ambitious plan 100 smart cities Copyright India Transport Portal Research indicates that 70 percent of the population could well be living in cities by �050 and 50 percent by �0�9 in India. The increasing levels of migration from rural to urban areas have been the impetus for the development of smart cities. The PM’s idea of ‘hyper-urbanisation’ has not really instilled nationwide optimism as housing and amenities for all, as promised by the development of smart city projects, could turn out to be an expensive pledge in a country where nearly �70 million people live below the poverty line. Others argue that with the world experiencing the ‘age of digitization,’ the concept of the smart city - eco-friendly, sustainable urban settlements - could well be the answer to assure people that their basic needs will be met. In India, the construction of smart cities will have plenty of challenges to overcome. How far will all the stakeholders work towards implementing ‘smart technology’? Will the people contribute effectively to the sustainable use of resources? Time also has to be factored in as these projects will most likely take �0–�0 years to become a reality.
  • 6 Copyright India Transport Portal 100 smart cities are planned to be built in India…Have you already been involved in Smart cities around the world? If yes, how? Do you think India has the potential to achieve this huge objective? In less than �0 years, 70% of the world’s population will reside in our cities. This rapid migration will push both current and future urban centres to their seams and expand industrial and residential infrastructures beyond their breaking points. Cities face huge challenges: congestion, pollution, blackouts, crime, debt, and rising costs - while competing with each other for investment, jobs, and talents. The growth and its challenges raise important questions that must be considered by cities around the world. Schneider Electric has its hand in more than �00 smart city projects around the world, notably Beijing, Dallas, Grenoble and Rio de Janeiro. It offers a range of technologies toward this end, such as its new Building Analytics software and services, which pull information from building sensors, utility meters and control systems. It also is skilled in energy savings performance contracting, in which the company assumes the capital risk for building or infrastructure improvements in exchange for fees based on the money those investments save along the way. How would you define a smart city? How is it different from an “intelligent city” or a “digital city”? In my view a ‘Smart City’ is an urban area that is highly rated in terms of overall infrastructure, sustainable real estate, communication technology and market viability. It is a city where information technology is the fundamental framework and the basis for providing necessary services to residents. The essential difference between a smart city and a ‘digital’ or ’intelligent’ city is that a smart city is one that completely runs on technology—be it for power, water, sanitation and waste treatment, ��/7 water supply, traffic and transport. Smart mobility seems to cover many challenges India is facing in terms of transport (road construction, traffic, safety). What are your concrete solutions to set up smart mobility? The sharp spike in the number of vehicles on the roads of the metropolitans has become a matter of concern for the respective state governments. The infrastructure and traffic management systems present in these cities are not being able to cope with the traffic bottlenecks and more importantly, the rising level of road accidents. INTERVIEW - SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC being able to cope with the traffic bottlenecks and more importantly, the rising level of road accidents. Smart Mobility has become the need of the hour and the state governments as well as the centre are looking to implement these solutions across all metros in order to improve the urban traffic situation of the country. Schneider Electric has provided such solution in one of the busiest suburbs of India in South Mumbai. The municipal corporation of Greater Mumbai was facing a number of problems due to chronic traffic snarls. They decided to approach Schneider Electric India in order to facilitate traffic management flow in the city. Schneider Electric came up with an Adaptive Traffic Control System (ATCS) which modifies traffic signal cycles in real time by means of surveillance sensors or devices installed on site to respond to changing traffic conditions. ATCS was designed in such a manner that a master controller could regulate traffic control coming in from all directions. The installation of this system resulted in a �0% increase in average traffic speed and a �7% reduction in travel times in the region. Are you involved in digital and intelligent transport systems? Schneider Electric offers �0 years of demonstrated expertise in developing, deploying, and supporting complex transportation management solutions in Europe, North and South America, Asia- Pacific, and the Middle East – with intelligent transportation systems (ITS) successfully managing some of the world’s most complex and congested markets. Schneider Electric Traffic solutions are helping to optimize daily traffic conditions, increase customer satisfaction, enhance road safety, and protect the environment at installations serving: • Sao Paulo Urban Transportation Center (Brazil) • Panama City UTC • Madrid Mobility Management Center (Spain) • Rosario UTC Project (Argentina) • Lebanon UTC Project • Beijing Supercenter (Mobility Management Project)
  • 7 Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC Mr Anil Kadam Senior Manager – Solution Architect (Utilities) Anil Kadam is Senior Manager - Solution Architect for Energy and Utilities (Smart Grids) at Schneider Electric. He has over 12 years of experience in the field of Energy Automation, Energy Management and Smart Grid. Mr Kadam specializes in the field of Smart Grid and Smart Cities, which form the central need of the present-day urban challenges. He has presented multiple papers and delivered several lectures in the field of Smart Grid. He has also worked with several Energy Automation & Infrastructure companies in the past. Some of these include - Marketing/Sales Manager - Substation Automation Solutions, with ABB India; Marketing Manager - Substation Automation Solutions, with Areva-T&D UK; Manager - Technical Marketing/Projects - N/W Automation & Protection Systems, Easun Reyrolle Ltd India etc. What are the top priorities in India in terms of transport and your potential solutions? What smart cities could bring to these issues? India is a huge market for us in terms of investment and business. The ATCS developed by us has been working in south Mumbai in the Colaba area over a stretch of about �� km after the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai awarded the project in �007. Apart from improved traffic flow, the south Mumbai area has also reported reduced air pollution due to the ATCS. Our top priority is to implement such solutions across the metropolitan cities in India in order to solve the traffic problem and safety issues which have existed in India for a very long time now. Our aim behind the creation of Smart Cities is to turn conventional Indian cities in to livable, efficient & sustainable cities thereby delivering benefits to all of the stakeholders.
  • 8 Smart city concept finds favour world over A smart city, as described in The Hindu, “is an urban region that is highly advanced in terms of overall infrastructure, sustainable real estate, communications and market viability; it is a city where information technology is the principal infrastructure and the basis for providing essential services to residents.” Inspired by emerging smart cities across the globe - in China, Amsterdam and the Emirates, Modi’s NDA government has proposed a hundred such cities across the country. India’s new BJP government is keen on helping India catch up with technologically advanced countries as soon as possible. Urbanization in India is expected to be over 75 percent before we hit �0�0. Economy is growing and Prime Minister Modi has ambitious, progressive plans for his country including building �00 smart cities - cities that are liveable, efficient and sustainable. According to Schneider Electric, vision, integration, solutions, innovation and collaboration will make a city ‘smart.’ How far this urban utopia will be successful in a country that is victim to serious issues such as poverty and lack of basic amenities is a subject of heated discussion in India. But Modi has brought with him a kind of urban awakening modelled on the top notch quality of global cities such as those seen in China, the Gulf and Europe. The face of urban China is changing with many technologically advanced smart cities planned for the country. The Chinese government considers it a ‘key national policy.’ The Chinese National Bureau of Statistics in �0�� said that the country’s rate of urbanisation had already exceeded 50 percent and perhaps for the first time, there were more people in China’s cities than its villages. Building smart cities will help cities with millions of inhabitants grow in a sustainable manner and deal with traffic congestion, pollution and housing problems efficiently. Not to be left behind, the Middle East is also implementing its share of smart city projects. Economic progress, energy efficiency and generating employment are key focus areas for the Emirates. In Saudi Arabia, there are six smart cities coming up; in Qatar, there are three—Lusail’s Smart and Sustainable City, Energy City Qatar, and Pearl-Qatar Island; and, in the United Arab Emirates, two have been proposed—Smart city Dubai and Masdar City in Abu Dhabi. Costing under $�0 billion, the Masdar project—a ‘sustainable’ city aiming to be ‘the first zero-carbon, zero-waste city’—is expected to be complete by �0�5. In Europe, Amsterdam has its urban model of the future ready. The Amsterdam Smart city is a sustainable platform where ‘innovators’ are ready with smart solutions to tackle urban issues and improve ‘liveability’ of the city; they are involved in nearly 70 projects. Copenhagen, Stockholm and Vienna, among the greenest cities in the world, are also rapidly adopting the smart lifestyle. Copyright India Transport Portal
  • 9 SMART CITy CONCEpT FINDS FAVOuR WORLD OVER How will a densely populated emerging economy like India achieve its dream of building over a hundred smart cities? “The real estate of the future cannot be built with the building blocks of the past. Progressive formats such as smart cities are the result of vast knowledge and know-how. In a developing country like India, where the more advanced concepts of urbanisation are still work in progress, the inputs required for the success of futuristic concepts are, at best, spread thinly on the ground,” says Anuj Puri of real estate company Jones Lang LaSalle-India. He added: “The Ministry of Urban Development must move forward on a highly consultative basis and allow these inputs to flow freely. Moreover, the blueprints that have worked on foreign shores must be feasibly interpreted in the Indian context — nothing in this respect can simply be imported and made to work here.” Modi, who was rather ‘dazzled’ after his �0�� China visit, initiated India’s first smart city —GIFT — in his home state of Gujarat. But India’s metropolises are basically plagued by myriad civic woes, and most analysts believe that making these existing cities habitable should be given more importance than investing millions in ‘flashy’ projects. Copyright India Transport Portal
  • �0 Narendra Modi’s project of building 100 smart cities in India is very ambitious. How do you think India can achieve it? What does it mean for India’s urbanization from your expert’s point of view? Based on media reports and public speeches of the Hon. Minister of Urban Development, it appears that the GoI is planning to facilitate �00 existing cities to develop governance, administrative systems and processes and ensure effective delivery of services such as water, solid waste, street lighting and urban mobility, among others, in a smart way. With strong policy support, assistance and catalytic financing from the central government, coupled with strong buy in from and ownership by state governments, a program to develop �00 smart cities, which can become role models for other cities, is very feasible. Smart cities seem to embrace many realities: infrastructure, transport, growth…How can such global projects be developed and realized? Under India’s constitution, urban development is a state subject and the central government has a role in formulation of national urban policies, providing guidance and coordinating capacity building. Role of state governments is critical and essential. Each state government would have to determine the nature of support that can be provided to cities within their state. Therefore, to be successful, a national program such as �00 smart cities requires active consultations with and strong support from state governments. Given that India’s different states are developing at varying speeds and are forging their own paths, a national program will be required to be flexible and adaptable. Some cities around the world are already considered as smart cities… Which cities in the world could be considered as smart cities? What India could learn from their experiences? (good and bad practices) There is no global commonly accepted and applicable definition of a smart city. What may be considered as smart in one country may not be acceptable in other countries. Each country, therefore, has to arrive at a national consensus and work towards reaching that goal. Moreover, what constitutes smartness today may be very different a decade from now. Therefore, India will have to set itself a definition for its cities but with a clear understanding that the definition will need modification over the implementation period. INTERVIEW - WORLD BANK INDIA Is the World Bank going to be involved in this huge project in India? If yes, in what way? In a meeting between the Hon. Prime Minister of India and the visiting President of the World Bank, it was agreed that the Bank would continue supporting the Government of India’s efforts in developing its urban agenda. We will be involved both in terms of knowledge sharing from across the world as well as in possible future investments. On October �, �0��, the Bank organized an International Knowledge Exchange on Smart Cities in New Delhi where international experts and practitioners with field experience of developing smart cities exchanged information and experiences with their Indian counterparts from the Government of India as well as state governments. About transportation…It seems to be a huge part and stake of smart cities, especially in India where the road construction pace is still considered as too weak, where roads are not safe, rail needs massive investment. How can smart cities accelerate and improve their transport system? You are right. Indian cities need a lot of transport infrastructure, and they need to be constructed very quickly in order to catch up with the rapid growing urban transport needs. We understand one of the purposes of this “�00 Smart Cities” program is to accelerate and improve transport systems in Indian cities. International experiences have shown this goal can be achieved through improvements in all aspects of urban transport development, from planning, financing, institutions, regulations, to operations. We believe innovations, in terms of the ways to maximize the benefits from all existing natural, financing, human, and technological resources and minimizing negative impacts on society and the natural environment, would play a very critical role, if this �00 Smart Cities were to achieve the desired results. Copyright India Transport Portal
  • �� Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - WORLD BANK INDIA How would you define smart mobility? Is it just about public transport? In our view, the goal of smart mobility is to provide universal safe, secure mobility and access to jobs/services, for all the people who come to live in urban areas, regardless of income, gender, age, physical conditions. From this perspective, public transport is an important element of smart mobility, but it is not the only element. We consider smart mobility in India would include at least the following (i) Smart mobility planning, utilizing new planning tools and technologies such as GIS, satellite pictures, crowdsourcing through mobile phones, integration with land use planning, etc. (ii) Smart provision of infrastructure and services for clean and efficient transport modes such as public transport/non-motorized transport/green freight transport; (iii) Smart traffic and transport safety management; (iv) Smart travel demand management, utilizing various regulatory, economic, and cooperative tools/incentives to better manage the growth of the ownership and the use of private vehicles; and (v) smart urban/ spatial growth management to encourage the use of clean and efficient transport modes, and to avoid or reduce the unnecessary or undesirable needs for motorized private transport modes. Question nos. 1, 2,3 and 4 were answered by Barjor Mehta, Lead Urban Specialist, World Bank and 5-6 to Ke Fang, Lead Transport Specialist, World Bank.
