Content Strategy for Non-Profits: Taking a Story First Approach

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  • 1. Content Strategy: Taking a“Story First” ApproachOctober 2, 2014#LEARNwithPOSSIBLE@POSSIBLE
  • 2. Today’s Presenter:ANDREW GRINAKER@206ANDREW
  • 3. My Non-Profit Experience
  • 4. STORY FIRST APPROACHNON-PROFIT EXAMPLESHOW DO YOU DO THIS?THE GOOD STUFF
  • 5. STORY FIRST APPROACH
  • 6. THE APPROACH IS QUITESIMPLE. WE BELIEVE THATTHE STORY COMES FIRST.BEFORE THE CHANNEL.
  • 7. WE DON’T FOCUS ON AFACEBOOK CONTENT STRATEGYOR A WEBSITE CONTENTSTRATEGY. WE WANT TO FOCUSFIRST ON THE STORIES WE WANTTO TELL.
  • 8. THESE STORIES SHOULD BENARRATIVES MEANT TOENTERTAIN, CAPTURE INTERESTAND MOST IMPORTANTLY EVOKEAN ACTION.
  • 9. EQUALLY AS IMPORTANTTHESE STORIES ARE NOTSINGLE MESSAGES ORADVERTISEMENTS. THEYARE A SERIES OF MESSAGESCONNECTED TO SOMETHINGLARGER.
  • 10. THESE STORIES REPRESENTWHAT THE BRAND ORORGANIZATION BELIEVES INAND WANTS THEIRAUDIENCE TO ENGAGE WITHAND FEEL A PART OF.
  • 11. THESE BRAND STORIESSHOULD DRIVE THEPRIORITIES FOR ALL CONTENTPRODUCED, PUBLISHED ANDPROMOTED.
  • 12. WITH THIS ALIGNMENT, ABRAND OR ORGANIZATION ISBETTER POSITIONED TOENSURE CONSISTENTMESSAGING AND APPROACHWITH EVERY CHANNEL ANDEVERY TARGETED AUDIENCETYPE.
  • 13. LET’S START WITH HOW WEHAVE TRADITIONALLYTHOUGHT ABOUT CONTENTTHROUGH THE LENS OF THEPUBLISHING CHANNEL.
  • 14. CHANNEL FIRST APPROACHCHANNEL FIRST• Theme #1 content• Theme #2 content• Theme #3 content• Theme #2 content• Theme #3 content• Theme #4 content• Theme #1 content• Theme #3 content• Theme #4 content• Theme #1 content• Theme #2 content• Theme #4 contentFacebook TwitterLinkedIn Tumblr
  • 15. NOW ADJUSTING THATTHINKING TO CREATE ACONTENT STRATEGY WITH A“STORY FIRST” APPROACH ANDMENTALITY.
  • 16. STORY FIRST APPROACHSTORY FIRST• .COM blog articles• Social posts• Forumcontent/response• Banner ads• Long form contenttype• Twitter posts• YouTube videos• “How To” Contenton .COM• Social posts• FB posts• .COM blog articles• Promoted TwitterpostsTheme#1Theme#2Theme#4Theme#3
  • 17. Non-Profit Examples
  • 18. I am worried about the state of branded contentCool examples, but what about me?
  • 19. Why/What/How
  • 20. 3Why ShouldI CreateContentWhat ContentShould ICreate?How Can ICreateThisContent?
  • 21. Why Should I Create Content?
  • 22. Why Should ICreate Content
  • 23. Evaluate All GoalsAll marketing/sales goals should be reviewedas potential drivers for producing content.Align Goals to Specific AudiencesOnce the goals have been defined, determinewhat audiences will be serviced with these goalsand the content produced for them.Why Should ICreate ContentIdentify and Define GoalsSelect the goals that are most realistic toachieve and further define what role you expectcontent to play.
  • 24. What Content Should I Create?
