Training for strength

Science

chris-beardsley
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Description
How to alter resistance-training variables to maximize muscular strength gains, including relative load, volume, frequency, rest periods, range-of-motion, and muscle action.
Text
  • 1.Q: How can we assess which training programs will lead to the largest increases in strength?
  • 2. A: Long-term studies assessing the training variables of the programs
  • 3. Training variables include: - Relative load (percentage of 1RM) - Volume - Proximity to muscular failure - Frequency - Rest period duration - Range-of-motion - Repetition speed - Muscle action (eccentric or concentric)
  • 4. Relative load (high/low) – the studies
  • 5. Relative load (high/mod) – the studies
  • 6. Relative load – the conclusions Trained subjects: Little evidence available Untrained subjects: High loads superior to low loads Little difference between high and moderate loads
  • 7. Volume – the studies
  • 8. Volume – the conclusions Trained and untrained subjects: Higher volumes superior to lower volumes
  • 9. Muscular failure – the studies
  • 10. Muscular failure – the conclusions Trained and untrained subjects: Training closer to failure probably superior
  • 11. Frequency (more volume) – the studies
  • 12. Frequency (more volume) – the conclusions Trained subjects: Little evidence Untrained subjects: Higher frequency (more volume) = greater strength gains
  • 13. Frequency (same volume) – the studies
  • 14. Frequency (same volume) – the conclusions Trained subjects: Higher frequency (same volume) = more strength gains Untrained subjects: Higher frequency (same volume) = possibly slightly greater strength gains
  • 15. Rest periods – the studies
  • 16. Rest periods – the conclusions Trained and untrained subjects: Longer rest periods superior to short rest periods
  • 17. Range-of-motion (ROM) – the studies
  • 18. Trained subjects: Little evidence Untrained subjects: Greater strength gains from larger ROM Range-of-motion – the conclusions
  • 19. Repetition speed – the studies
  • 20. Repetition speed – the conclusions Trained and untrained subjects: Fast bar speeds probably superior
  • 21. Muscle action – the studies
  • 22. Muscle action – the studies
  • 23. Muscle action – the conclusions Trained and untrained subjects: Isokinetic training, eccentric superior Isoinertial training: conflicting evidence
  • 24. Summary Variable Untrained Trained Relative load High loads superior to low loads Little difference between high and moderate loads Little evidence Volume More volume = greater strength gains More volume = strength gains Muscular failure Closer to failure = greater strength gains Closer to failure = greater strength gains Frequency Higher frequency (more volume) = greater strength gains Higher frequency (same volume) = possibly slightly greater strength gains Little evidence for higher frequency (more volume) Higher frequency (same volume) = more strength gains Rest period duration Longer rest periods superior to short rest periods Longer rest periods superior to short rest periods Range-of- motion Greater strength gains from larger ROM No evidence Repetition speed Faster bar speeds probably superior Faster bar speeds probably superior Muscle action Isokinetic training, eccentric superior Isoinertial training: conflicting evidence Isokinetic training, eccentric superior Isoinertial training: conflicting evidence
  • 25. For strength: use moderate- to-high relative loads, high volumes, long rest periods, fast repetition speeds, and train closer to muscular failure
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