  • �� Copyright India Transport Portal Intelligent transport systems: Feasible in India? The EU Directorate General for Mobility and Transport defines intelligent transport systems (ITS) as “several combinations of communication, computer and control technology developed and applied in the domain of transport to improve system performance, transport safety, efficiency, productivity, and level of service, environmental impacts, energy consumption, and mobility.” Will PM Modi’s ambitious plans for smart cities and intelligent mobility be feasible? As of now, various ITS initiatives have been successfully implemented or are in the pilot stages in various metro cities across India. It’s but natural that transport discussions will veer towards smart mobility with the current buzz word being ‘smart cities’. Increasing levels of urbanization necessitate the need for intelligent transport systems that enhance the social, economic and cultural life of a city. Smart mobility integrates clean energy technology into a traffic system that is multimodal. To ensure that mobility issues related to safety and pollution are a thing of the past, agencies world over have invested time and money to come up with innovative, efficient transport solutions. Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) will integrate electronics, computer technology and management strategies to bring about seamless and efficient connectivity that has minimal negative impact on the economic, demographic, social and environmental dimensions of a country. Though the world is in the initial stages of this phenomenal process of transformation for the movement of both people and freight, researchers and other relevant stakeholders are giving it their all to turn this vision into reality. ITS Canada’s Strategic Business Plan defines ITS as “the application of advanced and emerging technologies (computers, sensors, control, communications, and electronic devices) in transportation to save lives, time, money, energy and the environment.” They are often found as stand-alone applications because they are less expensive; but they need to be thought of in terms of system integration in the long run. Examples of ITS technologies include communication technologies in ITS like microwaves, short-range radio waves, DSRC, mobile communications and the Internet; global navigation technology for automatically locating vehicles and tracking, geographical information systems, data acquisition and exchange, camera systems and artificial vision, in-vehicle systems and digital mapping. According to the World Bank, ITS can be divided into nine areas: traveller information, traffic management, demand management, road management, advanced driving assistance, electronic financial transactions, commercial vehicle management, public transport management and incident and hazard response.
  • �� INTELLIGENT TRANSpORT SySTEM FEASIBLE IN INDIA? Copyright India Transport Portal Be it a developed or developing country, the reasons for deploying ITS are similar as they offer far more benefits than conventional transportation systems. People need reliable, affordable and convenient transportation and efficient movement of freight to go about their lives and better mobility will undoubtedly enhance the quality of their lives, especially for people with special needs. The benefits of IT systems are plenty - they offer safety, security and environmental protection. ITS can reduce road crashes, alert emergency services, ease traffic flows, and open up alternate routes; they can bring down costs incurred due to delays in work flow and productivity thanks to traffic congestion; and, they can lead to a �0-percent decline in GHG emissions and minimize fuel loss due to stop-start driving. Users can enjoy increased efficiency with systems like electronic toll collection, smart cards and in-vehicle navigation. Traffic management and information and warning systems in vehicles are also stand-alone applications that are part of ITS. The concept of e-mobility will ideally address fuel efficiency and emission standards. Perhaps the future will belong to electro mobility, which refers to “using electric powertrain technologies, in- vehicle information, and communication technologies and connected infrastructures to enable the electric propulsion of vehicles and fleets.” Most major auto makers have plug-in hybrids, electric vehicles and those that use the hydrogen fuel cell. Any process that will save time, lives and money will warrant an effective application in the lives of people everywhere. The authorities will have to implement both road and vehicle-based systems in a coordinated manner to provide society-wide benefits. technology that is the key component of ITS can help lay the groundwork for these transport systems. Increasing the efficiency for both users and operators is naturally a win–win situation. Information technology that is the key component of ITS can help lay the groundwork for these transport systems. Increasing the efficiency for both users and operators is naturally a win–win situation. The World Bank supports this new dependence on knowledge rather capital. Research and development, transfer of technology, education, and exchange of information are supported by the development of IT. The requirement for ITS can foster new local businesses that manufacture the equipment as well open avenues for renovation and maintenance in the future. The deployment of intelligent transport systems can enhance regional integration and the dissemination of information technology. There are a few prerequisites - institutional and technological - for the deployment of ITS. In developing countries like India, the lack of basic infrastructure is aggravated by the limited availability of technical and financial resources. At the same time, retrofitting that could prove expensive in developed countries (with adequate infrastructure) can be avoided as electronic and physical infrastructure will likely be installed simultaneously. Also, updating existing systems is often more expensive than starting from scratch. They can exploit information available from the first-mover countries. These reasons often help developing countries ‘leapfrog’ to intelligent transport systems far quicker. All the advantages afforded by ITS are not always transportation related but economic and social. With vehicle ownership burgeoning in India, the impact on the lives of its citizens is not trivial. The gravity of the impact of climate change and rising numbers of people moving to urban areas have India’s new government proposing the building of smart cities for the future, modelled on smart cities in more developed parts of the world.
  • �� Copyright India Transport Portal INTELLIGENT TRANSpORT SySTEM FEASIBLE IN INDIA? This emerging economy has to come up with financially prudent solutions in the form of public policy that addresses India’s expanding population and other constraints. In India, ITS can be successfully used for intersection control, incident detection, vehicle classification, monitoring, revenue collection and collating historical traffic data. From the commuter’s perspective, ITS can help in estimating travel times, selecting optimal routes, providing congestion maps and information about public transport, individual vehicle management and accident handling. For example, Volvo’s �60 degree anti-collision scanner will scan the surroundings of a truck to help prevent accidents that occur due to limited vision, and this technology is in the test phase. Companies like IBM, Cisco Systems and Schneider Electric offer smart mobility solutions by improving the efficiency of operations and providing ‘smart information.’ IBM introduced the smart city concept. Schneider Electric helps better air quality and reduces traffic congestion related issues ‘through centralised, real-time adaptive traffic management.’ The company also offers highly accurate tolling systems, tools to ‘manage and secure’ bridge and tunnel sites, smart traveller information and solutions for integrated city mobility management. Cisco believes that pretty much everything in the world will be connected by the Internet soon - the Internet of Everything (IoE) will ‘bring together people, process, data and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable.’ The American company works with innovators worldwide to set up smart cities - Bangalore, the silicon valley of India, will get the Cisco Smart City. Some of the ITS initiatives that have helped regulate traffic and reduce accidents in India include the Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) project planned for all the national highways with the concept being tested on NH-5 on the Chandigarh- Parwanoo bit. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based ETC is already being tested on the 95-km Ahmedabad- Mumbai stretch. Bus Rapid Transport Corridors have been implemented in Pune, Ahmedabad, Delhi and Indore. Advanced Parking Management Systems in Delhi can be found in Palika Bazaar, which uses Electronic Parking Guidance and VMS Smart Cards to accommodate �500 vehicles, and in Sarojini Nagar Market, which has automated multi-level parking. Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) deployed city-wide ITS in Mysore to better its bus system in �0��. The ITS Master plan in Hyderabad (CCTVs, ATCC, weather stations, and flood and pollution sensors) will be implemented in three phases at a cost of around EUR��0 million. The B-TRAC project by the Bangalore Traffic Police uses speed interceptors, cameras, centrally controlled traffic signalling, citations and mobile enforcement. The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) plans to bring �67 busy signals under the Area Traffic Control (ATC) that will help commuters save time by not having to wait at these signals at a cost of around INR5.66 crore (~USD0.9� billion). Modi’s vision of a �00 smart cities across India is slowly gathering support. During Modi’s recent 5-day visit to Japan, Shinzo Abe, the Japanese PM, pledged $�� billion to improve India’s infrastructure and will include helping Modi realise his smart-city dream. Japan will enable India’s initiative to develop urban areas by offering ‘multi-modal transport solutions.’ PM Modi hopes that using computational technologies, wireless communication and sensing technology to meet the challenges of rapid urbanisation and motorisation will take India to a better tomorrow. With cost and space constraints, the ITS models followed in developed countries cannot be applied without modification to managing traffic in India. India is expected to surpass China soon as the fastest growing economy in the world. The transportation demands will be huge with the rapid migration to urban areas and the massive number of vehicles on the roads. India has a road network that is underdeveloped, budget that is severely restricted, lack of awareness among users, lack of interest among policy makers, poor demand for automation and limited resources for operation and maintenance of the technology. India’s current attempts at deploying intelligent transportation systems show a lot of promise. Western ITS standards are unlikely to work in India unless they are tailored to suit its physical, lifestyle and cultural diversity. The decision makers will have to come up with timelines that are realistic and schedules that take a step-by-step approach, understand the needs of all stakeholders and appreciate the constraints before blindly embracing the concept of digitization. In theory, the idea of smart cities and smart mobility is fantastic, but how far they will be feasible or successful in reality is anybody’s guess.
