Chemmatters Feb2014 Puzzle

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CHEM CROSTIC 3 CHEMMATTERS PUZZLE: CHEM CROSTIC By David Olney In a crostic puzzle, a short passage or perhaps a quote is revealed in a grid. Each cell gets an alphabetic letter, placed there by the clues below the grid. A black square denotes the end of a word. Note that some words carry over to the next line. To solve the crostic , put as many of letters into the clue blanks as you can, then transfer them to the grid. For example the quote’s first letter will be found in the first blank of clue D. As you continue, you’ll soon be able to see words in the grid, and can begin to work backwards to complete more clues. The majority of the clues are from the world of Chemistry. One more hint. The first letters in each clue are arranged alphabetically going down the page. Thus it’s unlikely that the answer to clue I is AMPS… but it might be WATT ! 1 D 2 C 3 G 4 A 5 F 6 I 7 E 8 J 9 F 10 J 11G 12C 13F 14E 15B 16I 17H 18A 19J 20H 21H 22E 23F 24G 25J 26F 27D 28E 29A 30A 31F 32J 33B 34J 35C 36H 37G 38F 39A 40G 41I 42H 43B 44D 45A 46E 47H 48H 49G 50F 51A 52I 53B 54C 55A 56E 57E 58H 59F . THE CLUES A. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ Salt and last, steel and sleet, are examples of ____ . 55 4 39 51 29 45 30 18 B. __ __ __ __ Danish scientist, notably explaining atomic Hydrogen’s energy levels. 43 15 33 53 C. __ __ __ __ __ Financial misconduct, especially by government office holders. 54 12 35 2 34 D. __ __ __ H2O (s) 1 27 44 E. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ Nationality of the man honored in clue I by a derived SI unit. 57 14 28 46 7 22 56 F. __ __ __ __ __ - __ __ __ __ Wife and co-worker of Antoine Lavoisier. 59 5 23 31 13 26 50 9 38 G. __ __ __ __ __ __ Buccaneer, robber at sea. 37 49 40 3 24 11 H. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ The kind of charge an alpha particle possesses. 36 42 58 17 20 47 48 21 I. __ __ __ __ One Joule per coulomb; unit of electrical potential. 16 52 6 41 J. __ __ __ __ __ Often used (incorrectly !) as a verb to be synonymous with mass. 10 8 19 32 25 ANSWER TO CHEMMATTERS PUZZLE: THE QUOTE “If an alien were to visit Earth, … a car might appear to be a living organism.” Source: Rohrig, B. Is Your Car a Living Thing? ChemMatters, Feb 2013, pp 17–19. THE CLUES ANAGRAM BOHR GRAFT ICE ITALIAN MARIE-ANNE PIRATE POSITIVE VOLT WEIGH A Note on the Origin of this Quote: The February 2013 issue of ChemMatters contained a fascinating article by Brian Rohrig in which the (slightly edited) opening sentence is our puzzle quote. The article shows how a car converts the burning of a fuel into various energy forms (including motion), even as a human being converts food into energy that keeps us alive and moving. Analogies between the breakdown of food/ fuel molecules, digestive functions/enzymes and catalytic converters are made. A few ways by which cars are not living things are offered, as well. Also, teachers can get some ideas for classroom usage from the Teachers’s Guide for that issue. —David Olney note to the editor Patrice: You’ll have to make sure that Brian’s original article is one of the articles available for photocopying and/or downloading in that Feb 2013 issue.
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CHEM CROSTIC 3 CHEMMATTERS PUZZLE: CHEM CROSTIC By David Olney In a crostic puzzle, a short passage or perhaps a quote is revealed in a grid. Each cell gets an alphabetic letter, placed there by the clues below the grid. A black square denotes the end of a word. Note that some words carry over to the next line. To solve the crostic , put as many of letters into the clue blanks as you can, then transfer them to the grid. For example the quote’s first letter will be found in the first blank of clue D. As you continue, you’ll soon be able to see words in the grid, and can begin to work backwards to complete more clues. The majority of the clues are from the world of Chemistry. One more hint. The first letters in each clue are arranged alphabetically going down the page. Thus it’s unlikely that the answer to clue I is AMPS… but it might be WATT ! 1 D 2 C 3 G 4 A 5 F 6 I 7 E 8 J 9 F 10 J 11G 12C 13F 14E 15B 16I 17H 18A 19J 20H 21H 22E 23F 24G 25J 26F 27D 28E 29A 30A 31F 32J 33B 34J 35C 36H 37G 38F 39A 40G 41I 42H 43B 44D 45A 46E 47H 48H 49G 50F 51A 52I 53B 54C 55A 56E 57E 58H 59F . THE CLUES A. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ Salt and last, steel and sleet, are examples of ____ . 55 4 39 51 29 45 30 18 B. __ __ __ __ Danish scientist, notably explaining atomic Hydrogen’s energy levels. 43 15 33 53 C. __ __ __ __ __ Financial misconduct, especially by government office holders. 54 12 35 2 34 D. __ __ __ H2O (s) 1 27 44 E. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ Nationality of the man honored in clue I by a derived SI unit. 57 14 28 46 7 22 56 F. __ __ __ __ __ - __ __ __ __ Wife and co-worker of Antoine Lavoisier. 59 5 23 31 13 26 50 9 38 G. __ __ __ __ __ __ Buccaneer, robber at sea. 37 49 40 3 24 11 H. __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ The kind of charge an alpha particle possesses. 36 42 58 17 20 47 48 21 I. __ __ __ __ One Joule per coulomb; unit of electrical potential. 16 52 6 41 J. __ __ __ __ __ Often used (incorrectly !) as a verb to be synonymous with mass. 10 8 19 32 25 ANSWER TO CHEMMATTERS PUZZLE: THE QUOTE “If an alien were to visit Earth, … a car might appear to be a living organism.” Source: Rohrig, B. Is Your Car a Living Thing? ChemMatters, Feb 2013, pp 17–19. THE CLUES ANAGRAM BOHR GRAFT ICE ITALIAN MARIE-ANNE PIRATE POSITIVE VOLT WEIGH A Note on the Origin of this Quote: The February 2013 issue of ChemMatters contained a fascinating article by Brian Rohrig in which the (slightly edited) opening sentence is our puzzle quote. The article shows how a car converts the burning of a fuel into various energy forms (including motion), even as a human being converts food into energy that keeps us alive and moving. Analogies between the breakdown of food/ fuel molecules, digestive functions/enzymes and catalytic converters are made. A few ways by which cars are not living things are offered, as well. Also, teachers can get some ideas for classroom usage from the Teachers’s Guide for that issue. —David Olney note to the editor Patrice: You’ll have to make sure that Brian’s original article is one of the articles available for photocopying and/or downloading in that Feb 2013 issue.
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