Training for hypertrophy

Science

chris-beardsley
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Description
How to alter resistance-training variables to maximize muscular hypertrophy, including relative load, volume, frequency, rest periods, range-of-motion, and muscle action.
Text
  • 1.Q: How can we assess which training programs will lead to the largest increases in muscle size?
  • 2. A: Long-term studies assessing training variables of the programs
  • 3. Training variables include: - Relative load (percentage of 1RM) - Volume - Proximity to muscular failure - Frequency - Rest period duration - Range-of-motion - Repetition speed - Muscle action (eccentric or concentric)
  • 4. Relative load – the studies
  • 5. Relative load – the conclusions Trained subjects: No evidence available Untrained subjects: Difficult to interpret but heavy probably superior
  • 6. Volume – the studies
  • 7. Volume – the conclusions Trained and untrained subjects: More volume = more hypertrophy
  • 8. Muscular failure – the studies
  • 9. Muscular failure – the conclusions Trained subjects: No evidence available Untrained subjects: Limited evidence but closer to failure seems superior
  • 10. Frequency – the studies
  • 11. Frequency – the conclusions Trained subjects: Conflicting evidence but higher might be better Untrained subjects: Difficult to interpret
  • 12. Rest periods – the studies
  • 13. Rest periods – the conclusions Trained subjects: Limited evidence but longer might be better Reducing rest periods might be useful Untrained subjects: No evidence
  • 14. Range-of-motion – the studies
  • 15. Range-of-motion – the conclusions Trained subjects: No evidence available Untrained subjects: Larger range-of-motion seems superior
  • 16. Repetition speed – the studies
  • 17. Repetition speed – the conclusions Trained subjects: No evidence available Untrained subjects: Difficult to interpret
  • 18. Muscle action – the studies
  • 19. Muscle action – the studies
  • 20. Muscle action – the conclusions Trained subjects: Isokinetic training, eccentric superior Isoinertial training: no evidence Untrained subjects: Isokinetic training, eccentric superior Isoinertial training, concentric might be better
  • 21. Summary Variable Untrained Trained Relative load Difficult to interpret – higher probably superior No evidence Volume More volume = greater hypertrophy More volume = greater hypertrophy Muscular failure Closer to failure = greater hypertrophy No evidence Frequency Difficult to interpret Difficult to interpret – higher might be better Rest period duration No evidence Limited evidence but longer might be better Reducing rest periods might be useful Range-of- motion Larger range-of-motion = greater hypertrophy No evidence Repetition speed Difficult to interpret No evidence Muscle action Isokinetic: eccentric superior Isoinertial: concentric superior Isokinetic: eccentric superior
  • 22. For hypertrophy: use greater volume, large ranges-of-motion, and train closer to failure
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