  • �5 Copyright India Transport Portal Could you introduce yourself briefly and tell us about your activities at GE Transportation in India? GE Transportation is a $5B business engaged in delivering diesel electric locomotives, mining systems, signaling solutions, marine & stationary engines, services technologies and solutions. We are �0,000 employees strong, including �,�00 engineers worldwide. In India, I lead the GE Transportation Engineering team of ~800 engineers who work on design, development and validation of diesel electric locomotives, signaling & rail solutions and mining systems. We are continuously investing in developing capability, capacity and competency to deliver state-of-the-art locomotive technologies, systems and solutions to the business. You have been part of the launch of latest technology products such as Evolution Series locomotives. What are their main features? How different are they from locomotives actually commercialized and used in India? The Evolution Series locomotives are Tier-� emission compliant, with most fuel efficiency, high reliability and optimized life cycle cost. They have been designed with state-of-the-art control technologies with on-board and off-board diagnostics, motor driven auxiliaries and optimized packaging to achieve right balance and efficient system performance. These locomotives are an order ahead in technology and performance compared to commercialized locomotives in India. How are your products sustainable for the transportation industry? Diesel electric locomotives are designed for �0 years of life with high reliability and very well defined maintenance schedules. Adhering to proper maintenance and managing the right usage, these locomotives are not only sustainable on rail roads but also deliver enough power to meet haulage requirements. The locomotives adapt to different climatic conditions as it is an important input in our design process to ensure performance doesn’t get impacted in harsh operating environments. Emissions meet EPA norms at all times, hence these locomotives are very environment friendly. All aspects of design related to safety, quality and reliability adhere to world-class standards, meaning they meet the highest levels of safety and quality ensuring smooth and efficient operations. Which train technologies are already in the Indian market? How could you challenge them? With 6�,000 km of track length and a population of a billion plus people, Indian rail roads can certainly adopt technologies that enable more safety, velocity and density. With a vision of improving overall throughput of the rail network, they can certainly work on improving technology in every building block to deliver efficiency. INTERVIEW - GENERAL ELECTRIC TRANSpORTATION How do you think India could reach a more sustainable transport? What are the priorities? Safety is of paramount importance for any rail road; given that, improving velocity and density to deliver better throughput with strong maintenance and usage culture can help sustain a performing rail road. India has to approach this problem in a holistic way and develop the asset installed base in such a way as to deliver overall efficiency that is sustainable from changing social, environmental and economic conditions. Our solutions certainly can help in this direction of improving safety, speed/velocity and network throughput (efficiency). The challenge we have in the country is to create an ecosystem that has the ability to adapt to new technologies and solutions a lot quicker than we do today. Do you think countries should join forces to build rail projects, like China and India just did? Depends on many factors like economics, politics, technology etc. I can comment on technology – there are different technologies available in different countries and one should be wise enough to choose the right technology to solve the problems and constraints that are unique to rail roads in each country. Any other technologies you would like to talk about… The next level of EPA imposed emissions norms is Tier-�, and GE Transportation has launched its solution meeting these norms. It is perhaps the only locomotive product on the planet today offering the Tier-� solution. Needless to say, it boasts state-of-the-art engine technology and system optimization. There are many other smart technologies developed to save fuel, like Trip-Optimizer which is a kind of auto pilot for locomotives. Several advancements are taking place in control systems, software, diagnostics and prognostics to deliver value to our customers. One of our most important solutions is called ‘RailConnect �60’. This solution is based on the Industrial Internet concept, using big data and analytics to arrive at customer value. Combining Physics based algorithms and stochastic data trends provided opportunities to find new ways of creating value for our customers
  • �6 Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - GENERAL ELECTRIC TRANSpORTATION Mr Vageesh Patil - General Manager at GE Transportation GE Transportation is the world leader in manufacturing of diesel electric locomotives and the company has been in the business of locomotives for over 100 years. The Evolution® series locomotive which was introduced in 2005 to meet Tier 2 emission regulations is one such product with modern technology. This locomotive is part of GE’s ecomagination-qualified Evolution® series locomotive family - the best-selling global locomotive platform. Today, more than 5000 Evolution series locomotives operate in the US and globally allowing railroads to move one ton of freight more than 480 miles on a single gallon of fuel. In addition to the engineering talent at JFWTC, GE also tapped its extensive in-house worldwide network of research scientists and engineers —including experts in separate but complementary fields, like aviation, automotive and energy. How would you define smart mobility? Is it just about public transport? In our view, the goal of smart mobility is to provide universal safe, secure mobility and access to jobs/services, for all the people who come to live in urban areas, regardless of income, gender, age, physical conditions. From this perspective, public transport is an important element of smart mobility, but it is not the only element. We consider smart mobility in India would include at least the following (i) Smart mobility planning, utilizing new planning tools and technologies such as GIS, satellite pictures, crowdsourcing through mobile phones, integration with land use planning, etc. (ii) Smart provision of infrastructure and services for clean and efficient transport modes such as public transport/non-motorized transport/green freight transport; (iii) Smart traffic and transport safety management; (iv) Smart travel demand management, utilizing various regulatory, economic, and cooperative tools/incentives to better manage the growth of the ownership and the use of private vehicles; and (v) smart urban/ spatial growth management to encourage the use of clean and efficient transport modes, and to avoid or reduce the unnecessary or undesirable needs for motorized private transport modes.
  • �7 Copyright India Transport Portal Smart cities India 2015 20-22 May, 2015 India’s changing urban landscape will be the next engine of growth for the Indian economy. According to the Ministry of Urban Development, and the National Institute of Urban Affairs (NIUA), more than 50 per cent of India’s population will be living in urban areas by �0�9. With this rapid urbanisation, India is embracing the push to create smart cities. Simultaneously, Indian cities are aggressively looking to improve their infrastructure, as well as the quality of life for their inhabitants. With rapid urbanization, India’s population by �050 will rise to �.6 billion from its current level of �.� billion, resulting in many commercial opportunities available in India for businesses to pursue. The government of India is committed to developing �00 smart cities; satellite towns; rejuvenate existing cities & heritage cities, etc., and has allocated Rs. 6,000 crore for FY �0�5-�6 for the first phase of this development. Smart Cities India �0�5 expo, being organized by Exhibitions India Group (EI) at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, from �0th to ��nd May �0�5 is an appropriate platform to catalyze the Prime Minister’s programs on Smart Cities, Swachh Bharat, Made in India, Digital India, Housing for All, and Make in India. The event will focus on Smarter Solutions for a Better Tomorrow. The three day expo will showcase emerging opportunities for buyers to actively source new and innovative products from India and around the world. Concurrent to the expo, conference sessions will focus on nine verticals including; Smart Governance, Smart Energy, Smart Environment, Smart Transportation, Smart Information Technology & Communications, Smart Buildings, Smart Health and Smart Education. The international expo will attract users, industry buyers, PSUs, central and state government officials, including ministers, secretaries, municipal commissioners, mayors, city planners, architects, builders, etc. The conference will have �50+ distinguished speakers comprising of the world’s foremost strategists, bureaucrats, policy makers, as well as thought leaders and trend setters. The event will witness �5,000 visitors along with �,500 delegates over three days. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), a leading professional service organisation, providing consultancy, assurance and advisory services is the “Knowledge Partner” for Smart Cities India �0�5 expo. PwC will release a “Knowledge Paper” at the inaugural session, and will provide intellectual inputs on the key challenges faced by Indian cities along with highlighting new city governance models for faster development.
  • �8 Copyright India Transport Portal Smart Cities India 2015 Commenting on the association, Rakesh Kaul, Partner, Government and Public Sector, PwC India, said “Conversations around smart cities are increasingly gaining momentum, and we are glad to be spearheading some of the key smart city projects in the country. This association with Exhibitions India Group comes at a time when the government, private sector and citizens alike are looking at balanced growth, with higher standards of living, created in a resource efficient manner. We are confident that platforms like this will help take the dialogue around urbanisation and smart cities to the next level, propelling much needed conversations on policy and technology interventions required to make India’s smart city dreams a reality”. Prem Behl, Chairman, Exhibitions India Pvt Ltd, said; “We are delighted to have PwC as the Knowledge Partner and our grateful to the Indian ministries for their support. We believe that their combined expertise and inputs will add immense value to this expo, which intends to showcase modular and comprehensive solutions to achieve a truly smart and sustainable city.” Smart Cities India �0�5 has been endorsed by the Ministries of Urban Development; New and Renewable Energy; Environment, Forests & Climate Change; the Department of Industrial Policy & Promotion; and the Department of Electronics & Information Technology. About Exhibitions India Group: (EIG) is a trade promotion organisation creating opportunities for investments, joint ventures and technology transfers. EIG is an interface between businesses, government, academia, society, media, etc., and is amongst the few trade fair and conference organisers in India with ISO 900�:�008 & ISO ��00�:�00� certification. EIG has been in existence since �987 and comprises of several strategic business units. EIG is committed to providing satisfaction to its customers by organising focused international quality trade shows through exceptional services, employee involvement, market intelligence and continual improvement. For more information, please visit: http://www.exhibitionsindiagroup. com About PwC: PwC helps organisations and individuals create the value they’re looking for. We’re a network of firms in �57 countries with more than �95,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in Assurance, Tax and Advisory services. Tell us what matters to you and find out more by visiting us at www.pwc.com. In India, PwC has offices in these cities: Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi NCR, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Mumbai and Pune. For more information about PwC India’s service offerings, visit www.pwc.in PwC refers to the PwC network and / or one or more of its member firms, each of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.