  • 25. What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 26. Topics (Stories)Based on your audience andgoals, what topics or storiesshould you be producingcontent for?Content TypeTo tell your storieseffectively, what contenttypes do you need tocreate? Article, video,infographic, etc?AudienceDetermine who youraudience is. Donors,volunteers, etc.Goal AlignmentWhat are the goals you aretrying to achieve with thecontent? The Why Section.What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 27. Content Themes• Donor Management• Success Stories• Facts/101/Q&AContent Type• Blog/Article Format• White Papers• Video• Social ContentAudience• Members• Donors• Board• VolunteersCommunication Goals• Acquire new donors• Increase volunteers• Increase awareness &reach of organization• Engaging the communityWhat ContentShould ICreate?
  • 28. Content Type• VideoAudience• DonorsContent Themes• Success StoriesCommunicationGoals• Receive moredonations What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 29. What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 30. How Should I Create This Content?
  • 31. 3How Can ICreate ThisContent?
  • 32. Evaluate ResourcesWhat content can your organization create?What do you need to outsource? Be asrealistic as possible.3How Can ICreate ThisContent?Channel & Goal PrioritizationDetermine what channels (website,Facebook, etc.) and what goals are themost important to develop content for.
  • 33. Planning AheadBased off the “What to Create” Planningstage and the resources available, build outa working editorial calendar with targetdates.Measure + OptimizeBefore publishing content, make sure you havea measurement and optimization plan in placeto properly evaluate success.3How Can ICreate ThisContent?
  • 34. The Good Stuff
  • 35. 1) Find ways to break bigger stories into a number of smaller assets to build outyour editorial calendar.2) Create a visual account of an event for your organization by using a service likeStorify.3) Don’t be afraid to share content more than once. Your audience consumescontent at different times.TOP 10“STORYFIRST” TIPS
  • 36. 4) You can duplicate and share stories, themes and even the same photoor video on different channels, but don’t copy/paste the text.5) Stay up-to-date on the latest technical enhancements for thepublishing platforms. (Images, markup, etc.)6) Explore different types of articles to build. How-To, Lists, Advice,FAQs, First-Person, etc.TOP 10“STORYFIRST” TIPS
  • 37. 7) Leverage internal employees or board members as the subject of your“Story.”8) Always be looking to Steal Borrow ideas from other Non-Profits. Don’t limityourself.9) Implement an RSS feed like Feedly or Pulse to locate and curate content ORMonitor Industry Trends with a service like Topsy or Technorati.10) Review through old marketing folders/files to locate pieces of content thatcould be updated and published.TOP 10“STORYFIRST” TIPS
  • 38. INDUSTRY TOOLS - FREEContent Management Trello, EditFlow (wordpress plugin), Google CalendarContent Distribution HootSuite, HubSpot, BufferAnalytics + Measurement Google Analytics, Native Analytics (FB, TW, etc.), Simply Measured(limited)
  • 39. INDUSTRY TOOLS - $$Analytics Simply Measured, MozContent Management CoSchedule (WordPress), Opal Moments, PercolateContent Production Skyword, SJR Group, ZooppaPaid Distribution Sharethrough, Outbrain, Taboola
  • 40. RESOURCESContent Audit Tutorials/Templateshttp://moz.com/blog/content-audit-tutorialhttp://uxmastery.com/how-to-conduct-a-content-audit/https://www.distilled.net/blog/seo/how-to-perform-a-content-audit/Editorial Calendar Templateshttps://econsultancy.com/blog/64587-eight-free-content-calendar-templates-to-help-plan-your-output#i.rfprerqyldnj11Definitions and Termshttp://www.thelanguageofcontentstrategy.com/Additional Production Exampleshttp://www.socialbrite.org/2011/04/21/8-great-examples-of-nonprofit-storytelling/Need something else? Check these two place.http://www.jonathoncolman.org/2013/02/04/content-strategy-resources/http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com
  • 41. RESOURCES
  • 42. KEY TAKEAWAYS1) Lead with the Story, not with the Channel.2) Identify why you are creating content and agree on goals before you start producing.3) Organize your content by Audience, Goal, Theme and Content Type. If this doesn’t work, choosesomething to structure your content!4) Find free (or paid) tools and resources to help the gaps of your strategy and execution.
  • 43. Thank You.