  • �9 Copyright India Transport Portal What do you expect from Smart Cities India 2015? Which elements are going to be important during this three-day event? We hope that Smart Cities India �0�5 expo will serve as a constructive forum supporting the governments vision. The smart cities movement is huge, with the potential to transform the nation and lead to socio- economic development and progress. Our objective is for Smart Cities India �0�5 expo to be an appropriate platform for city planners, architects, builders, corporates, and the government. Globally, smart cities is not a new phenomenon, with cities like Barcelona, New York, London, Singapore etc. scoring high on aspects including, livability, sustainability, safety, and technology. Being an international platform, we expect domestic organisations to benefit with exposure to global technology and practices. The Smart Cities India �0�5 expo slogan is «Smarter Solutions for a Better Tomorrow». The three-day expo will showcase opportunities for buyers to source products from India and overseas. The exhibition will have �07 companies exhibiting, with leading names like Lavasa Corporation, Mahindra tech, Mitsubishi Electrics, Bosch and Voltas etc. participating. Separate country pavilions will be created in the exhibitor’s arena like Russian Pavilion, Swedish Pavilion, Swiss Consortium Pavilion and European Business & Technology Centre (EBTC) Pavilion. Concurrent to the expo, conference sessions will focus on nine verticals including; Smart Governance, Smart Energy, Smart Environment, Smart Transportation, Smart Information Technology & Communications, Smart Buildings, Smart Health and Smart Education. Topics like Bottlenecks to transform existing city into a smart city, Aspects of safety, security and surveillance in a Smart City, Green Transport, Smart Urban and Regional Planning and much more will be covered in the conference. Interactive workshops will be conducted by European Business and Technology Centre and Bosch. ��0 distinguished speakers comprising of the world’s foremost strategists, bureaucrats, policy makers, as well as thought leaders and trend setters with �,500 conference delegates in attendance over the three days. The international expo will attract �5,000 trade buyers, PSUs, central and state government officials, including ministers, secretaries, municipal commissioners, mayors, city planners, architects, builders, etc. INTERVIEW - Mr pREM BEHL EXHIBITIONS INDIA GROup How did you get the idea to create an event dedicated to Smart Cities in India? Exhibitions India Group (EIG) was established in �987, and is a trade promotion organization. We encourage investments, joint ventures, technology transfer into India, etc. We conceptualize trade shows and conferences based on a range of parameters, most importantly, market need; the benefits that can accrue to all the stakeholders involved (exhibitors, visitors, speakers, delegates, sponsors etc.). Our platforms are created as catalysts for dissemination of information, knowledge, solutions or trends, and facilitate the convergence of global leaders, professionals, associations, ministries, visitors, media, academia, etc. under one roof. Extensive research enables us to zero in on a particular sector or theme for the expo. We have been researching the need to improve urban infrastructure in India for over 5 years, and visited a number of expos focussed on city development programmes in other parts of the world. These included expos in Europe, USA, the middle east, south east Asia, etc. The focus areas studied at these expos were technologies for smart cities, sustainablliity, green energy, green transport, sensors, green and energy efficient buildings, energy saving technologies, etc. Fortunately, this platform is appropriately timed to contribute to the prime ministers vision on smart cities, sanitation and drinking water (Swachh Bharat), digital India, health for all, housing for all, and make in India. Coupled with this, is the rapid urbanisation forcast of the ministry of urban development the National Institute of Urban Affairs (NIUA) indicating that more than 50 per cent of India’s population will be living in urban areas by �0�9. With this rapid urbanisation, the prime ministers push to create �00 smart cities, expanding existing towns with satellite towns, creating port towns, aerotropolis cities, improving infrastructure in 500 other towns shows astute foresight. The prime minister is aware that India’s changing urban landscape will be the next engine of growth for the Indian economy. Through Smart Cities India �0�5 expo, we intend to demonstrate that it is possible to provide clean water; have efficient solid waste management; utilize low emission public transport; enable a proliferation of electric and hybrid vehicles for public and private use; use clean energy for smart buildings, etc. all of which to be enabled through the use of appropriate ICT technologies. The government is aware of the importance of creating a partnership between the government and the citizen by using communications and information technology to deliver G�C services.
  • �0 Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - EXHIBITIONS INDIA GROup Mr Prem Behl - Chairman of Exhibitions India Group Prem Behl is the Chairman & Managing Director of the Exhibitions India Group – a pioneer in organizing international exhibitions and conferences in India. He is the Managing Director of the Ohio India Office. The Ohio India Office works under the Development Services Agency of the State of Ohio to help companies from the region access channel partners and increase their exports to India. He is also the Managing Director of the Council of Great Lakes Governors (CGLG) India office, which assists the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and Wisconsin companies to access the Indian market. He is currently a Director of the Asian Exhibitions Council (AEC) of the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE-USA). In 2003, he served as the President (Northern India Council) of the Indo- American Chamber of Commerce (IACC), and has been the Chairman & Co-Chairman of the Indo-US Economic Summit in 2006 and 2007 respectively. According to you, what is a smart city? In definition; a ‘smart city’ refers to an urban area that has enhanced conditions of liveability, sustainability and workability. In simple words, it’s a safe city to live in, which provides opportunities that are high in the economic value chain. In India, every single minute, �0 people migrate to cities from rural areas. With this pace of urbanisation, 500 cities will need to be developed in the coming decade, as existing cities will crumble under the pressure of humanity. Digital technologies are just enablers. What is truly needed is a radical solution to a uniquely Indian situation with «smart thinking» and «smart solutions.» Smartness, or better, «urban development» must emanate from ground zero upwards. Therefore, it will be practical to act on basic elements such as hygiene and discipline. A smart city must meet with all requirements, such as safety, hygiene, transport, traffic management, water, environment, housing for all, etc. I believe that emphasis on city transformation in India should not be restricted to certain types of urban areas, but must be inclusive and development proposals must include small cities and villages, where urbanization is already taking place. If this is acted upon, over a period of time, these urban areas will become self-sustainable, and will contribute to the country’s economic growth. In your opinion, how will smart cities change the face of our country? India is a major emerging economy, and it’s time to take a close look at all aspects of this transformation – social, economic and ecological. Smart cities are intended to improve the quality of life by bringing efficiency in sectors such as education, health care, energy, transport, water and waste, etc. People should have access to a comfortable, clean, healthy and safe lifestyle. Aspects such as clean and consistent electricity, good schools, fast emergency responses, low crime rate, clean air and water, multiple entertainment and cultural options, will be part of this enhanced lifestyle. Tourism is one of the largest industries in the world, and urbanizing in a smart way can provide a massive boost to this sector. It wouldn’t by out of place to mention that foreigners, when they visit India, say that ‘they experience a distinct smell.’ This reflects poorly on the image of the country – that we, as a nation, cannot maintain hygiene and cleanliness. Not so long ago, India had a poor image of unreliability as business associates, which has been completely transformed by our software and manufacturing (auto components) professionals and businesses. So, there’s no reason why we can’t work togethe
  • �� REFERENCES http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/in/en/sustainable_cities/ideas/index.html?re=CS1 http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/global/files/us__en_us__cities__FS_IBM_Award_Report.pdf https://www.opendemocracy.net/openindia/mathew-idiculla/crafting-%E2%80%9Csmart-cities%E2%80%9D- india%E2%80%99s-new-urban-vision http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/narendra-modi-imprint-on-smart-city-project/1/382571.html http://www.informationweek.in/informationweek/news-analysis/297909/intelligent-transportation-systems-solve- india-traffic-congestion http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/narendra-modi-imprint-on-smart-city-project/1/382571.html https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/nsdr12/nsdr12-final2.pdf http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/en/transportation_systems/article/palmisano_itsa_speech.html http://docbox.etsi.org/workshop/indo-european%20dialogue%20on%20ict%20standards%20and%20emerging%20te chnologies/07_dibyendu_sengupta_ebtc.pdf http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/transport/its/benefits.aspx http://coeut.iitm.ac.in/ITS_synthesis.pdf http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/intelligent-transport-systems-its-market-764.html http://www.ebtc.eu/blog/insight-intelligent-transport-systems-in-india/ http://www.schneider-electric.com/solutions/ww/en/seg/27947930-smart-cities/27958436-smart-mobility http://www.trust.org/item/20140929114808-aw4ks/ http://www.fullyloaded.com.au/news/new-trucks/1410/volvo-develops-360-degree-anti-collision-scanner/ http://www.urbanmobilityindia.in/Upload/Conference/e1567e5a-42c7-4cb4-bdd1-b73c9d623f03.pdf http://www.smartcitiesindia.com/Conference-Programme.aspx
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  • � A SPECIAL RESEARCH STUDY BY INDIA TRANSPORT PORTAL 2nd edition SMART CITIES AND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT
  • � Copyright India Transport Portal TABLE OF CONTENTS Modi’s ambitious plan – 100 smart cities P3-P5 Interview Schneider Electric – Mr Anil Kadam P6-P7 Smart city concept finds favour world over P8-P9 Interview World Bank India Mr Barjor Mehta and Mr Ke Fang P10-P11 Intelligent transport Systems : Feasible in India ? P12-P14 Interview General Electric Transportation Mr Vageesh Patil P15-P16 Smart Cities India 2015 P17-P18 Interview Exhibitions India Group - Mr Prem Behl P19-P20 References P21
  • � Copyright India Transport Portal Modi’s ambitious plan - 100 smart cities In his budget speech, Union Finance Minister Arjun Jaitley said that “unless new cities are developed to accommodate the burgeoning number of people, the existing cities would soon become unliveable.” Modi wants to build over a �00 smart cities to deal with the rapidly increasing urbanisation, traffic congestion and decreasing quality of people’s lives and the environment. Fiscal constraints demand diligence and that global ‘smart solutions’ be tailored to suit this emerging economy where even basic amenities are hard to come by for millions. Traditional growth drivers are giving way to technologically advanced and creative ones. The defining feature of a smart city is optimisation and strengthening core systems and making them smarter. According to Caragliu et al. (�009), “a city can be defined as ‘smart’ when investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICT) communication infrastructure fuel sustainable economic development and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory action and engagement.” This concept, introduced by IBM in their ‘Smart Planet’ initiative post the economic recession of �008 has become a buzz word in India since the new government has taken control. There is no standard definition as such but key criteria typically include smart economy, smart mobility, smart energy production and conservation, smart living, smart governance, smart healthcare and smart environment. The IBM Institute for Business Value has identified three key components to create smarter cities: instrumentation, interconnection and intelligence. Instrumentation includes sensors, utility meters and other devices to help gather top-quality data. Interconnection involves connecting people, data and systems like never before. Intelligence will help make predictions for better decision making via new computational models and algorithms. Many cities have picked certain aspects of a city to optimize to help run it more efficiently. For example, GE has implemented smart grids for Atlanta. Smart city projects can be either greenfield or brownfield projects. IBM identified seven systems and prerequisites to manage and apply smart solutions to achieve favourable outcomes. The ‘�I’ strategy is the basis of the IBM Smarter Planet vision. The company has partnered with numerous city authorities, offering Smart City solutions to better manage limited resources. IBM’s expected revenue growth for �0�5 is $�0 billion, with the Smarter Planet initiative expected to contribute $7 billion in revenues. A team at Frost & Sullivan has identified parallels—smart city concepts—after studying various smart city projects world over. They defined smart cities as “those that have at least five out of the eight “smart” parameters” shown in the figure, whereas those that implemented at least two of the key aspects were termed eco-friendly cities.
  • � Copyright India Transport Portal Modi’s ambitious plan 100 smart cities Narendra Modi, perhaps one of the most ambitious prime ministers India has ever had, is all set to bring nothing less than a hundred ‘smart cities’ to the country. A ‘grand promise’ he made during his pre-election campaign, the concept of the smart city has been received with mixed reactions. In his speech in June, he said, «Cities in the past were built on riverbanks. They are now built along highways. But in the future, they will be built based on availability of optical fibre networks and next-generation infrastructure.» These technologically advanced cities will obviously be capital- intensive projects. Modi expects to attract investors from abroad and other private players for the INR7060-crore (USD�.� billion) project. The focus will be on smart transport and better amenities. Urban Development Minister, Venkaiah Naidu, said «Emphasis on building smart cities, urban renewal, provision of basic amenities and promoting affordable housing in urban areas is the need of the hour as it is required to meet the aspirations of the countrymen for a better urban living.» Naidu stated that, “The PM wants to take big city living to a new level where ��/7 utility services become an essential in public service delivery. So would be technology-based governance and monitoring of services provided to citizens. Not to miss, a high quality social infrastructure including Wi-Fi zones and recreational spaces form core of the new plans for these cities on the anvil.” He added, “A smart city cannot have only a few hours of water supply a day, or electricity that goes off for several hours, or streets littered with garbage. The general appearance of the city has to be pleasing and clean. In Delhi, it is being proposed that the DDA will develop a new smart city through the land pooling scheme and in that, parts of the NDMC area may also be considered for demonstrating all the components of smart cities.” The selection parameters will vary and will not be one-size-fits-all. The urban growth rate, unique features and the state’s population will be among the deciding factors. Perhaps intelligent transport systems (ITS) solve India’s massive traffic problems and regulate the emission of noxious pollutants. According to the IIM-Transport Corporation of India study conducted in �0��, about INR60,000 crore ($9 billion) are lost annually due to traffic congestion. Zero-Sum ITS, an Ahmedabad- based company, is trying to ascertain if technology could help solve issues that spring from heavy traffic using camera-based traffic sensors and cloud-based control centres. The firm’s Managing Director, Chikara Kikuji, said, “The key goal of the ITS solution being implemented by Zero-Sum is to ensure better traffic management by providing more information to road users and enabling them to plan their trips optimally thereby reducing travel time, saving fuel and decongesting busy roads.” A successful cost-effective, customised ITS can help avoid accidents, handle emergency situations, and manage traffic and traveller information in India. All set to change India’s landscape, the �00 proposed smart cities that will run on technology have IT majors like IBM and Cisco queueing up with smart-city ‘blueprints.’ The CEO of IBM, Virginia Rometty, met with Modi during his recent New York visit to express the company’s interest in «software for Smart Cities and Digital India initiatives.» India already has a few independent smart city projects such as Hindustan Construction Company’s (HCC) Lavasa Smart City in Pune, SAP’s project in Bhopal and Cisco’s project in Electronic City in Bangalore. Obama’s government will help India build smart cities envisioned in Vishakhapatnam, Allahabad and Ajmer. Modi has asked Singapore and France to offer expertise in urban planning for issues such as IT management, energy grids and waste management. Japanese PM, Shinzo Abe, has extended help to turn the city of Varanasi into a smart city while preserving its cultural heritage. In his previous stint as the chief minister of the state of Gujarat, Modi got the ball rolling for the development of India’s first smart city in its industrial corridors - the greenfield 886-acre Gujarat International Finance Tec-city (GIFT) project will be a financial centre. The brownfield 90�-sq.km Dholera SIR will be an extensive industrial area. The focus on urbanization and the competition with China could well give India back its Mojo. In his ‘Election Manifesto’ Modi called Urban Areas ‘High Growth Centres.’ According to the BJP urban policy, “our cities should no longer remain a reflection of poverty and bottlenecks. Rather they should become symbols of efficiency, speed and scale.” Modi wants to create the smart cities in the proposed industrial corridors, which connect major metros, planned for the nation. The government is keen to attract foreign capital to these commercial and industrial nodes. Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) is lending $�.5 billion to the Delhi- Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project and will also help plan three smart cities in the Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor— Krishnapatnam (Andhra Pradesh), Ponneri (Tamil Nadu) and Tumkur (Karnataka) in the Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor. Great Britain will offer to help India to develop the Bangalore-Mumbai Economic Corridor.
  • 5 Modi’s ambitious plan 100 smart cities Copyright India Transport Portal Research indicates that 70 percent of the population could well be living in cities by �050 and 50 percent by �0�9 in India. The increasing levels of migration from rural to urban areas have been the impetus for the development of smart cities. The PM’s idea of ‘hyper-urbanisation’ has not really instilled nationwide optimism as housing and amenities for all, as promised by the development of smart city projects, could turn out to be an expensive pledge in a country where nearly �70 million people live below the poverty line. Others argue that with the world experiencing the ‘age of digitization,’ the concept of the smart city - eco-friendly, sustainable urban settlements - could well be the answer to assure people that their basic needs will be met. In India, the construction of smart cities will have plenty of challenges to overcome. How far will all the stakeholders work towards implementing ‘smart technology’? Will the people contribute effectively to the sustainable use of resources? Time also has to be factored in as these projects will most likely take �0–�0 years to become a reality.
  • 6 Copyright India Transport Portal 100 smart cities are planned to be built in India…Have you already been involved in Smart cities around the world? If yes, how? Do you think India has the potential to achieve this huge objective? In less than �0 years, 70% of the world’s population will reside in our cities. This rapid migration will push both current and future urban centres to their seams and expand industrial and residential infrastructures beyond their breaking points. Cities face huge challenges: congestion, pollution, blackouts, crime, debt, and rising costs - while competing with each other for investment, jobs, and talents. The growth and its challenges raise important questions that must be considered by cities around the world. Schneider Electric has its hand in more than �00 smart city projects around the world, notably Beijing, Dallas, Grenoble and Rio de Janeiro. It offers a range of technologies toward this end, such as its new Building Analytics software and services, which pull information from building sensors, utility meters and control systems. It also is skilled in energy savings performance contracting, in which the company assumes the capital risk for building or infrastructure improvements in exchange for fees based on the money those investments save along the way. How would you define a smart city? How is it different from an “intelligent city” or a “digital city”? In my view a ‘Smart City’ is an urban area that is highly rated in terms of overall infrastructure, sustainable real estate, communication technology and market viability. It is a city where information technology is the fundamental framework and the basis for providing necessary services to residents. The essential difference between a smart city and a ‘digital’ or ’intelligent’ city is that a smart city is one that completely runs on technology—be it for power, water, sanitation and waste treatment, ��/7 water supply, traffic and transport. Smart mobility seems to cover many challenges India is facing in terms of transport (road construction, traffic, safety). What are your concrete solutions to set up smart mobility? The sharp spike in the number of vehicles on the roads of the metropolitans has become a matter of concern for the respective state governments. The infrastructure and traffic management systems present in these cities are not being able to cope with the traffic bottlenecks and more importantly, the rising level of road accidents. INTERVIEW - SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC being able to cope with the traffic bottlenecks and more importantly, the rising level of road accidents. Smart Mobility has become the need of the hour and the state governments as well as the centre are looking to implement these solutions across all metros in order to improve the urban traffic situation of the country. Schneider Electric has provided such solution in one of the busiest suburbs of India in South Mumbai. The municipal corporation of Greater Mumbai was facing a number of problems due to chronic traffic snarls. They decided to approach Schneider Electric India in order to facilitate traffic management flow in the city. Schneider Electric came up with an Adaptive Traffic Control System (ATCS) which modifies traffic signal cycles in real time by means of surveillance sensors or devices installed on site to respond to changing traffic conditions. ATCS was designed in such a manner that a master controller could regulate traffic control coming in from all directions. The installation of this system resulted in a �0% increase in average traffic speed and a �7% reduction in travel times in the region. Are you involved in digital and intelligent transport systems? Schneider Electric offers �0 years of demonstrated expertise in developing, deploying, and supporting complex transportation management solutions in Europe, North and South America, Asia- Pacific, and the Middle East – with intelligent transportation systems (ITS) successfully managing some of the world’s most complex and congested markets. Schneider Electric Traffic solutions are helping to optimize daily traffic conditions, increase customer satisfaction, enhance road safety, and protect the environment at installations serving: • Sao Paulo Urban Transportation Center (Brazil) • Panama City UTC • Madrid Mobility Management Center (Spain) • Rosario UTC Project (Argentina) • Lebanon UTC Project • Beijing Supercenter (Mobility Management Project)
  • 7 Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC Mr Anil Kadam Senior Manager – Solution Architect (Utilities) Anil Kadam is Senior Manager - Solution Architect for Energy and Utilities (Smart Grids) at Schneider Electric. He has over 12 years of experience in the field of Energy Automation, Energy Management and Smart Grid. Mr Kadam specializes in the field of Smart Grid and Smart Cities, which form the central need of the present-day urban challenges. He has presented multiple papers and delivered several lectures in the field of Smart Grid. He has also worked with several Energy Automation & Infrastructure companies in the past. Some of these include - Marketing/Sales Manager - Substation Automation Solutions, with ABB India; Marketing Manager - Substation Automation Solutions, with Areva-T&D UK; Manager - Technical Marketing/Projects - N/W Automation & Protection Systems, Easun Reyrolle Ltd India etc. What are the top priorities in India in terms of transport and your potential solutions? What smart cities could bring to these issues? India is a huge market for us in terms of investment and business. The ATCS developed by us has been working in south Mumbai in the Colaba area over a stretch of about �� km after the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai awarded the project in �007. Apart from improved traffic flow, the south Mumbai area has also reported reduced air pollution due to the ATCS. Our top priority is to implement such solutions across the metropolitan cities in India in order to solve the traffic problem and safety issues which have existed in India for a very long time now. Our aim behind the creation of Smart Cities is to turn conventional Indian cities in to livable, efficient & sustainable cities thereby delivering benefits to all of the stakeholders.