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    Description
    Everyone wants to tell engaging and compelling stories about their organization, but it isn’t easy. It must be well-orchestrated, budgeted and targeted for your audiences. The goal of our next session is to highlight which non-profits are doing storytelling and content strategy well, so that non-profits can better understand what constitutes a content strategy and structure content around the “story first” approach.
    Text
    • 1. Content Strategy: Taking a“Story First” ApproachOctober 2, 2014#LEARNwithPOSSIBLE@POSSIBLE
  • 2. Today’s Presenter:ANDREW GRINAKER@206ANDREW
  • 3. My Non-Profit Experience
  • 4. STORY FIRST APPROACHNON-PROFIT EXAMPLESHOW DO YOU DO THIS?THE GOOD STUFF
  • 5. STORY FIRST APPROACH
  • 6. THE APPROACH IS QUITESIMPLE. WE BELIEVE THATTHE STORY COMES FIRST.BEFORE THE CHANNEL.
  • 7. WE DON’T FOCUS ON AFACEBOOK CONTENT STRATEGYOR A WEBSITE CONTENTSTRATEGY. WE WANT TO FOCUSFIRST ON THE STORIES WE WANTTO TELL.
  • 8. THESE STORIES SHOULD BENARRATIVES MEANT TOENTERTAIN, CAPTURE INTERESTAND MOST IMPORTANTLY EVOKEAN ACTION.
  • 9. EQUALLY AS IMPORTANTTHESE STORIES ARE NOTSINGLE MESSAGES ORADVERTISEMENTS. THEYARE A SERIES OF MESSAGESCONNECTED TO SOMETHINGLARGER.
  • 10. THESE STORIES REPRESENTWHAT THE BRAND ORORGANIZATION BELIEVES INAND WANTS THEIRAUDIENCE TO ENGAGE WITHAND FEEL A PART OF.
  • 11. THESE BRAND STORIESSHOULD DRIVE THEPRIORITIES FOR ALL CONTENTPRODUCED, PUBLISHED ANDPROMOTED.
  • 12. WITH THIS ALIGNMENT, ABRAND OR ORGANIZATION ISBETTER POSITIONED TOENSURE CONSISTENTMESSAGING AND APPROACHWITH EVERY CHANNEL ANDEVERY TARGETED AUDIENCETYPE.
  • 13. LET’S START WITH HOW WEHAVE TRADITIONALLYTHOUGHT ABOUT CONTENTTHROUGH THE LENS OF THEPUBLISHING CHANNEL.
  • 14. CHANNEL FIRST APPROACHCHANNEL FIRST• Theme #1 content• Theme #2 content• Theme #3 content• Theme #2 content• Theme #3 content• Theme #4 content• Theme #1 content• Theme #3 content• Theme #4 content• Theme #1 content• Theme #2 content• Theme #4 contentFacebook TwitterLinkedIn Tumblr
  • 15. NOW ADJUSTING THATTHINKING TO CREATE ACONTENT STRATEGY WITH A“STORY FIRST” APPROACH ANDMENTALITY.
  • 16. STORY FIRST APPROACHSTORY FIRST• .COM blog articles• Social posts• Forumcontent/response• Banner ads• Long form contenttype• Twitter posts• YouTube videos• “How To” Contenton .COM• Social posts• FB posts• .COM blog articles• Promoted TwitterpostsTheme#1Theme#2Theme#4Theme#3
  • 17. Non-Profit Examples
  • 18. I am worried about the state of branded contentCool examples, but what about me?
  • 19. Why/What/How
  • 20. 3Why ShouldI CreateContentWhat ContentShould ICreate?How Can ICreateThisContent?
  • 21. Why Should I Create Content?
  • 22. Why Should ICreate Content
  • 23. Evaluate All GoalsAll marketing/sales goals should be reviewedas potential drivers for producing content.Align Goals to Specific AudiencesOnce the goals have been defined, determinewhat audiences will be serviced with these goalsand the content produced for them.Why Should ICreate ContentIdentify and Define GoalsSelect the goals that are most realistic toachieve and further define what role you expectcontent to play.
  • 24. What Content Should I Create?