  • 8 Smart city concept finds favour world over A smart city, as described in The Hindu, “is an urban region that is highly advanced in terms of overall infrastructure, sustainable real estate, communications and market viability; it is a city where information technology is the principal infrastructure and the basis for providing essential services to residents.” Inspired by emerging smart cities across the globe - in China, Amsterdam and the Emirates, Modi’s NDA government has proposed a hundred such cities across the country. India’s new BJP government is keen on helping India catch up with technologically advanced countries as soon as possible. Urbanization in India is expected to be over 75 percent before we hit �0�0. Economy is growing and Prime Minister Modi has ambitious, progressive plans for his country including building �00 smart cities - cities that are liveable, efficient and sustainable. According to Schneider Electric, vision, integration, solutions, innovation and collaboration will make a city ‘smart.’ How far this urban utopia will be successful in a country that is victim to serious issues such as poverty and lack of basic amenities is a subject of heated discussion in India. But Modi has brought with him a kind of urban awakening modelled on the top notch quality of global cities such as those seen in China, the Gulf and Europe. The face of urban China is changing with many technologically advanced smart cities planned for the country. The Chinese government considers it a ‘key national policy.’ The Chinese National Bureau of Statistics in �0�� said that the country’s rate of urbanisation had already exceeded 50 percent and perhaps for the first time, there were more people in China’s cities than its villages. Building smart cities will help cities with millions of inhabitants grow in a sustainable manner and deal with traffic congestion, pollution and housing problems efficiently. Not to be left behind, the Middle East is also implementing its share of smart city projects. Economic progress, energy efficiency and generating employment are key focus areas for the Emirates. In Saudi Arabia, there are six smart cities coming up; in Qatar, there are three—Lusail’s Smart and Sustainable City, Energy City Qatar, and Pearl-Qatar Island; and, in the United Arab Emirates, two have been proposed—Smart city Dubai and Masdar City in Abu Dhabi. Costing under $�0 billion, the Masdar project—a ‘sustainable’ city aiming to be ‘the first zero-carbon, zero-waste city’—is expected to be complete by �0�5. In Europe, Amsterdam has its urban model of the future ready. The Amsterdam Smart city is a sustainable platform where ‘innovators’ are ready with smart solutions to tackle urban issues and improve ‘liveability’ of the city; they are involved in nearly 70 projects. Copenhagen, Stockholm and Vienna, among the greenest cities in the world, are also rapidly adopting the smart lifestyle. Copyright India Transport Portal
  • 9 SMART CITy CONCEpT FINDS FAVOuR WORLD OVER How will a densely populated emerging economy like India achieve its dream of building over a hundred smart cities? “The real estate of the future cannot be built with the building blocks of the past. Progressive formats such as smart cities are the result of vast knowledge and know-how. In a developing country like India, where the more advanced concepts of urbanisation are still work in progress, the inputs required for the success of futuristic concepts are, at best, spread thinly on the ground,” says Anuj Puri of real estate company Jones Lang LaSalle-India. He added: “The Ministry of Urban Development must move forward on a highly consultative basis and allow these inputs to flow freely. Moreover, the blueprints that have worked on foreign shores must be feasibly interpreted in the Indian context — nothing in this respect can simply be imported and made to work here.” Modi, who was rather ‘dazzled’ after his �0�� China visit, initiated India’s first smart city —GIFT — in his home state of Gujarat. But India’s metropolises are basically plagued by myriad civic woes, and most analysts believe that making these existing cities habitable should be given more importance than investing millions in ‘flashy’ projects. Copyright India Transport Portal
  • �0 Narendra Modi’s project of building 100 smart cities in India is very ambitious. How do you think India can achieve it? What does it mean for India’s urbanization from your expert’s point of view? Based on media reports and public speeches of the Hon. Minister of Urban Development, it appears that the GoI is planning to facilitate �00 existing cities to develop governance, administrative systems and processes and ensure effective delivery of services such as water, solid waste, street lighting and urban mobility, among others, in a smart way. With strong policy support, assistance and catalytic financing from the central government, coupled with strong buy in from and ownership by state governments, a program to develop �00 smart cities, which can become role models for other cities, is very feasible. Smart cities seem to embrace many realities: infrastructure, transport, growth…How can such global projects be developed and realized? Under India’s constitution, urban development is a state subject and the central government has a role in formulation of national urban policies, providing guidance and coordinating capacity building. Role of state governments is critical and essential. Each state government would have to determine the nature of support that can be provided to cities within their state. Therefore, to be successful, a national program such as �00 smart cities requires active consultations with and strong support from state governments. Given that India’s different states are developing at varying speeds and are forging their own paths, a national program will be required to be flexible and adaptable. Some cities around the world are already considered as smart cities… Which cities in the world could be considered as smart cities? What India could learn from their experiences? (good and bad practices) There is no global commonly accepted and applicable definition of a smart city. What may be considered as smart in one country may not be acceptable in other countries. Each country, therefore, has to arrive at a national consensus and work towards reaching that goal. Moreover, what constitutes smartness today may be very different a decade from now. Therefore, India will have to set itself a definition for its cities but with a clear understanding that the definition will need modification over the implementation period. INTERVIEW - WORLD BANK INDIA Is the World Bank going to be involved in this huge project in India? If yes, in what way? In a meeting between the Hon. Prime Minister of India and the visiting President of the World Bank, it was agreed that the Bank would continue supporting the Government of India’s efforts in developing its urban agenda. We will be involved both in terms of knowledge sharing from across the world as well as in possible future investments. On October �, �0��, the Bank organized an International Knowledge Exchange on Smart Cities in New Delhi where international experts and practitioners with field experience of developing smart cities exchanged information and experiences with their Indian counterparts from the Government of India as well as state governments. About transportation…It seems to be a huge part and stake of smart cities, especially in India where the road construction pace is still considered as too weak, where roads are not safe, rail needs massive investment. How can smart cities accelerate and improve their transport system? You are right. Indian cities need a lot of transport infrastructure, and they need to be constructed very quickly in order to catch up with the rapid growing urban transport needs. We understand one of the purposes of this “�00 Smart Cities” program is to accelerate and improve transport systems in Indian cities. International experiences have shown this goal can be achieved through improvements in all aspects of urban transport development, from planning, financing, institutions, regulations, to operations. We believe innovations, in terms of the ways to maximize the benefits from all existing natural, financing, human, and technological resources and minimizing negative impacts on society and the natural environment, would play a very critical role, if this �00 Smart Cities were to achieve the desired results. Copyright India Transport Portal
  • �� Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - WORLD BANK INDIA How would you define smart mobility? Is it just about public transport? In our view, the goal of smart mobility is to provide universal safe, secure mobility and access to jobs/services, for all the people who come to live in urban areas, regardless of income, gender, age, physical conditions. From this perspective, public transport is an important element of smart mobility, but it is not the only element. We consider smart mobility in India would include at least the following (i) Smart mobility planning, utilizing new planning tools and technologies such as GIS, satellite pictures, crowdsourcing through mobile phones, integration with land use planning, etc. (ii) Smart provision of infrastructure and services for clean and efficient transport modes such as public transport/non-motorized transport/green freight transport; (iii) Smart traffic and transport safety management; (iv) Smart travel demand management, utilizing various regulatory, economic, and cooperative tools/incentives to better manage the growth of the ownership and the use of private vehicles; and (v) smart urban/ spatial growth management to encourage the use of clean and efficient transport modes, and to avoid or reduce the unnecessary or undesirable needs for motorized private transport modes. Question nos. 1, 2,3 and 4 were answered by Barjor Mehta, Lead Urban Specialist, World Bank and 5-6 to Ke Fang, Lead Transport Specialist, World Bank.
  • �� Copyright India Transport Portal Intelligent transport systems: Feasible in India? The EU Directorate General for Mobility and Transport defines intelligent transport systems (ITS) as “several combinations of communication, computer and control technology developed and applied in the domain of transport to improve system performance, transport safety, efficiency, productivity, and level of service, environmental impacts, energy consumption, and mobility.” Will PM Modi’s ambitious plans for smart cities and intelligent mobility be feasible? As of now, various ITS initiatives have been successfully implemented or are in the pilot stages in various metro cities across India. It’s but natural that transport discussions will veer towards smart mobility with the current buzz word being ‘smart cities’. Increasing levels of urbanization necessitate the need for intelligent transport systems that enhance the social, economic and cultural life of a city. Smart mobility integrates clean energy technology into a traffic system that is multimodal. To ensure that mobility issues related to safety and pollution are a thing of the past, agencies world over have invested time and money to come up with innovative, efficient transport solutions. Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) will integrate electronics, computer technology and management strategies to bring about seamless and efficient connectivity that has minimal negative impact on the economic, demographic, social and environmental dimensions of a country. Though the world is in the initial stages of this phenomenal process of transformation for the movement of both people and freight, researchers and other relevant stakeholders are giving it their all to turn this vision into reality. ITS Canada’s Strategic Business Plan defines ITS as “the application of advanced and emerging technologies (computers, sensors, control, communications, and electronic devices) in transportation to save lives, time, money, energy and the environment.” They are often found as stand-alone applications because they are less expensive; but they need to be thought of in terms of system integration in the long run. Examples of ITS technologies include communication technologies in ITS like microwaves, short-range radio waves, DSRC, mobile communications and the Internet; global navigation technology for automatically locating vehicles and tracking, geographical information systems, data acquisition and exchange, camera systems and artificial vision, in-vehicle systems and digital mapping. According to the World Bank, ITS can be divided into nine areas: traveller information, traffic management, demand management, road management, advanced driving assistance, electronic financial transactions, commercial vehicle management, public transport management and incident and hazard response.
  • �� INTELLIGENT TRANSpORT SySTEM FEASIBLE IN INDIA? Copyright India Transport Portal Be it a developed or developing country, the reasons for deploying ITS are similar as they offer far more benefits than conventional transportation systems. People need reliable, affordable and convenient transportation and efficient movement of freight to go about their lives and better mobility will undoubtedly enhance the quality of their lives, especially for people with special needs. The benefits of IT systems are plenty - they offer safety, security and environmental protection. ITS can reduce road crashes, alert emergency services, ease traffic flows, and open up alternate routes; they can bring down costs incurred due to delays in work flow and productivity thanks to traffic congestion; and, they can lead to a �0-percent decline in GHG emissions and minimize fuel loss due to stop-start driving. Users can enjoy increased efficiency with systems like electronic toll collection, smart cards and in-vehicle navigation. Traffic management and information and warning systems in vehicles are also stand-alone applications that are part of ITS. The concept of e-mobility will ideally address fuel efficiency and emission standards. Perhaps the future will belong to electro mobility, which refers to “using electric powertrain technologies, in- vehicle information, and communication technologies and connected infrastructures to enable the electric propulsion of vehicles and fleets.” Most major auto makers have plug-in hybrids, electric vehicles and those that use the hydrogen fuel cell. Any process that will save time, lives and money will warrant an effective application in the lives of people everywhere. The authorities will have to implement both road and vehicle-based systems in a coordinated manner to provide society-wide benefits. technology that is the key component of ITS can help lay the groundwork for these transport systems. Increasing the efficiency for both users and operators is naturally a win–win situation. Information technology that is the key component of ITS can help lay the groundwork for these transport systems. Increasing the efficiency for both users and operators is naturally a win–win situation. The World Bank supports this new dependence on knowledge rather capital. Research and development, transfer of technology, education, and exchange of information are supported by the development of IT. The requirement for ITS can foster new local businesses that manufacture the equipment as well open avenues for renovation and maintenance in the future. The deployment of intelligent transport systems can enhance regional integration and the dissemination of information technology. There are a few prerequisites - institutional and technological - for the deployment of ITS. In developing countries like India, the lack of basic infrastructure is aggravated by the limited availability of technical and financial resources. At the same time, retrofitting that could prove expensive in developed countries (with adequate infrastructure) can be avoided as electronic and physical infrastructure will likely be installed simultaneously. Also, updating existing systems is often more expensive than starting from scratch. They can exploit information available from the first-mover countries. These reasons often help developing countries ‘leapfrog’ to intelligent transport systems far quicker. All the advantages afforded by ITS are not always transportation related but economic and social. With vehicle ownership burgeoning in India, the impact on the lives of its citizens is not trivial. The gravity of the impact of climate change and rising numbers of people moving to urban areas have India’s new government proposing the building of smart cities for the future, modelled on smart cities in more developed parts of the world.
  • �� Copyright India Transport Portal INTELLIGENT TRANSpORT SySTEM FEASIBLE IN INDIA? This emerging economy has to come up with financially prudent solutions in the form of public policy that addresses India’s expanding population and other constraints. In India, ITS can be successfully used for intersection control, incident detection, vehicle classification, monitoring, revenue collection and collating historical traffic data. From the commuter’s perspective, ITS can help in estimating travel times, selecting optimal routes, providing congestion maps and information about public transport, individual vehicle management and accident handling. For example, Volvo’s �60 degree anti-collision scanner will scan the surroundings of a truck to help prevent accidents that occur due to limited vision, and this technology is in the test phase. Companies like IBM, Cisco Systems and Schneider Electric offer smart mobility solutions by improving the efficiency of operations and providing ‘smart information.’ IBM introduced the smart city concept. Schneider Electric helps better air quality and reduces traffic congestion related issues ‘through centralised, real-time adaptive traffic management.’ The company also offers highly accurate tolling systems, tools to ‘manage and secure’ bridge and tunnel sites, smart traveller information and solutions for integrated city mobility management. Cisco believes that pretty much everything in the world will be connected by the Internet soon - the Internet of Everything (IoE) will ‘bring together people, process, data and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable.’ The American company works with innovators worldwide to set up smart cities - Bangalore, the silicon valley of India, will get the Cisco Smart City. Some of the ITS initiatives that have helped regulate traffic and reduce accidents in India include the Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) project planned for all the national highways with the concept being tested on NH-5 on the Chandigarh- Parwanoo bit. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based ETC is already being tested on the 95-km Ahmedabad- Mumbai stretch. Bus Rapid Transport Corridors have been implemented in Pune, Ahmedabad, Delhi and Indore. Advanced Parking Management Systems in Delhi can be found in Palika Bazaar, which uses Electronic Parking Guidance and VMS Smart Cards to accommodate �500 vehicles, and in Sarojini Nagar Market, which has automated multi-level parking. Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) deployed city-wide ITS in Mysore to better its bus system in �0��. The ITS Master plan in Hyderabad (CCTVs, ATCC, weather stations, and flood and pollution sensors) will be implemented in three phases at a cost of around EUR��0 million. The B-TRAC project by the Bangalore Traffic Police uses speed interceptors, cameras, centrally controlled traffic signalling, citations and mobile enforcement. The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) plans to bring �67 busy signals under the Area Traffic Control (ATC) that will help commuters save time by not having to wait at these signals at a cost of around INR5.66 crore (~USD0.9� billion). Modi’s vision of a �00 smart cities across India is slowly gathering support. During Modi’s recent 5-day visit to Japan, Shinzo Abe, the Japanese PM, pledged $�� billion to improve India’s infrastructure and will include helping Modi realise his smart-city dream. Japan will enable India’s initiative to develop urban areas by offering ‘multi-modal transport solutions.’ PM Modi hopes that using computational technologies, wireless communication and sensing technology to meet the challenges of rapid urbanisation and motorisation will take India to a better tomorrow. With cost and space constraints, the ITS models followed in developed countries cannot be applied without modification to managing traffic in India. India is expected to surpass China soon as the fastest growing economy in the world. The transportation demands will be huge with the rapid migration to urban areas and the massive number of vehicles on the roads. India has a road network that is underdeveloped, budget that is severely restricted, lack of awareness among users, lack of interest among policy makers, poor demand for automation and limited resources for operation and maintenance of the technology. India’s current attempts at deploying intelligent transportation systems show a lot of promise. Western ITS standards are unlikely to work in India unless they are tailored to suit its physical, lifestyle and cultural diversity. The decision makers will have to come up with timelines that are realistic and schedules that take a step-by-step approach, understand the needs of all stakeholders and appreciate the constraints before blindly embracing the concept of digitization. In theory, the idea of smart cities and smart mobility is fantastic, but how far they will be feasible or successful in reality is anybody’s guess.
  • �5 Copyright India Transport Portal Could you introduce yourself briefly and tell us about your activities at GE Transportation in India? GE Transportation is a $5B business engaged in delivering diesel electric locomotives, mining systems, signaling solutions, marine & stationary engines, services technologies and solutions. We are �0,000 employees strong, including �,�00 engineers worldwide. In India, I lead the GE Transportation Engineering team of ~800 engineers who work on design, development and validation of diesel electric locomotives, signaling & rail solutions and mining systems. We are continuously investing in developing capability, capacity and competency to deliver state-of-the-art locomotive technologies, systems and solutions to the business. You have been part of the launch of latest technology products such as Evolution Series locomotives. What are their main features? How different are they from locomotives actually commercialized and used in India? The Evolution Series locomotives are Tier-� emission compliant, with most fuel efficiency, high reliability and optimized life cycle cost. They have been designed with state-of-the-art control technologies with on-board and off-board diagnostics, motor driven auxiliaries and optimized packaging to achieve right balance and efficient system performance. These locomotives are an order ahead in technology and performance compared to commercialized locomotives in India. How are your products sustainable for the transportation industry? Diesel electric locomotives are designed for �0 years of life with high reliability and very well defined maintenance schedules. Adhering to proper maintenance and managing the right usage, these locomotives are not only sustainable on rail roads but also deliver enough power to meet haulage requirements. The locomotives adapt to different climatic conditions as it is an important input in our design process to ensure performance doesn’t get impacted in harsh operating environments. Emissions meet EPA norms at all times, hence these locomotives are very environment friendly. All aspects of design related to safety, quality and reliability adhere to world-class standards, meaning they meet the highest levels of safety and quality ensuring smooth and efficient operations. Which train technologies are already in the Indian market? How could you challenge them? With 6�,000 km of track length and a population of a billion plus people, Indian rail roads can certainly adopt technologies that enable more safety, velocity and density. With a vision of improving overall throughput of the rail network, they can certainly work on improving technology in every building block to deliver efficiency. INTERVIEW - GENERAL ELECTRIC TRANSpORTATION How do you think India could reach a more sustainable transport? What are the priorities? Safety is of paramount importance for any rail road; given that, improving velocity and density to deliver better throughput with strong maintenance and usage culture can help sustain a performing rail road. India has to approach this problem in a holistic way and develop the asset installed base in such a way as to deliver overall efficiency that is sustainable from changing social, environmental and economic conditions. Our solutions certainly can help in this direction of improving safety, speed/velocity and network throughput (efficiency). The challenge we have in the country is to create an ecosystem that has the ability to adapt to new technologies and solutions a lot quicker than we do today. Do you think countries should join forces to build rail projects, like China and India just did? Depends on many factors like economics, politics, technology etc. I can comment on technology – there are different technologies available in different countries and one should be wise enough to choose the right technology to solve the problems and constraints that are unique to rail roads in each country. Any other technologies you would like to talk about… The next level of EPA imposed emissions norms is Tier-�, and GE Transportation has launched its solution meeting these norms. It is perhaps the only locomotive product on the planet today offering the Tier-� solution. Needless to say, it boasts state-of-the-art engine technology and system optimization. There are many other smart technologies developed to save fuel, like Trip-Optimizer which is a kind of auto pilot for locomotives. Several advancements are taking place in control systems, software, diagnostics and prognostics to deliver value to our customers. One of our most important solutions is called ‘RailConnect �60’. This solution is based on the Industrial Internet concept, using big data and analytics to arrive at customer value. Combining Physics based algorithms and stochastic data trends provided opportunities to find new ways of creating value for our customers
  • �6 Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - GENERAL ELECTRIC TRANSpORTATION Mr Vageesh Patil - General Manager at GE Transportation GE Transportation is the world leader in manufacturing of diesel electric locomotives and the company has been in the business of locomotives for over 100 years. The Evolution® series locomotive which was introduced in 2005 to meet Tier 2 emission regulations is one such product with modern technology. This locomotive is part of GE’s ecomagination-qualified Evolution® series locomotive family - the best-selling global locomotive platform. Today, more than 5000 Evolution series locomotives operate in the US and globally allowing railroads to move one ton of freight more than 480 miles on a single gallon of fuel. In addition to the engineering talent at JFWTC, GE also tapped its extensive in-house worldwide network of research scientists and engineers —including experts in separate but complementary fields, like aviation, automotive and energy. How would you define smart mobility? Is it just about public transport? In our view, the goal of smart mobility is to provide universal safe, secure mobility and access to jobs/services, for all the people who come to live in urban areas, regardless of income, gender, age, physical conditions. From this perspective, public transport is an important element of smart mobility, but it is not the only element. We consider smart mobility in India would include at least the following (i) Smart mobility planning, utilizing new planning tools and technologies such as GIS, satellite pictures, crowdsourcing through mobile phones, integration with land use planning, etc. (ii) Smart provision of infrastructure and services for clean and efficient transport modes such as public transport/non-motorized transport/green freight transport; (iii) Smart traffic and transport safety management; (iv) Smart travel demand management, utilizing various regulatory, economic, and cooperative tools/incentives to better manage the growth of the ownership and the use of private vehicles; and (v) smart urban/ spatial growth management to encourage the use of clean and efficient transport modes, and to avoid or reduce the unnecessary or undesirable needs for motorized private transport modes.
  • �7 Copyright India Transport Portal Smart cities India 2015 20-22 May, 2015 India’s changing urban landscape will be the next engine of growth for the Indian economy. According to the Ministry of Urban Development, and the National Institute of Urban Affairs (NIUA), more than 50 per cent of India’s population will be living in urban areas by �0�9. With this rapid urbanisation, India is embracing the push to create smart cities. Simultaneously, Indian cities are aggressively looking to improve their infrastructure, as well as the quality of life for their inhabitants. With rapid urbanization, India’s population by �050 will rise to �.6 billion from its current level of �.� billion, resulting in many commercial opportunities available in India for businesses to pursue. The government of India is committed to developing �00 smart cities; satellite towns; rejuvenate existing cities & heritage cities, etc., and has allocated Rs. 6,000 crore for FY �0�5-�6 for the first phase of this development. Smart Cities India �0�5 expo, being organized by Exhibitions India Group (EI) at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, from �0th to ��nd May �0�5 is an appropriate platform to catalyze the Prime Minister’s programs on Smart Cities, Swachh Bharat, Made in India, Digital India, Housing for All, and Make in India. The event will focus on Smarter Solutions for a Better Tomorrow. The three day expo will showcase emerging opportunities for buyers to actively source new and innovative products from India and around the world. Concurrent to the expo, conference sessions will focus on nine verticals including; Smart Governance, Smart Energy, Smart Environment, Smart Transportation, Smart Information Technology & Communications, Smart Buildings, Smart Health and Smart Education. The international expo will attract users, industry buyers, PSUs, central and state government officials, including ministers, secretaries, municipal commissioners, mayors, city planners, architects, builders, etc. The conference will have �50+ distinguished speakers comprising of the world’s foremost strategists, bureaucrats, policy makers, as well as thought leaders and trend setters. The event will witness �5,000 visitors along with �,500 delegates over three days. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), a leading professional service organisation, providing consultancy, assurance and advisory services is the “Knowledge Partner” for Smart Cities India �0�5 expo. PwC will release a “Knowledge Paper” at the inaugural session, and will provide intellectual inputs on the key challenges faced by Indian cities along with highlighting new city governance models for faster development.