  • 25. What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 26. Topics (Stories)Based on your audience andgoals, what topics or storiesshould you be producingcontent for?Content TypeTo tell your storieseffectively, what contenttypes do you need tocreate? Article, video,infographic, etc?AudienceDetermine who youraudience is. Donors,volunteers, etc.Goal AlignmentWhat are the goals you aretrying to achieve with thecontent? The Why Section.What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 27. Content Themes• Donor Management• Success Stories• Facts/101/Q&AContent Type• Blog/Article Format• White Papers• Video• Social ContentAudience• Members• Donors• Board• VolunteersCommunication Goals• Acquire new donors• Increase volunteers• Increase awareness &reach of organization• Engaging the communityWhat ContentShould ICreate?
  • 28. Content Type• VideoAudience• DonorsContent Themes• Success StoriesCommunicationGoals• Receive moredonations What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 29. What ContentShould ICreate?
  • 30. How Should I Create This Content?
  • 31. 3How Can ICreate ThisContent?
  • 32. Evaluate ResourcesWhat content can your organization create?What do you need to outsource? Be asrealistic as possible.3How Can ICreate ThisContent?Channel & Goal PrioritizationDetermine what channels (website,Facebook, etc.) and what goals are themost important to develop content for.
  • 33. Planning AheadBased off the “What to Create” Planningstage and the resources available, build outa working editorial calendar with targetdates.Measure + OptimizeBefore publishing content, make sure you havea measurement and optimization plan in placeto properly evaluate success.3How Can ICreate ThisContent?
  • 34. The Good Stuff
  • 35. 1) Find ways to break bigger stories into a number of smaller assets to build outyour editorial calendar.2) Create a visual account of an event for your organization by using a service likeStorify.3) Don’t be afraid to share content more than once. Your audience consumescontent at different times.TOP 10“STORYFIRST” TIPS
  • 36. 4) You can duplicate and share stories, themes and even the same photoor video on different channels, but don’t copy/paste the text.5) Stay up-to-date on the latest technical enhancements for thepublishing platforms. (Images, markup, etc.)6) Explore different types of articles to build. How-To, Lists, Advice,FAQs, First-Person, etc.TOP 10“STORYFIRST” TIPS
  • 37. 7) Leverage internal employees or board members as the subject of your“Story.”8) Always be looking to Steal Borrow ideas from other Non-Profits. Don’t limityourself.9) Implement an RSS feed like Feedly or Pulse to locate and curate content ORMonitor Industry Trends with a service like Topsy or Technorati.10) Review through old marketing folders/files to locate pieces of content thatcould be updated and published.TOP 10“STORYFIRST” TIPS
  • 38. INDUSTRY TOOLS - FREEContent Management Trello, EditFlow (wordpress plugin), Google CalendarContent Distribution HootSuite, HubSpot, BufferAnalytics + Measurement Google Analytics, Native Analytics (FB, TW, etc.), Simply Measured(limited)
  • 39. INDUSTRY TOOLS - $$Analytics Simply Measured, MozContent Management CoSchedule (WordPress), Opal Moments, PercolateContent Production Skyword, SJR Group, ZooppaPaid Distribution Sharethrough, Outbrain, Taboola
  • 40. RESOURCESContent Audit Tutorials/Templateshttp://moz.com/blog/content-audit-tutorialhttp://uxmastery.com/how-to-conduct-a-content-audit/https://www.distilled.net/blog/seo/how-to-perform-a-content-audit/Editorial Calendar Templateshttps://econsultancy.com/blog/64587-eight-free-content-calendar-templates-to-help-plan-your-output#i.rfprerqyldnj11Definitions and Termshttp://www.thelanguageofcontentstrategy.com/Additional Production Exampleshttp://www.socialbrite.org/2011/04/21/8-great-examples-of-nonprofit-storytelling/Need something else? Check these two place.http://www.jonathoncolman.org/2013/02/04/content-strategy-resources/http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com
  • 41. RESOURCES
  • 42. KEY TAKEAWAYS1) Lead with the Story, not with the Channel.2) Identify why you are creating content and agree on goals before you start producing.3) Organize your content by Audience, Goal, Theme and Content Type. If this doesn’t work, choosesomething to structure your content!4) Find free (or paid) tools and resources to help the gaps of your strategy and execution.
  • 43. Thank You.
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