  • �8 Copyright India Transport Portal Smart Cities India 2015 Commenting on the association, Rakesh Kaul, Partner, Government and Public Sector, PwC India, said “Conversations around smart cities are increasingly gaining momentum, and we are glad to be spearheading some of the key smart city projects in the country. This association with Exhibitions India Group comes at a time when the government, private sector and citizens alike are looking at balanced growth, with higher standards of living, created in a resource efficient manner. We are confident that platforms like this will help take the dialogue around urbanisation and smart cities to the next level, propelling much needed conversations on policy and technology interventions required to make India’s smart city dreams a reality”. Prem Behl, Chairman, Exhibitions India Pvt Ltd, said; “We are delighted to have PwC as the Knowledge Partner and our grateful to the Indian ministries for their support. We believe that their combined expertise and inputs will add immense value to this expo, which intends to showcase modular and comprehensive solutions to achieve a truly smart and sustainable city.” Smart Cities India �0�5 has been endorsed by the Ministries of Urban Development; New and Renewable Energy; Environment, Forests & Climate Change; the Department of Industrial Policy & Promotion; and the Department of Electronics & Information Technology. About Exhibitions India Group: (EIG) is a trade promotion organisation creating opportunities for investments, joint ventures and technology transfers. EIG is an interface between businesses, government, academia, society, media, etc., and is amongst the few trade fair and conference organisers in India with ISO 900�:�008 & ISO ��00�:�00� certification. EIG has been in existence since �987 and comprises of several strategic business units. EIG is committed to providing satisfaction to its customers by organising focused international quality trade shows through exceptional services, employee involvement, market intelligence and continual improvement. For more information, please visit: http://www.exhibitionsindiagroup. com About PwC: PwC helps organisations and individuals create the value they’re looking for. We’re a network of firms in �57 countries with more than �95,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in Assurance, Tax and Advisory services. Tell us what matters to you and find out more by visiting us at www.pwc.com. In India, PwC has offices in these cities: Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi NCR, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Mumbai and Pune. For more information about PwC India’s service offerings, visit www.pwc.in PwC refers to the PwC network and / or one or more of its member firms, each of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.
  • �9 Copyright India Transport Portal What do you expect from Smart Cities India 2015? Which elements are going to be important during this three-day event? We hope that Smart Cities India �0�5 expo will serve as a constructive forum supporting the governments vision. The smart cities movement is huge, with the potential to transform the nation and lead to socio- economic development and progress. Our objective is for Smart Cities India �0�5 expo to be an appropriate platform for city planners, architects, builders, corporates, and the government. Globally, smart cities is not a new phenomenon, with cities like Barcelona, New York, London, Singapore etc. scoring high on aspects including, livability, sustainability, safety, and technology. Being an international platform, we expect domestic organisations to benefit with exposure to global technology and practices. The Smart Cities India �0�5 expo slogan is «Smarter Solutions for a Better Tomorrow». The three-day expo will showcase opportunities for buyers to source products from India and overseas. The exhibition will have �07 companies exhibiting, with leading names like Lavasa Corporation, Mahindra tech, Mitsubishi Electrics, Bosch and Voltas etc. participating. Separate country pavilions will be created in the exhibitor’s arena like Russian Pavilion, Swedish Pavilion, Swiss Consortium Pavilion and European Business & Technology Centre (EBTC) Pavilion. Concurrent to the expo, conference sessions will focus on nine verticals including; Smart Governance, Smart Energy, Smart Environment, Smart Transportation, Smart Information Technology & Communications, Smart Buildings, Smart Health and Smart Education. Topics like Bottlenecks to transform existing city into a smart city, Aspects of safety, security and surveillance in a Smart City, Green Transport, Smart Urban and Regional Planning and much more will be covered in the conference. Interactive workshops will be conducted by European Business and Technology Centre and Bosch. ��0 distinguished speakers comprising of the world’s foremost strategists, bureaucrats, policy makers, as well as thought leaders and trend setters with �,500 conference delegates in attendance over the three days. The international expo will attract �5,000 trade buyers, PSUs, central and state government officials, including ministers, secretaries, municipal commissioners, mayors, city planners, architects, builders, etc. INTERVIEW - Mr pREM BEHL EXHIBITIONS INDIA GROup How did you get the idea to create an event dedicated to Smart Cities in India? Exhibitions India Group (EIG) was established in �987, and is a trade promotion organization. We encourage investments, joint ventures, technology transfer into India, etc. We conceptualize trade shows and conferences based on a range of parameters, most importantly, market need; the benefits that can accrue to all the stakeholders involved (exhibitors, visitors, speakers, delegates, sponsors etc.). Our platforms are created as catalysts for dissemination of information, knowledge, solutions or trends, and facilitate the convergence of global leaders, professionals, associations, ministries, visitors, media, academia, etc. under one roof. Extensive research enables us to zero in on a particular sector or theme for the expo. We have been researching the need to improve urban infrastructure in India for over 5 years, and visited a number of expos focussed on city development programmes in other parts of the world. These included expos in Europe, USA, the middle east, south east Asia, etc. The focus areas studied at these expos were technologies for smart cities, sustainablliity, green energy, green transport, sensors, green and energy efficient buildings, energy saving technologies, etc. Fortunately, this platform is appropriately timed to contribute to the prime ministers vision on smart cities, sanitation and drinking water (Swachh Bharat), digital India, health for all, housing for all, and make in India. Coupled with this, is the rapid urbanisation forcast of the ministry of urban development the National Institute of Urban Affairs (NIUA) indicating that more than 50 per cent of India’s population will be living in urban areas by �0�9. With this rapid urbanisation, the prime ministers push to create �00 smart cities, expanding existing towns with satellite towns, creating port towns, aerotropolis cities, improving infrastructure in 500 other towns shows astute foresight. The prime minister is aware that India’s changing urban landscape will be the next engine of growth for the Indian economy. Through Smart Cities India �0�5 expo, we intend to demonstrate that it is possible to provide clean water; have efficient solid waste management; utilize low emission public transport; enable a proliferation of electric and hybrid vehicles for public and private use; use clean energy for smart buildings, etc. all of which to be enabled through the use of appropriate ICT technologies. The government is aware of the importance of creating a partnership between the government and the citizen by using communications and information technology to deliver G�C services.
  • �0 Copyright India Transport Portal INTERVIEW - EXHIBITIONS INDIA GROup Mr Prem Behl - Chairman of Exhibitions India Group Prem Behl is the Chairman & Managing Director of the Exhibitions India Group – a pioneer in organizing international exhibitions and conferences in India. He is the Managing Director of the Ohio India Office. The Ohio India Office works under the Development Services Agency of the State of Ohio to help companies from the region access channel partners and increase their exports to India. He is also the Managing Director of the Council of Great Lakes Governors (CGLG) India office, which assists the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and Wisconsin companies to access the Indian market. He is currently a Director of the Asian Exhibitions Council (AEC) of the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE-USA). In 2003, he served as the President (Northern India Council) of the Indo- American Chamber of Commerce (IACC), and has been the Chairman & Co-Chairman of the Indo-US Economic Summit in 2006 and 2007 respectively. According to you, what is a smart city? In definition; a ‘smart city’ refers to an urban area that has enhanced conditions of liveability, sustainability and workability. In simple words, it’s a safe city to live in, which provides opportunities that are high in the economic value chain. In India, every single minute, �0 people migrate to cities from rural areas. With this pace of urbanisation, 500 cities will need to be developed in the coming decade, as existing cities will crumble under the pressure of humanity. Digital technologies are just enablers. What is truly needed is a radical solution to a uniquely Indian situation with «smart thinking» and «smart solutions.» Smartness, or better, «urban development» must emanate from ground zero upwards. Therefore, it will be practical to act on basic elements such as hygiene and discipline. A smart city must meet with all requirements, such as safety, hygiene, transport, traffic management, water, environment, housing for all, etc. I believe that emphasis on city transformation in India should not be restricted to certain types of urban areas, but must be inclusive and development proposals must include small cities and villages, where urbanization is already taking place. If this is acted upon, over a period of time, these urban areas will become self-sustainable, and will contribute to the country’s economic growth. In your opinion, how will smart cities change the face of our country? India is a major emerging economy, and it’s time to take a close look at all aspects of this transformation – social, economic and ecological. Smart cities are intended to improve the quality of life by bringing efficiency in sectors such as education, health care, energy, transport, water and waste, etc. People should have access to a comfortable, clean, healthy and safe lifestyle. Aspects such as clean and consistent electricity, good schools, fast emergency responses, low crime rate, clean air and water, multiple entertainment and cultural options, will be part of this enhanced lifestyle. Tourism is one of the largest industries in the world, and urbanizing in a smart way can provide a massive boost to this sector. It wouldn’t by out of place to mention that foreigners, when they visit India, say that ‘they experience a distinct smell.’ This reflects poorly on the image of the country – that we, as a nation, cannot maintain hygiene and cleanliness. Not so long ago, India had a poor image of unreliability as business associates, which has been completely transformed by our software and manufacturing (auto components) professionals and businesses. So, there’s no reason why we can’t work togethe
  • �� REFERENCES http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/in/en/sustainable_cities/ideas/index.html?re=CS1 http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/global/files/us__en_us__cities__FS_IBM_Award_Report.pdf https://www.opendemocracy.net/openindia/mathew-idiculla/crafting-%E2%80%9Csmart-cities%E2%80%9D- india%E2%80%99s-new-urban-vision http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/narendra-modi-imprint-on-smart-city-project/1/382571.html http://www.informationweek.in/informationweek/news-analysis/297909/intelligent-transportation-systems-solve- india-traffic-congestion http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/narendra-modi-imprint-on-smart-city-project/1/382571.html https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/nsdr12/nsdr12-final2.pdf http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/en/transportation_systems/article/palmisano_itsa_speech.html http://docbox.etsi.org/workshop/indo-european%20dialogue%20on%20ict%20standards%20and%20emerging%20te chnologies/07_dibyendu_sengupta_ebtc.pdf http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/transport/its/benefits.aspx http://coeut.iitm.ac.in/ITS_synthesis.pdf http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/intelligent-transport-systems-its-market-764.html http://www.ebtc.eu/blog/insight-intelligent-transport-systems-in-india/ http://www.schneider-electric.com/solutions/ww/en/seg/27947930-smart-cities/27958436-smart-mobility http://www.trust.org/item/20140929114808-aw4ks/ http://www.fullyloaded.com.au/news/new-trucks/1410/volvo-develops-360-degree-anti-collision-scanner/ http://www.urbanmobilityindia.in/Upload/Conference/e1567e5a-42c7-4cb4-bdd1-b73c9d623f03.pdf http://www.smartcitiesindia.com/Conference-Programme.aspx
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